Joe Brittain

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Joseph Brittain
Personal information
Full name Joseph Brittain
Nickname Joe
Playing information
Position Stand-off/Five-eighth, Scrum-half/Halfback
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1915–≥22 Leeds 210 72 216
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1921–22 England 4 1 0 0 3
Source: rugbyleagueproject.org englandrl.co.uk

Joseph "Joe" Brittain was an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1910s, and 1920s playing at representative level for England, and at club level for Leeds, as a Stand-off/Five-eighth, or Scrum-half/Halfback, i.e. number 6, or 7.

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Joe Brittain won caps for England while at Leeds in 1921 against Wales, Other Nationalities, and Australia, in 1922 against Wales.[1]

Challenge Cup Final appearances[edit]

Joe Brittain played Scrum-half/Halfback, and scored a try in the 28-3 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1923 Challenge Cup Final during the 1922-23 season at Belle Vue, Wakefield, the only occasion the Challenge Cup final has ever been staged at Belle Vue.[2]

County Cup Final appearances[edit]

Joe Brittain played Stand-off/Five-eighth in the 11-3 victory over Dewsbury in the 1921 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1921–22 season at Thrum Hall, Halifax on Saturday 26 November 1921.[2]

Club career[edit]

Joe Brittain made his début for Leeds against Batley at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 4 September 1915.[3]

The Leeds backline in the early 1920s was known as the Busy Bs, as it included; Jim Bacon, A. Binks, Billy Bowen, Joe Brittain, and Harold Buck.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "History of Leeds Rugby League Club". britishrugbyleague.blogspot.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Dalby, Ken (1955). The Headingley Story - 1890-1955 - Volume One - Rugby. The Leeds Cricket, Football & Athletic Co. Ltd ASIN: B0018JNGVM
  4. ^ "Leeds rugby league legend medals auction". Yorkshire Evening Post. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014. 

External links[edit]