Jobie Dajka

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Jobie Dajka
Personal information
Full name Jobie Lee Dajka
Nickname Wheels
Born (1981-12-11)11 December 1981
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Died 4 April 2009(2009-04-04) (aged 27)[1]
Team information
Discipline Track
Role Rider
Rider type Sprinter
Major wins
Keirin world champion (2002)

Jobie Lee Dajka (11 December 1981 – 4 April 2009) was an Australian professional track cyclist from Adelaide, South Australia.

Biography[edit]

Dajka received an AIS Junior Athlete of the Year award in 1999, and an Achievement Award in 2002 and 2003.[2] He missed selection for the 2000 Olympic Games, but competed in the 2002 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, winning the Keirin.

Dajka was sent home from the 2004 pre-Olympic training camp, accused of having lied to the enquiries into the Mark French doping affair. His appeal at his expulsion and later suspension was unsuccessful.[3] After this, he became disillusioned and became a very heavy drinker, and gained a lot of weight. Following a tribunal on 15 June 2005, he received a three-year ban following an assault on Martin Barras, the Australian national track coach. He also vandalised his parents' home and was put under a restraining order. After suffering emotional and mental problems, Dajka had a brief stay in an Adelaide hospital suffering depression and alcohol-related stress.[4] Dajka's racing licence was reinstated on 22 December 2006; his ban was lifted early in accordance with conditions set out in the 2005 tribunal- that he sought immediate medical treatment and completed 80 hours of community service.[5]

Dajka later regained his normal health and stopped drinking, and there was talk of a comeback. However, Dajka was found dead in his home by police on 7 April 2009. The cause of his death is unknown, but police said the death is not believed to be suspicious.[6][7]

Palmarès[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Larkin, Steve (18 April 2009). "Guilt should torment you, cyclist's father tells officials". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 27 April 2009. 
  2. ^ "Awards". Australian Institute of Sport. 
  3. ^ "An interview with Jobie Dajka - What doesn't kill you...". cyclingnews.com. 1 October 2004. 
  4. ^ Jeremy Roberts (17 June 2005). "Jobie Dajka banned for three years". The Australian. 
  5. ^ "Statement regarding Jobie Dajka". Cycling Australia. 22 December 2006. 
  6. ^ AAP and Jacquelin Magnay (2009-04-08). "Cycling star Jobie Dajka found dead". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2009-04-08. 
  7. ^ "Cyclist Jobie Dajka found dead". The Daily Telegraph. 2009-04-08. Retrieved 2009-04-08. 

External links[edit]