John Allen (Arizona politician)

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John Allen
John Allen by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 15th[1] district
Assumed office
January 14, 2013
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 11th[1] district
In office
January 2003 – January 2005
Serving with Stephen Tully
Member of the Arizona House of Representatives
from the 7th district
In office
January 2001 – January 2003
Serving with Ray Barnes
Personal details
Born Long Island, New York
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Alma mater Arizona State University
Website azallen.com

John M. Allen (born in Long Island, New York)[2] is an American politician and a Republican member of the Arizona House of Representatives representing District 15 since January 14, 2013. Allen previously served non-consecutively from January 2001 until January 2005 in the District 7 and 11 seats.

Education[edit]

Allen graduated from Arizona State University.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 Running in District 15, with incumbent Democratic Representatives Katie Hobbs running for Arizona Senate and Lela Alston redistricted to District 24, and with incumbent Republican Representative David Smith redistricted from District 7, Allen ran in the four-way August 28, 2012 Republican Primary, placing second with 7,813 votes, and Smith placed third.[3] Allen won the second seat in the November 6, 2012 General election with 46,612 votes above Democratic nominee Patricia Flickner.[4]
  • 2000 To challenge incumbent Republican Representatives Carolyn Allen and Wes Marsh for the District 28 seat, Allen ran in the four-way September 12, 2000 Republican Primary, placing third behind them;[5] they went on to win the November 7, 2000 General election, and Carolyn Allen later served in the Arizona Senate.
  • 2002 Redistricted to District 7, and with incumbent Democratic Representatives Cheryl Chase and Mark A. Clark redistricted to District 23, Allen ran in the six-way September 10, 2002 Republican Primary, placing first with 3,424 votes,[6] and won the first seat in the three-way November 5, 2002 General election with 24,138 votes above fellow Republican Ray Barnes and Democratic nominee Virgel Cain;[7] Barnes served in the seat from 2003 until 2011.
  • 2004 Switching to District 11, and with incumbent Republican Representative Deb Gullett departing the Legislature, Allen ran alongside Stephen Tully in the four-way September 7, 2004 Republican Primary, placing second with 8,454 votes,[8] and won the second seat in the November 2, 2004 General election with 44,054 votes above Libertarian candidates Garry Myers and James Iannuzo.[9]
  • 2006 With Republican Representative Stephen Tully departing the Legislature, Allen ran in the four-way September 12, 2006 Republican Primary, placing third behind Adam Driggs and Don Hesselbrock,[10] Driggs and Democratic nominee Mark Desimone won the district's seats in the November 7, 2006 General election; Driggs later served in the Arizona Senate.
  • 2008 Running for one of the three seats up for election on the Arizona Corporation Commission, Allen ran in the eight-way September 2, 2008 Republican Primary, placing fourth behind Bob Stump, former state Representative Marian McClure, and Barry Wong;[11] in the November 4, 2008 General election, Democratic former state Senator Sandra Kennedy placed first, Democratic former state Representative Paul Newman placed second, and Stump took the third seat.

Controversy[edit]

In 2016 Allen generated controversy by announcing that teachers should get second jobs if they want "boats and the finer things in life".[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "John Allen". Phoenix, Arizona: Arizona State Legislature. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  2. ^ "John Allen's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  3. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 Primary Election August 28, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  4. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2012 General Election November 6, 2012" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 11. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 12, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2000 Primary Election – September 12, 2000" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 Primary Election – September 10, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 26, 2004. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  7. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2002 General Election – November 5, 2002" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 6. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 26, 2004. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  8. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 Primary Election – September 7, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: [Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 22, 2004. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2004 General Election – November 2, 2004" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 26, 2004. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  10. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2006 Primary Election – September 12, 2006" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 26, 2006. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  11. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass 2008 Primary Election – September 2, 2008" (PDF). Phoenix, Arizona: Secretary of State of Arizona. p. 12 & 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 17, 2008. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  12. ^ Fawaz, Sahid. "Republican Lawmaker to Teachers: If You Want a Better Life, Get a Second Job". labor411.org. 

External links[edit]