Joe O'Donnell (photojournalist)

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Joe O'Donnell
Joe O'Donnell (photojournalist).jpg
Born (1922-05-07)May 7, 1922
Died August 9, 2007(2007-08-09) (aged 85)
Occupation photojournalist
Nationality American

Joseph (Joe) Roger O'Donnell (May 7, 1922 – August 9, 2007) was an American documentarian, photojournalist and a photographer for the United States Information Agency.

Life[edit]

Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, his most famous work was documenting photographically the immediate aftermath of the atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945 and 1946 as a Marine photographer.

He died in Nashville, Tennessee.

Controversy[edit]

A controversy followed the printing of his obituary in the press. Some of the photographs that had been attributed to O'Donnell were actually shot by other photographers.[1] A photograph of a saluting John F. Kennedy Jr. during the funeral for his father in 1963 was taken by Stan Stearns for United Press International, not by O'Donnell. O'Donnell also claimed credit for a photograph showing Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during a wartime meeting in Tehran, Iran, in 1943, but O'Donnell is not known to have been in Tehran at the time.[2]

O'Donnell's son Tyge O'Donnell attributes some of the instances of his father's taking credit for others' work to the onset of dementia in the 1990s.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, Michael (September 15, 2007), "Known for Famous Photos, Not All of Them His", The New York Times 
  2. ^ "The Bizarre Story of Joe O'Donnell by Marianne Fulton - The Digital Journalist (August 2007)". 2008-05-31. Archived from the original on May 31, 2008. Retrieved 2016-02-04. 

External links[edit]