Jinx (Blackwood novel)

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Jinx is the first novel in a middle-grades children's fantasy trilogy by Sage Blackwood, published by Harper Collins in 2013. Set in a sentient primeval forest called The Urwald, the novel follows the adventures of a boy named Jinx who is abandoned in the forest and rescued by the wizard Simon Magus. Jinx grows up in Simon's house. After the wizard does a spell on Jinx that causes him to lose his ability to see others' emotions, Jinx runs away to seek help from the evil Bonemaster.[1]

The second and third books in the trilogy are Jinx's Magic (2014) and Jinx's Fire (2015).

Reception[edit]

According to The New York Times, the story is magical and brilliant but the character story leaves something to be desired.[2] The book was selected as a Best Book of 2013 by Kirkus Reviews,[3] School Library Journal,[4] Booklist,[5] the Chicago Public Library,[6] and Amazon.[7]

Jinx was among the purchases made by President Obama at a D.C. area independent bookstore on the 2013 Thanksgiving weekend Small Business Saturday.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kirkus Review". Kirkus Reviews. October 10, 2012. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved June 12, 2014. 
  2. ^ Ridley Pearson (January 11, 2013). "A Wizard in Training". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 12, 2013. Retrieved December 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Kirkus Reviews". Archived from the original on August 8, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  4. ^ "School Library Journal". Archived from the original on August 10, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Booklist". Archived from the original on October 5, 2014. Retrieved October 6, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Chicago Public Library". Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Amazon Best Kids' Books of 2013". Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  8. ^ Brad Knickerbocker (November 30, 2013). "Like millions of holiday shoppers, President Obama does his bit for the economy (+video)". The Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved May 24, 2016.