List of Geneva Golden Tornadoes head football coaches

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Joe Banks (American football))
Jump to: navigation, search
Head coach Robert Park simultaneously served as head football coach, professor, and local minister.

The Geneva Golden Tornadoes football program is a college football team that represents Geneva College in the Presidents' Athletic Conference, a part of the NCAA Division III. The team has had 29 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1890.

Among the coaches in the history at Geneva College include College Football Hall of Fame members Bo McMillin and Cal Hubbard.

The current coach is Geno DeMarco who first took the position for the 1993 season. He leads the list with the most games coached and the most total wins. J. B. Craig has the highest winning percentage of the coaches at .859, accumulated from 1900 through the 1903 seasons and a total of 32 games. Arthur McKean managed the most tie games with 7.[1]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

No. Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs Awards
1 William McCracken 1890–1896 36 17 18 1 .486
2 Ross Fiscus 1897–1899 17 6 9 2 .412
3 J. B. Craig 1900–1903 32 26 3 3 .859
4 Smith Alford 1904 7 1 4 2 .286
5 Archibald Leech 1905 9 4 5 0 .444
6 Arthur McKean 1907–1911 41 10 24 7 .329
7 Graydon Long 1912 7 3 4 0 .429
8 Coligny Brainerd "Dr. C. B." Metheny 1913–1916 32 16 14 2 .531
9 Phillip Henry Bridenbaugh 1917–1921 40 23 12 5 .638
10 Robert Park 1922 10 4 6 0 .400
11 Tom Davies 1923 9 6 2 1 .722
12 Jack Sack 1924 9 3 4 2 .444
13 Bo McMillin 1925–1927 29 22 6 1 .776
14 Mack Flenniken 1928–1929 19 7 11 1 .395
15 Howard Harpster 1930–1932 30 22 6 2 .767
16 Jimmy Robertson 1933 9 6 3 0 .667
17 Dwight V. Beede 1934–1936 26 14 9 3 .596
18 Edgar P. Weltner 1937–1940 37 16 19 2 .459
19 Alured C. Ransom 1941–1948 34 20 12 2 .618
20 Cal Hubbard 1942 9 6 3 0 .667
21 Walter J. West 1949–1952 34 18 14 2 .559
22 Byron E. Morgan 1953–1962 87 46 35 6 .563
23 Donald Lederick 1963–1966 32 5 26 1 .172
24 Joe Banks 1967–1968 16 1 14 1 .094
25 Dan Frasier 1969–1971 26 9 16 1 .365
26 Max Holm 1972–1973 18 12 6 0 .667
27 Dick Lasse 1974–1975 18 1 17 0 .056
28 Gene Sullivan 1976–1992 160 76 82 2 .481
29 Geno DeMarco 1993–2010 190 120 70 0 .632

Details[edit]

The following are details on coaches that do not have articles. For coaches with articles on Wikipedia, see links in the table above.

Smith Alford[edit]

During his time as coach, Geneva played (and lost) games against Penn State and Pittsburgh,[5] losing 0-30 to an undefeated Pitt team [6] and later in the season 0 -44 to Penn State.[7] The season was considered especially disappointing by fans, considering the previous three-year coach J.B. Craig had posted a total record of 26-3-3.[8]

Archibald Leech[edit]

This section is about the college football coach. For the actor Archibald Leech, see Cary Grant (stage name)

Dr. Archibald W. Leech played football, basketball, and baseball at Geneva College. He was known for his athletic skills and was named "one of the most noted athletes ever graduated" from the school.[9]

The school suffered one of its largest defeats to Penn State[10] by a score of 73 to 0.[11] This game was also Penn State's ninth largest all-time margin of victory and total points scored.[12]

Leech only coached football for one year at Geneva, but stayed on as a full professor at the college.[13]

Leech gained prominence as an educator and businessman in the area of Cambria County, Pennsylvania where he also served as postmaster.[9]

Graydon Long[edit]

Graydon Long, 1906

Graydon Long (March 11, 1889-September 1966) was a professional football officials in the early days of the sport, officiating games of teams that would later make up the National Football League.

Sports history[edit]

Playing history[edit]

Long played high school football at West high School in Rochester, New York as a member of the class of 1908.[14] The 1906 team concluded an undefeated season and the 1907 team produced solid results as well.[15]

Officiating[edit]

After coaching in the college ranks, Long worked as an official for professional football[16] at the time, primarily working games for the future NFL team Rochester Jeffersons.[17]

Coligny Brainerd Metheny[edit]

The 1916 Geneva College football team. Metheney is in the back row 2nd from right.

Coligny Brainerd "Dr. C. B." Metheny (December 30, 1889 - October 19, 1960[18]) played football and basketball[19] for Carnegie Tech from 1910 through the 1912 season. One publication referred to him as a "star" quarterback.[20]

Geneva has honored his memory by building the Metheney Field House in 1961.[21] He was also given a lifetime alumni award by the school in 1946.[22]

Metheney remained active in the community of Beaver Falls and was prominent in the Kiwanis organization for several decades.[23][24] He would later serve as president of Pennsylvania Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors for 1954 and 1955.[25]

Joe Banks[edit]

Coach Joe Banks
For other people named Joseph Banks, see Joseph Banks (disambiguation).

