Johannes Høsflot Klæbo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Johannes Høsflot Klæbo
FIS Skilanglauf-Weltcup in Dresden PR CROSSCOUNTRY StP 7744 LR10 by Stepro.jpg
CountryNorway Norway
Born (1996-10-22) 22 October 1996 (age 22)
Trondheim, Norway
Height183 cm (6 ft 0 in)[1]
Ski clubByåsen IL
World Cup career
Seasons2016
Individual wins15
Indiv. podiums23
Overall titles1 – (2017/18)
Discipline titles4 – (2 SP, 2 U23)
Updated on 7 March 2018.

Johannes Høsflot Klæbo (born 22 October 1996) is a Norwegian cross-country skier who represents Byåsen IL.[2] He won three gold medals at the 2018 Winter Olympics, in his debut Olympic appearance.[3][4]

Athletic career[edit]

Klæbo made his debut in the World Cup in the 2015–16 season in the classic sprint in Drammen, Norway on 3 February 2016. He finished 15th in the race.[5]

In the following 2016–17 season, Klæbo achieved his first World Cup podium after finishing third in the classic sprint in Ruka, Finland on 26 November 2016.[6] Later in the 2016–17 season, on 18 February 2017, Klæbo got his first World Cup victory when he won the sprint freestyle in Otepää, Estonia.[7] He competed at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2017 in Lahti, Finland, winning a bronze medal at the Men's sprint competition.[8] On 17 March 2017 in Quebec City he won his first small crystal globe in the Sprint World Cup and also won the Helvetia U23 overall ranking after winning the end-of-season mini tour. He finished his second World Cup season with three victories.

Klæbo participated in his first Olympics at the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea. Prior to the Olympics, he had nine victories in the 2017–18 World Cup.[9] He made his Olympic debut by finishing 10th in the men's skiathlon event.[10] On 13 February 2018 he became an Olympic champion after winning the men's sprint. This victory made him the youngest ever male to win an Olympic event in cross-country skiing.[11] He skied the last leg on the Norwegian teams that won both the 4 × 10 kilometre relay and the men's team sprint.[12][13] A steep hill on the Olympic course was dubbed “Klæbo-bakken” (“Klæbo hill”) by Norwegian media after Klæbo overtook his competitors several times in this climb throughout the games.[14][15] With three gold medals, he tied with French biathlete Martin Fourcade for most gold medals won in the games.[16]

World Cup results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[17]

Season titles[edit]

  • 5 titles – (1 overall, 2 sprint, 2 U23)
Season
Discipline
2017 Sprint
U23
2018 Overall
Sprint
U23

World Cup standings[edit]

 Season   Age  Season Standings Ski Tour Standings
Overall Distance Sprint U23 Nordic
Opening
Tour de
Ski
World Cup
Final
Ski Tour
Canada
2016 20 110 68 12 N/A
2017 21 4 29 1 1 2 1 N/A
2018 22 1 7 1 1 1 25 N/A

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 15 victories – (11 WC, 4 SWC)
  • 23 podiums – (18 WC, 5 SWC)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 2016–17 26 November 2016 Finland Ruka, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C World Cup 3rd
2 2–4 December 2016 Norway Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
3 14 January 2017 Italy Toblach, Italy 1.2 km Sprint F World Cup 3rd
4 18 February 2017 Estonia Otepää, Estonia 1.4 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
5 8 March 2017 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.2 km Sprint C World Cup 2nd
6 18 March 2017 Canada Quebec City, Canada 15 km C Mass Start Stage World Cup 1st
7 17–19 March 2017 Canada World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 1st
8 2017–18 24 November 2017 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C Stage World Cup 1st
9 25 November 2017 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 15 km C Individual Stage World Cup 1st
10 24–26 November 2017 Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 1st
11 2 December 2017 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 1.5 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
12 3 December 2017 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 15 km + 15 km C/F Skiathlon World Cup 1st
13 9 December 2017  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 1.5 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
14 17 December 2017 Italy Toblach, Italy 15 km C Pursuit World Cup 1st
15 13 January 2018 Germany Dresden, Germany 1.2 km Sprint F World Cup 2nd
16 20 January 2018 Slovenia Planica, Slovenia 1.6 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
17 21 January 2018 Slovenia Planica, Slovenia 15 km C Individual World Cup 2nd
18 27 January 2018 Austria Seefeld, Austria 1.4 km Sprint F World Cup 1st
19 3 March 2018 Finland Lahti, Finland 1.6 km Sprint F World Cup 3rd
20 7 March 2018 Norway Drammen, Norway 1.2 km Sprint C World Cup 1st
21 16 March 2018 Sweden Falun, Sweden 1.4 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 1st
22 2018–19 24 November 2018 Finland Rukatunturi, Finland 1.4 km Sprint C World Cup 2nd
23 15 December 2018  Switzerland  Davos, Switzerland 1.5 km Sprint F World Cup 1st

