Joe Kennaway

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Joe Kennaway
JoeKennaway.jpg
Personal information
Full name James Kennaway
Date of birth (1905-01-25)January 25, 1905
Place of birth Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Date of death March 7, 1969(1969-03-07) (aged 64)
Place of death Johnston, Rhode Island, United States
Playing position Goalkeeper
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Montreal CPR
1927–1928 Providence F.C. 26 (0)
1928–1930 Providence Gold Bugs 112 (0)
1931 Fall River F.C. 17 (0)
1931 New Bedford Whalers 3 (0)
1931–1939 Celtic 263 (0)
National team
1926 Canada 1 (0)
1932–1934 Scottish League XI 4 (0)
1933 Scotland 1 (0)
Teams managed
1946–1959 Brown University
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

James "Joe" Kennaway (January 25, 1905 in Point St. Charles, Montreal – March 7, 1969 in Johnston, Rhode Island) was a dual international (Canada and Scotland)[1] football goalkeeper. He began his career in Canada, spent four years in the American Soccer League before finishing his career with Celtic F.C. in the Scottish Football League. He later coached the Brown University soccer team from 1946 to 1959.

Professional career[edit]

Kennaway began his senior soccer career with amateur Montreal club Montreal CPR, the team of the Canadian Pacific Railway.[2] In January 1927 he signed with Providence F.C.[3] of the first professional American Soccer League.[2] In 1928, the club was renamed the Providence Gold Bugs. In 1931, new ownership moved the team to Fall River, Massachusetts and renamed the team Fall River.[2] In the summer of 1931, the team again changed ownership, becoming the New Bedford Whalers. Kennaway remained with the team through all these changes.

An excellent performance in a friendly game for Fall River against a touring Celtic team in 1931 gained the attention of the Scottish side.[2][3] When their regular goalkeeper John Thomson was killed later that year, Kennaway was signed by Celtic.[2][3] Kennaway played from 1931 to 1939 in the Scottish Football League for Celtic.[2] During his stint Celtic won the league championship twice and the Scottish Cup two times (1933 and 1937). He made 295 total appearances for 'the Bhoys' and recorded 83 clean sheets.

National teams[edit]

Kennaway was a dual internationalist.[2][3] He played once for Canada, against the United States[3] in Brooklyn in 1926[2] on 6 November.[4]

After joining Celtic, he played for Scotland against Austria at Hampden Park in 1933.[2] He would have played more times for Scotland, but the other Home Nations objected to a Canadian playing in goal for Scotland. Kennaway also represented the Scottish League XI four times.[2][5]

Some reports also state that Kennaway played for the United States, but there is no evidence of this.[6][7] He did become a US citizen in 1948.[2]

Post playing career[edit]

Kennaway returned to his native Canada upon the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939.[2] His wife being from Providence, the couple settled there after the War.[2] Kennaway went on to coach the soccer team of Brown University from 1946 to 1959,[2] replacing Sam Fletcher.

In 2000, he was inducted into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Players Appearing for Two or More Countries". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 3 August 2008. Retrieved 27 June 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Joe Kennaway". Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame. iSport Media and Management. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "David Robertson, QoS to USA". www.qosfc.com. Queen of the South F.C. Retrieved 28 May 2012. 
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-01-17. Retrieved 2010-01-17. 
  5. ^ "Joe Kennaway". Londonhearts.com. London Hearts Supporters' Club. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  6. ^ Reynolds, Jim (19 January 1990). "Bruce wants to join the foreign legion". The Herald. Herald & Times Group. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  7. ^ Dart, James (5 April 2006). "Players who have been capped by more than one country". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 

External links[edit]