Jogi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Jogi (also spelled Jugi,[1] Yogi[2] ) are a Hindu community, found in North India and Sindh, with smaller number of ancient north migrants in the southern Indian states Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. They are known as Nath, Jogi Nath, Jugi Nath, Nath Jogi, and Rawal.[2][3][4][5][6]

Jogi is a colloquial term for the "yogi", which refers to the people who practiced yoga as part of their daily rituals. Over the time, this led to the formation of a community, and subsequently was formed into a caste.

History and origin[edit]

The Jogi are followers of yoga an Ascetic Warriors or Jogi Kshatriya whose Gotra(lineage origin) is Lord Shiva himself a God of War and he is the Clan Deity (Kuladevata) of them. As followers of yoga, they traditionally wear saffron-colored clothing. They are basically Protector of Religion (Dharam Rakshak), They are Warriors (Kshatriya) with the motto "fight but not to gain for self". They represent their Lineage origin(gotra) Lord Shiva Where Weapon (Shastra or Astra) and Knowledge (Shaastra) are seen together. Undoubtedly this is the reason for their economical decline as compared to other Kshatriyas. The sect once comprised lineage members only Rajputs but now are outnumbered by the other caste members.They and their descendants form a caste with two sub-groups, the Kanphata and Augur. In North India, they speak Hindi and its various dialects.[1]

Jogis of Haryana[edit]

The Jogi are found throughout the state of Haryana and speak Haryanvi.[7]

The Jogis of Haryana are often referred to as Padha Jogi, and are divided in three groupings or orders. These are the Kanphate Jogi, Padha Jogi and Jangam Jogi. Like in other parts of North India, the Jogi started off as mendicants and holymen, but over time formed a distinct caste. This is seen by the fact that they are strictly endogamous. Most Haryana Jogis are farmers, with very few still involved in their traditional occupation.

Jogis of Mangalore[edit]

There is a small population of Jogis in the Uttara Kannada(bhatkal, murdeshwar, honnavar, kumta, shirsi, siddapura, hubli total above 800 families), Dakshina Kannada and Udupi districts of Karnataka state in Bharat(India). Going by the registration to the Jogi Sangha there could be around 600–800 families of Jogis in Mangaluru city and in villages of the district.They are northmigrants to the South centuries ago the presence of Jogi families around the Kadri Jogi Mutt(matha) indicates that they were associated with this Hindu monastery and trace their ancestry origin to the northindia.

According to tradition, the Kadri Jogi(Yogi) Mutt and the nearby Manjunatha Temple were a seat of Jogi(Yogi) culture since the time of Ascetic Warriors Matsyendranath and Gorakshanath, both of whom arrived from the Nepal and Uttar Pradesh region and established the mutt (monastery) here.

The Jogis established the permanent "rule" of the Kadri Mutt by assigning a new "Jogi Arasu" (ruler) once in 12 years and making it a part of the Bara (Twelve) Panths of the Jogi system. The bara panths or twelve mutts are spread across India. Jogi(Yogi) Warriors(Kshatriya) were not supposed to have luxury desires of owning wealthy entities as they are connected with Hindu God Shiva but they are Warriors(Kshatriya) with asceticism. They were more of a "protector of religion"(Dharam Rakshak), "caretakers" of their Followers as well as Mutt.The Arasu has no major daily rituals to perform and is expected to spend most of his time in spiritual contemplation.but He will be the Chief Person during any festivals held in Temple.

A small group of Jogis in Mangalore are still keeping alive, the hope of a unified and powerful caste, by running a Jogi Sangha and conducting periodic meetings. But the small size of the caste and rapidly changing social norms are defeating such attempts. Eventually the caste may disappear into the potpourri of Indian and Global culture.[8] https://hinduperspective.com/2013/04/01/naga-sadhus-the-warrior-ascetics/

Language[edit]

Jogi, or at least the Jogi of Pakistan, is generally considered a dialect of Marwari,[9] but may be distinct enough to count as a separate language.[10]

Jogis as an Other Backward Class[edit]

Jogi are designated Other Backward Classes in most states, starting from 1993.