World Championship results[edit]

  • 1 medal – (1 bronze)
 Year   Age   15 km 
individual
 30 km 
 skiathlon 
 50 km 
mass start
 Sprint   4 × 10 km 
 relay 
 Team 
 sprint 
2017 20 15 3 4

Olympic results Olympic rings without rims.svg[edit]

  • 3 medals – (3 gold)
 Year   Age   15 km 
individual
 30 km 
 skiathlon 
 50 km 
mass start
 Sprint   4 × 10 km 
 relay 
 Team 
 sprint 
2018 21 10 1 1 1

Personal life[edit]

Johannes is born in Oslo, the capital of Norway. He lived there until he was five years old, before he and his family moved to Trondheim. He grew up there and still lives there today. Johannes is very close to his family and spends a lot of time with them.[18] His father, Haakon, is his manager and his grandfather, Kåre, is his coach.[19]

Outside sports Johannes runs a YouTube channel where he uploads weekly videoblogs. He films his everyday life as an athlete. He started doing this because he wanted people to see what cross-country skiers do outside the competitions and the season. His siblings help him out by editing and translating the videos. As of November 2018, Johannes has about 74,000 subscribers on his YouTube channel, and over 100 videos.[20]

He is a part of Norway's elite sprint team.

References[edit]

  1. ^ PyeongChang 2018 - The Norwegian Team – Athletes – Cross Country. Olympiatoppen. Retrieved 9 February 2018.
  2. ^ "KLAEBO Johannes Hoesflot". FIS. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  3. ^ "Klæbo heads home from a 'golden OL'". www.newsinenglish.no. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
  4. ^ "KLÆBO Johannes Høsflot". Pyeongchang 2018 Olympics. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
  5. ^ "KLAEBO Johannes Hoesflot – Results – 2016". FIS. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  6. ^ "Reservene herjet i Ruka: – Dette betyr mye". NRK (in Norwegian). 26 November 2016. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Overlegen Klæbo knuste alle og vant sprinten: – En nytelse å se på". NRK (in Norwegian). 18 February 2017. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  8. ^ Men's sprint results Lahti 2017
  9. ^ "KLAEBO Johannes Hoesflot – Results – 2018". FIS. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  10. ^ "KLAEBO Johannes Hoesflot – Results – 2018". FIS. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  11. ^ "Tidenes yngste vinner av OL-gull". www.langrenn.com (in Norwegian). 2018-02-13. Retrieved 8 March 2018.
  12. ^ "Klæbo sikret stafettgull etter utrolig rykk". NRK (in Norwegian). 18 February 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  13. ^ "Klæbo lurte konkurrentene og sikret OL-gull på lagsprinten". NRK (in Norwegian). 2018-02-28. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  14. ^ "Slik opplevde mamma og morfar Klæbos gulløp". TV 2 (in Norwegian). Retrieved 13 February 2018.
  15. ^ "Klæbo lurte konkurrentene og sikret OL-gull på lagsprinten". NRK (in Norwegian). 2018-02-28. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  16. ^ "Multi-medallists". PyeongChang 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  17. ^ "Athlete : KLAEBO Johannes Hoesflot". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  18. ^ "Markets sponser Johannes H. Klæbo" [Markets sponsors Johannes H. Klæbo]. Sparebank 1 Markets. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  19. ^ Skjerdingstad, Anders (19 March 2017). "Slik ble han millionær og superstjerne" [How he became a millionaire and superstar]. NRK (in Norwegian). Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  20. ^ Sundberg, Charlotte Ø.; Andersen, Robin (11 May 2018). "Klæbo kjedet seg på hotellrommet. Da fikk han en smart idé" [Klæbo was bored in the hotel room. Then he got a clever idea.]. Aftenposten (in Norwegian). Retrieved 23 August 2018.

External links[edit]