Jo Jorgensen

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Jo Jorgensen
Jo Jorgensen.jpg
Personal details
Born
Joanne Marie Jorgensen

(1957-05-01) May 1, 1957 (age 63)
Libertyville, Illinois, U.S.
Nationality United States
Political partyLibertarian
ChildrenNone
ResidenceGreenville, South Carolina
EducationBaylor University/BS (1979)
Southern Methodist University/MBA (1980)
Clemson University/PhD (2002)
ProfessionBusinessperson
Politician
Lecturer
Net worth$1 Million - $5 Million (Approx.)
WebsiteCampaign website

Joanne Marie Jorgensen (born May 1, 1957) is an American academic and libertarian political activist. She is the Libertarian Party's nominee for president of the United States in the 2020 election.[1] Jorgensen was previously the Libertarian Party nominee for vice president in the 1996 U.S. presidential election as the running mate of Harry Browne.[2] She was also the Libertarian nominee for South Carolina's 4th congressional district in 1992, receiving 4,286 votes, or 2.2%.

Early life and career[edit]

Jorgensen was born in Libertyville, Illinois and raised in Grayslake. She is an alumnus of Grayslake Central High School.[3]

Jorgensen received a B.S. in Psychology at Baylor University in 1979 followed by a Master's in Administration from Southern Methodist University in 1980. She began her career at IBM working with computer systems, leaving there to become part owner and President of Digitech, Inc.[4] She received a Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Clemson University in 2002.[5]

Jorgensen is a Psychology Senior Lecturer at Clemson University, a public, land-grant university in Clemson, South Carolina[6]

1996 vice-presidential campaign[edit]

Prior to the 1996 United States presidential election, the Libertarian Party nominated Jorgensen to be the vice-presidential running mate of author Harry Browne. Jorgensen was nominated on the first ballot with 92 percent of the vote.[7][8] She participated in a vice-presidential debate televised nationwide by C-SPAN on October 22, along with Herbert Titus of the Taxpayers Party and Mike Tompkins of the Natural Law Party.[9]

Browne and Jorgensen, who were on the ballot in all 50 state and D.C., received 485,759 total votes, which placed them in fifth place with 0.5% of the popular vote. At the time, this was the Libertarian Party's best performance since 1980.

2020 presidential campaign[edit]

On August 13, 2019, Jorgensen filed with the FEC to run for the Libertarian presidential nomination in the 2020 election.[10] She formally launched her campaign at the November 2, 2019 Libertarian Party of South Carolina convention, before participating in the official South Carolina Libertarian presidential debate the same day.[11]

In the non-binding Libertarian primaries, Jorgensen was second in the cumulative popular vote, winning one of the 11 primaries.

On May 23, 2020, Jorgensen became the official Libertarian presidential nominee, making her the first woman to become the Libertarian nominee and the only female 2020 presidential candidate with ballot access to over 270 electoral votes.[12][13] That same day, Jorgensen's supporters repurposed Hillary Clinton's unofficial 2016 campaign slogan, "I'm With Her," to bring attention to alleged sexual assault victims of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. The slogan trended on Twitter that night and made national headlines.[14]

Platform[edit]

Political positions[edit]

Social Security[edit]

Social Security "would be drastically changed..the most critical -- and controversial -- component of [Jorgensen's] plan is that any American would be able to opt out of Social Security. Anyone who took this route would be allowed to invest 6.2% of their payroll taxes in individual retirement accounts but would receive no Social Security benefits at retirement."[15] However, Jorgensen is committed to making the system financially stable for current beneficiaries and those who do not opt out. [16]

Criminal justice reform[edit]

Jorgensen opposes federal civil asset forfeiture. She is also critical of the United States' high incarceration rate.[17]

War on Drugs[edit]

Jorgensen opposes the War on Drugs, calling it "racist"[18] and a "failed"[17] policy. She supports abolishing drug laws.[18]

Police demilitarization[edit]

She promotes the demilitarization of police, saying that the police's duty "is to go after specific perpetrators of violent crimes, not to act as a force against the people."[19]

Environment[edit]

Jorgensen favors nuclear power plants to reduce CO2 emissions.[17][20] She supports removing "subsidies of all forms of energy production, allowing emissions-free nuclear power a chance to compete on a level playing field" but also supports the use of hydraulic fracking with qualification, saying she will "hold fracking companies responsible for damages."[21]

Foreign policy[edit]

Jorgensen opposes embargoes, economic sanctions, and foreign aid. She favors the withdrawal of American troops from foreign wars.[22][20] She favors non-interventionism, free and open trade with other nations.[17]

Healthcare[edit]

Jorgensen supports a free-market healthcare system over the current system or single-payer.[23][24]

Immigration[edit]