Official name(s) listed in section Regions
where
have
OBC status
Designation Notes
Jogi Andhra Pradesh[11]10 12011/68/93-BCC (C ) 10 September 1993
Yogi,

Jogi, Jugi Nath

Assam[2]26 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10/09/1993
Jogi (Jugi) Bihar[1]44 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Jogi, Nath Chandigarh[12]30 12011/99/94-BCC 11 December 1997
Garpagari

Joginath, Nathjogi

Chhattisgarh[4]22 12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010
Nath,

Jogi

Daman and Diu[13]16 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi, Delhi[14]25 12011/7/95-BCC 24 May 1995
Nathjogi Goa[15]7 12011/44/96-BCC 6 December 1996
Joginath,

Jogi, Nath, Jangam-Jogi, Yogi

Haryana[16]31 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/44/99-BCC 21 September 2000 12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010

Jogi (Jugi) Jharkhand[17]43 12015/2/2007-B.C.C. 18 August 2010
Jogi, Brahma Kapali,

Joger, Jogtin, Kapali, Raval, Ravalia Sanjogi, Jogar

Karnataka[18]29 12011/68/93-BCC (C ) 10 September 1993

12015/2/2007-BCC 18 August 2010

Jogi Kerala[19]22 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Garpagari,

Joginath, Nathjogi

Madhya Pradesh[20]28 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/21/1995-BCC 15 May 1995

Jogi Maharashtra[5]47 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Bharadi

Balasantoshi, Kinggriwale, Nath Bava, Nath Jogi, Nath Pandhi, Davari Gosavi

Maharashtra[5]190 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993

12011/21/95-BCC 15 May 1995

Jogi, or

Yogi

Orissa[21]53 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Nath Punjab[6]42 12011/68/93-BCC 10 September 1993
Jogi,

Nath

Rajasthan[22]22 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Sikkim[23]10 12011/36/99-BCC 4 April 2000
Jogi (including Jogis) Tamil Nadu[24]51 12011/68/93-BCC (C ) 10 September 1993
Yogi,

Jogi, Nath

Tripura[25]35 12011/9/94-BCC 19 October 1994
Jogi Uttar Pradesh[26]19 12011/68/93-BCC(C) 10 September 1993
Jogi Uttarakhand[27]37 12015/13/2010-B.C.II. 8 December 2011
Jogi West Bengal[28]28 12011/88/98-BCC 6 December 1999

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Central list of OBCs for the state of Bihar" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  2. ^ a b c "Central list of OBCs for the state of Assam" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  3. ^ People of India Uttar Pradesh Volume XLII Part Two edited by A Hasan & J C Das pages 642 to 646
  4. ^ a b "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chhattisgarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  5. ^ a b c "Central list of OBCs for the state of Maharashtra" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  6. ^ a b "Central list of OBCs for the state of Punjab" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  7. ^ People of India Hayana Volume XXIII edited by M.L Sharma and A.K Bhatia pages 269 to 273 Manohar
  8. ^ Ascetic Warriors of India
  9. ^ Marwari at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  10. ^ 2014-016_jog.pdf. www-01.sil.org
  11. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Andhra Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  12. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chandigarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  13. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Daman and Diu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  14. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of N.C.T. Of Delhi" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  15. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Goa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  16. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Haryana" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  17. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Jharkhand" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  18. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Karnataka" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  19. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Kerala" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  20. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Madhya Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  21. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Orissa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  22. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Rajasthan" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  23. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Sikkim" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  24. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tamilnadu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  25. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tripura" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  26. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttar Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  27. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttaranchal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  28. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of West Bengal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.

Further reading[edit]

Language[edit]

Jogi, or at least the Jogi of Pakistan, is generally considered a dialect of Marwari,[1] but may be distinct enough to count as a separate language.[2]

Classification[edit]

Jogi are designated Other Backward Classes in most states, starting from 1993. These are: Andhra Pradesh[3] Assam,[4] Bihar,[5] Chandigarh,[6] Chhattisgarh,[7] Daman and Diu,[8] Delhi,[9] Goa,[10] Haryana,[11] Jharkhand,[12] Karnataka,[13] Kerala,[14] Madhya Pradesh,[15] Maharashtra,[16] Orissa,[17] Punjab,[18] Rajasthan,[19] Sikkim,[20] Tamil Nadu,[21] Tripura,[22] Uttar Pradesh,[23] Uttarakhand[24] and West Bengal.[25]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marwari at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ ISO 639-3 Registration Authority Request for New Language Code Element in ISO 639-3. www-01.sil.org. 2014-1-1. Retrieved 2018-05-01.
  3. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Andhra Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  4. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Assam" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  5. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Bihar" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  6. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chandigarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  7. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Chhattisgarh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  8. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Daman and Diu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  9. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of N.C.T. Of Delhi" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  10. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Goa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  11. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Haryana" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  12. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Jharkhand" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  13. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Karnataka" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  14. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Kerala" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  15. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Madhya Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  16. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Maharashtra" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  17. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Orissa" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  18. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Punjab" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  19. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Rajasthan" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  20. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Sikkim" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  21. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tamilnadu" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  22. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Tripura" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  23. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttar Pradesh" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  24. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of Uttaranchal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  25. ^ "Central list of OBCs for the state of West Bengal" (PDF). National Commission for Backward Classes. Retrieved 15 December 2012.

External links[edit]

https://samraatnathrathore.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/01/31/JogiYogi