Coach Joseph "Joe" Banks (September 8, 1919 – June 19, 2007) was a long-time college athletics figure in Ohio and Pennsylvania. He worked as a head coach for American football and track & field.

Coaching[edit]

Geneva College[edit]

Banks was the 24th head coach at Geneva[26] for two seasons, from 1967[27] until 1968. His one victory came on the last game of the 1967 season against Bridgewater College by a score of 30 to 13.[28]

Ohio Northern[edit]

Prior to taking the position at Geneva, he was the head track coach and assistant football coach at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio from 1960 until 1967.[29] where he completed a "turnaround season" in 1962.[30] After coaching at Geneva and a brief stint at a high school, he would return to Ohio Northern in 1971 for the remainder of his career, where he retired in 2002 as an admissions counselor.[26] He has been credited with recruiting more students than any other person to Ohio Northern.[31]

While at Ohio Northern, Banks would regularly hold training sessions for high school athletic administrators on how to run and promote track and field meets as well as how to coach individual events.[32]

Ohio Northern honored his contribution to the university[33] by naming their home track meet the "Joe Banks Invitational."[34]

Military service[edit]

Banks served in the United States military during World War II as a Sergeant with the Third Army's 965th Ordnance Heavy Automotive Maintenance company in the Rhineland (Battle of the Bulge) and the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre in the Philippines.[35]

Personal life[edit]

Banks earned a Bachelor of Science in education and later a Bachelor of Arts from Ohio Northern University.[36] He later completed a Master of Education from Kent State University. He graduated from high school at New Philadelphia in 1937 where he was coached at track & field by Woody Hayes.[37]

Dan Frasier[edit]

Daniel M. Frasier was named NAIA District 18 Coach of the Year in 1971.[38] Frasier engineered a turnaround of the program, when the football team went to what was considered a "laughing stock of the district" to an 8-0 start in 1971 (some records show a 7-0 start and losing the last two games[39]).[8]

Before being head football coach at Geneva, he was assistant football coach at Geneva under Donald Lederick while simultaneously acting as the head baseball coach. He also played minor league baseball for the Houston Astros farm team.[40]

Upon retirement from college coaching, he entered the private sector and took a career in banking.[38]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[2]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[3]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Geneva College 2010 Football Media Guide". Geneva College Athletics. Retrieved 9 November 2010. 
  2. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  4. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  5. ^ College Football Reference Geneva College 1904
  6. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Pittsburgh Yearly Results (1904)
  7. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Penn State Yearly Results (1904)
  8. ^ a b Pittsburgh Post-Gazette "The Geneva Story: A Winning Fairy Tale" by MARINO PARASCENZO November 3, 1971
  9. ^ a b Cambria County, PA Genealogy "History of Cambria County, V2
  10. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Penn State 1905 Season Results
  11. ^ State Collegian "State 73-Geneva 0" November 19, 1905
  12. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Penn State: 50+ Points Scored In A Game
  13. ^ New Castle News May 31, 1905
  14. ^ West High School Football Team 1906 Football Program
  15. ^ West High School Football Team 1907 Football Program
  16. ^ The Encyclopedia of Pro Football In Western New York: 1900-1949 "1913 Game Summaries"
  17. ^ Rochester Jeffersons: History 1913 Season Results
  18. ^ Nye Family History Coligny Brainerd Metheny
  19. ^ The Daily Times "Carnegie Tech Trims the Geneva Bunch" January 11, 1913
  20. ^ The Pittsburgh Press "Carnegie Tech Beats Geneva" October 11, 1914
  21. ^ Beaver Falls By Kenneth Britten, Beaver Falls Historical Society, 2000
  22. ^ Geneva College Alumni Awards
  23. ^ The Daily Times June 22, 1929
  24. ^ The Daily Times June 22, 1944
  25. ^ Pennsylvania Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors
  26. ^ a b Kenton Times "Joseph Ada Banks"
  27. ^ The Evening Standard (Newspaper) "Sports" March 16, 1967
  28. ^ Geneva College coaching records
  29. ^ Lima News, The (Newspaper) - March 19, 1967, Lima, Ohio
  30. ^ Ohio Northern University Yearbook 1962 "Track & Field"
  31. ^ Ohio Northern Magazine and Alumni Journal "Joseph Banks BA ’41 and ’46, H of F ’74" Fall 2007
  32. ^ Toledo Blade "Early Jump Into Track Season" by Chet Sullwold, March 30, 1965
  33. ^ Ohio Northern University Athletics
  34. ^ Ohio Athletic Conference "OAC Weekly Outdoor Track & Field Notes" April 23, 2007
  35. ^ The Alliance Review "Joseph Banks" June 21, 2007
  36. ^ Ohio Northern University Yearbook 1941 "Senior Class"
  37. ^ Ada Herald Joseph Banks (Obituary), June 20, 2007
  38. ^ a b Beaver Country Times "Dan Fraiser-Coach of the Year" May 23, 1972
  39. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Geneva College Football 1971
  40. ^ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette "Geneva Adds Dan Frasier" July 9, 1966