In a Libertarian presidential primary debate, Jorgensen said she would immediately stop construction on President Donald Trump's border wall and eliminate quotas limiting who can immigrate to the U.S. During another primary debate, Jorgensen said she would "open up the borders," and she blamed anti-immigration sentiment on disproportionate media coverage of crimes by immigrants. She argued that immigration helps the economy and that the blending of cultures was beneficial.[25][26][27]

COVID-19[edit]

She has said the government's response to COVID-19 is "the biggest assault on our liberties in our lifetime," because of both restrictions on individual behavior such as stay-at-home orders as well as corporate bailouts, which she sees as antithetical to free-market principles and biased towards the well-connected.[23][25][28]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Winger, Richard (May 23, 2020). "Jo Jorgensen Wins Libertarian Presidential Nomination on Fourth Vote". Ballot Access Date. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  2. ^ "Greenville Woman To Run For Vice President". Herald-Journal. Associated Press. July 11, 1996. pp. A3?. Retrieved June 1, 2012.
  3. ^ Susnjara, Bob (May 25, 2020). "Woman who grew up in Grayslake is Libertarian Party's presidential pick". Daily Herald. Retrieved May 25, 2020.
  4. ^ "Jo Jorgenson | Meet Our Faculty | Who We Are | Center for Corporate and Professional Development". Furman University.
  5. ^ "College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences | Faculty and Staff Profile". Clemson University. Retrieved February 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Faculty – Department of Psychology". Clemson University.
  7. ^ Broder, David S. (July 7, 1996). "SEEKING POLITICAL BREAKTHROUGH, LIBERTARIANS PICK HARRY BROWNE". Washington Post.
  8. ^ "Libertarian Convention Acceptance Speeches". C-SPAN Video Library. July 6, 1996. Retrieved May 27, 2012.
  9. ^ "Third Party Vice Presidential Debate". www.c-span.org.
  10. ^ "Jorgensen, Jo CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT ID: P00013524". FEC.gov. August 13, 2019.
  11. ^ Welch, Matt (November 7, 2019). "Candidates Vie to Represent the Libertarian Wing of the Libertarian Party". Reason. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  12. ^ Brian Doherty (May 23, 2020). "Jo Jorgensen Wins Libertarian Party Presidential Nomination". Reason.com. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  13. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (May 25, 2020). "Libertarians pick first female presidential nominee". Fox News. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  14. ^ Obeidallah, Dean. "The truth about 'I'm with her'". www.cnn.com. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  15. ^ Social Security Would Be Drastically Changed Under This Presidential Candidate's Plan
  16. ^ https://ballotpedia.org/2020_presidential_candidates_on_Social_Security
  17. ^ a b c d "Jo Jorgensen's Bold, Practical, Libertarian Vision for America's Future". Jo Jorgensen for President 2020. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  18. ^ a b Dinan, Stephen (June 12, 2020). "Libertarian nominee says Trump, Biden both tainted on race". Washington Times. Retrieved June 21, 2020.
  19. ^ DiStaso, John (June 4, 2020). "NH Primary Source: Libertarian presidential candidate Jorgensen urges end of police 'militarization'". WMUR. Retrieved June 18, 2020.
  20. ^ a b Doherty, Brian (May 21, 2020). "Libertarian Presidential Contender Jo Jorgensen Wants To Combine Principle With Palatable Persuasion". Reason. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  21. ^ Jorgensen, Jo. "Jo Jorgensen's vision for America's future. Questions and Answers". Jo Jorgensen for President 2020. Jo Jorgensen for President. Retrieved July 4, 2020.
  22. ^ ""Turn America into One Giant Switzerland: Armed and Neutral,"". Jo Jorgensen for President 2020. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  23. ^ a b "Jorgensen Brings Pragmatic Approach to Libertarian Presidential Campaign". The Amarillo Pioneer. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  24. ^ "Libertarian Presidential Contender Jo Jorgensen Wants To Combine Principle With Palatable Persuasion". Reason.com. May 21, 2020. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  25. ^ a b "Libertarian Party Presidential Debate Offers Choice Between All Liberty Now or Moving the Ball of Liberty Down the Field". Reason. May 22, 2020. Retrieved May 22, 2020.
  26. ^ "Final Libertarian Presidential Debate with John Stossel". Youtube.com. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  27. ^ "Libertarian Party of Kentucky Presidential Debates: the Finale". Youtube. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  28. ^ "NH Primary Source: Libertarian presidential candidate Jorgensen urges end of police 'militarization'". www.wmur.com.

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Nancy Lord
Libertarian nominee for Vice President of the United States
1996
Succeeded by
Art Olivier
Preceded by
Gary Johnson
Libertarian nominee for President of the United States
2020
Most recent