John Ankerberg

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John Ankerberg
Born
John Ankerberg

(1945-12-10) December 10, 1945 (age 73)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationEvangelist, Television personality, author, apologist theologian
EmployerAnkerberg Theological Research Institute (President)
Known forFounder, President of Ankerberg Theological Research Institute, Chicago, IL
Host, The John Ankerberg Show TV program (syndicated)
TitleJohn Ankerberg
Spouse(s)Darlene
Children1 daughter, Michelle
Websitewww.johnankerberg.com

John Ankerberg (born December 10, 1945) is an American Christian television host, author, and speaker. He is an ordained Baptist minister and has authored or coauthored more than 158 books and study guides.[1] He is the producer and host of the internationally televised weekly program The John Ankerberg Show.[2] Ankerberg earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago, an M.A. in Church History and Philosophy of Christian Thought, and a Master of Divinity from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He earned a Doctor of Ministry from Luther Rice Seminary in Lithonia, Georgia.[3]

Ministry[edit]

His ministry, the John Ankerberg Show, launched in 1980 on one network in Kansas City, Missouri. His organization notes:

"While speaking at a Youth for Christ summer camp, he was first asked to host a Kansas City Christian television program. Structuring the program with a debate-format, the show quickly caught the attention of other networks. After moving to Chattanooga, Tennessee to serve another media ministry, The John Ankerberg Show was picked up on CBN, a new network that soon expanded nationwide. Within a short time, Dr. Ankerberg’s side project quickly became a full-time ministry in 1980, renting office space and studio time to produce additional programs."[4]

The television program airs on Daystar, God TV, and internationally in 10 languages with 4.5 billion potential viewers in virtually every nation.[5]

Influential among conservative evangelicals, John Ankerberg was a noted influence in the life of Arkansas governor and Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee.[6] In 2018, Ankerberg met with a delegation of leaders regarding international Christian persecution with vice president Mike Pence.[7]

National Religious Broadcasters[edit]

John Ankerberg is a member of the Board of Directors of the National Religious Broadcasters, a position he has held on multiple occasions. He was most recently noted as a member of the Board Class of 2020.[8]

Bakker and PTL scandal[edit]

In 1987, Ankerberg presented evidence that exposed moral failings of televangelist Jim Bakker, which included solicitation for sex and homosexual relations.[9][10][11]

Evangelicals and Catholics Together[edit]

In 1995 Ankerberg and other evangelical leaders expressed opposition to the proposed Evangelicals and Catholics Together ecumenical document designed to foster a sense of unity and cooperation between Protestant evangelicals and Catholics. This opposition resulted in a meeting which drafted an amendment clarifying the beliefs of the evangelical signers, which stated that "cooperation with evangelically committed Roman Catholics, does not imply acceptance of Roman Catholic doctrinal distinctives or endorsement of the Roman Catholic Church system." Ankerberg stated that the meeting "heals the breach", but "failed to mollify the concerns of many evangelicals."[12]

Personal life[edit]

Ankerberg grew up in Mount Prospect, Illinois and now lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Ankerberg is married to Darlene and they have one daughter, Michelle.

Awards[edit]

Published works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Broadcasters, National Religious. "Dr. John Ankerberg Honored With NRB's William Ward Ayer Award". National Religious Broadcasters. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  2. ^ "The John Ankerberg Show schedule". johnankerberg.org. Retrieved 2009-06-14.
  3. ^ jashow.org, About Dr. John Ankerberg
  4. ^ Ankerberg, John. "Our Story - Ankerberg Theological Research Institute, John Ankerberg Show". Ankerberg Theological Research Institute, John Ankerberg Show. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  5. ^ Ankerberg, John. "Our Story - Ankerberg Theological Research Institute, John Ankerberg Show". Ankerberg Theological Research Institute, John Ankerberg Show. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  6. ^ "Mike Huckabee: Is a folksy showman willing to get meaner?". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  7. ^ Broadcasters, National Religious. "Vice President Pence Hosts NRB Members at the White House". National Religious Broadcasters. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  8. ^ Broadcasters, National Religious. "BOARD OF DIRECTORS". National Religious Broadcasters. Retrieved 2018-06-05.
  9. ^ "Church Hears Bakker Accusations". Chicago Tribune. April 26, 1987. Retrieved 2014-06-24.
  10. ^ "Falwell Says He May Quit PTL Club". NY Times (AP). April 27, 1987. Retrieved 2009-06-14.
  11. ^ Lauter, David (1987-04-27). "Early Return Would 'Doom Ministry,' Falwell Warns Bakker". Articles.latimes.com. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  12. ^ "Document on Interfaith Cooperation Causes Rift". Articles.latimes.com. 1995-03-18. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  13. ^ Broadcasters, National Religious. "Dr. John Ankerberg Honored With NRB's William Ward Ayer Award". National Religious Broadcasters. Retrieved 2018-06-05.

External links[edit]