Joan Horvath

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Joan Horvath is an American aeronautical engineer, writer, and entrepreneur.[1] She worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for sixteen years, in the technology transfer office and on the Magellan and TOPEX/Poseidon flight projects.[2]

She served as CEO of the now-defunct Takeoff Technologies,[3] and is a cofounder of a 3D printing company, Nonscriptum LLC.[4]

Selected works[edit]

  • Robinson, Laura Lovett, Joan Horvath, Jeff Cuzzi ; foreword Kim Stanley (2006). Saturn : a new view. New York: Abrams. ISBN 9780810930902. [5]
  • Horvath, Joan ; illustrations by Nichole Wong ; foreword by Greg (2007). What scientists actually do. Corona, Calif.: Stargazer Pub. Co. ISBN 9781933277080. [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.amazon.com/Joan-Horvath/e/B004MPBR1A/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1
  2. ^ "Technology Transforming the Learning Landscape: Entrepreneurial Opportunities in eLearning". Caltech/MIT Enterprise Forum. 2011-03-12. Archived from the original on 2011-03-11. Retrieved 2015-10-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ May, Bill (February 19, 2002). "Spaceport Prepares Grand Opening". The Journal Record, via Online Research Library: Questia. Retrieved 2015-10-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Broadcast 235 (Special Edition)". The Space Show hosted by: Dr. David Livingston. 2004-06-27. Archived from the original on 2006-11-24. Retrieved 2015-10-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Mortimer, Mark (2007-02-05). "Book Review: Saturn – A New View". Universe Today. Retrieved 2015-10-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Foust, Jeff (2008-09-22). "Review: What Scientists Actually Do". The Space Review. Retrieved 2015-10-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)