Joaquín Almunia

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Joaquín Almunia
Joaquin Almunia Mercosul.jpg
European Commissioner for Competition
In office
9 February 2010 – 1 November 2014
PresidentJosé Manuel Barroso
Preceded byNeelie Kroes
Succeeded byMargrethe Vestager
European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs
In office
24 April 2004 – 9 February 2010
Served with Siim Kallas
PresidentRomano Prodi
José Manuel Barroso
Preceded byPedro Solbes
Succeeded byOlli Rehn
Leader of the Opposition
In office
14 May 1999 – 1 July 2000
Prime MinisterJosé María Aznar
Preceded byJosep Borrell
Succeeded byJosé Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
In office
22 June 1997 – 24 April 1998
Prime MinisterJosé María Aznar
Preceded byFelipe González
Succeeded byJosep Borrell
Minister of Public Administrations
In office
26 July 1986 – 12 March 1991
Prime MinisterFelipe González
Preceded byFélix Pons Irazazábal
Succeeded byJuan Manuel Eguiagaray
Minister of Labor and Nacional Health Service
In office
1 December 1982 – 26 July 1986
Prime MinisterFelipe González
Preceded bySantiago Rodríguez Miranda
Succeeded byManuel Chaves González
Personal details
Born
Joaquín Almunia Amann

(1948-06-17) 17 June 1948 (age 70)
Bilbao, Spain
Political partySocialist Workers' Party
Alma materUniversity of Deusto
Practical School for Advanced Studies
Harvard University

Joaquín Almunia Amann (born 17 June 1948) is a Spanish politician and formerly, prominent member of the European Commission. During his tenure in the two Barroso Commissions, he was European commissioner responsible for economic and monetary affairs (2004-2009) and, subsequently, vice-president and the European Commissioner for Competition (2009-2014).[1] Previously, he had been Spanish Minister for Employment (1982-1986) and Public Administrations (1986-1991). From 1997 to 2000, he was the leader of the opposition as secretary general of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party, standing in and losing the 2000 Spanish general election against the then incumbent Spanish prime minister, José María Aznar.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Bilbao on 17 June 1948, Almunia graduated with degrees in economics and law in 1971 and 1972, respectively, from the University of Deusto in Bilbao, and completed follow-up studies at the École pratique des hautes études in Paris, France, from 1970 to 1971. He also completed a program at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University for senior managers in government in 1991. He was an associate lecturer on employment and social security law at the University of Alcalá de Henares in Madrid, Spain, from 1991 to 1994.[2]

Career[edit]

Almunia was chief economist of the Unión General de Trabajadores, a Spanish trade union affiliated to the Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE), from 1976 to 1979. He was economist at the Council Bureau of the Spanish Chambers of Commerce in Brussels from 1972 to 1975.

Almunia was a PSOE Member of the Cortes Generales from 1979 to 2004, representing Madrid. He was the minister of employment and social security from 1982 to 1986. He served as the minister of public administration from 1986 to 1991. He was replaced by Juan Manuel Eguiagaray as minister of public administration.[3] He was also the PSOE spokesperson from 1994 to 1997. Upon the resignation of Felipe González after being defeated in the 1996 elections, Almunia became the party leader from 1997 to 2000. In 2000, he was the PSOE candidate for prime minister, and the party was again defeated by incumbent Prime Minister José María Aznar. The PSOE suffered its worst result in a general election since the Spanish transition to democracy and therefore, Almunia resigned as party leader.

Almunia was the director of the research program on "equality and redistribution of income" at the Fundación Argentaria from 1991 to 1994. In 2002 he founded and served as director of a progressive think tank called Laboratorio de Alternativas (Fundación Alternativas).

He first joined the Prodi Commission on 26 April 2004 as a successor to Pedro Solbes (who had resigned to join the new Zapatero government) and was reappointed by Barroso in November 2004.

As EU Commissioner for Competition, Almunia was responsible for initiating in 2014 investigations under State aid (European Union) rules into the tax planning practices of Apple, Starbucks and Fiat,[4] as well as Amazon.[5]

He is an Honorary Fellow of St Edmund's College, Cambridge.[6]

Other activities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barroso names new EU commission team Euronews Retrieved 27 November 2009.
  2. ^ "CV Joaquín Almunia". European Commission. Retrieved 12 February 2013.
  3. ^ Guillermo M. Cejudo (March 2007). "New wine in old bottles" (PDF). CIDE. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  4. ^ European Commission. "State aid: Commission investigates transfer pricing arrangements on corporate taxation of Apple (Ireland) Starbucks (Netherlands) and Fiat Finance and Trade (Luxembourg)". Retrieved 2014-06-11.
  5. ^ European Commission. "State aid: Commission investigates transfer pricing arrangements on corporate taxation of Amazon in Luxembourg". Retrieved 2014-10-07.
  6. ^ "St Edmund's College - University of Cambridge". www.st-edmunds.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-09-10.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Jesús Sancho Rof
Minister of Labor and Nacional Health Service
1982–1986
Succeeded by
Manuel Chaves González
Preceded by
Félix Pons Irazazábal
Minister of Public Administrations
1986–1991
Succeeded by
Juan Manuel Eguiagaray
Preceded by
Felipe González
Leader of the Opposition
1997–2000
Vacant
Title next held by
José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
Preceded by
Pedro Solbes
Spanish European Commissioner
2004–2014
Succeeded by
Miguel Arias Cañete
European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs
2004–2010
Served alongside: Siim Kallas
Succeeded by
Olli Rehn
Preceded by
Neelie Kroes
European Commissioner for Competition
2010–2014
Succeeded by
Margrethe Vestager
Party political offices
Preceded by
Carlos Solchaga
Leader of the Socialist Group in the Congress of Deputies
1994–1997
Succeeded by
Juan Manuel Eguiagaray
Preceded by
Felipe Gonzalez
Secretary General of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party
1997–2000
Vacant
Title next held by
José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero