John Ashton (architect)

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John Ashton
Born1860
Died1953
NationalityEnglish-American
OccupationArchitect

John Ashton (1860-1953) was an American architect from Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Life[edit]

Ashton was born in England in 1860, immigrating to the United States in 1875, where he settled in Lawrence.[1] He worked as a mechanic with Joseph James through at least 1889,[2] about the time be appears to have begun to study architecture.[1] He opened an office of his own in 1893. He quickly rose through the profession, and became a major competitor of the more-established George G. Adams, the city's leading architect.[3]

He was a sole practitioner until 1909, when he established a partnership with Albert Senter Huntress. The firm was expanded in 1920 to include John F. Alter.[4] Ashton, Huntress & Alter was dissolved in 1933, when Alter opened his own office.[5] Ashton and Huntress practiced together until 1943, when Ashton retired.[3] Huntress continued the firm, admitting Clarence A. Pratt to the partnership. Ashton, Huntress & Pratt was dissolved upon Pratt's death in 1955. Huntress' fate is unknown, but Ashton died in 1953.[2]

Legacy[edit]

Several buildings by Ashton and his firms are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Architectural works[edit]

John Ashton, 1893-1909[edit]

  • 1895 - Engine House No. 6, 480 Howard St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[6]
  • 1897 - United Congregational Church, 61a Warren St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[7]
  • 1897 - Joseph James House, 567 Haverhill St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[2]
  • 1897 - Joseph Walworth House, 541 Haverhill St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[8]
  • 1898 - Blakeley Building, 477 Essex St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[1]
    • Home to the Ashton office through the 1950s.
  • 1899 - Central Fire Station, 24 Lowell St, Methuen, Massachusetts[9]
  • 1899 - Lawrence High School (Former), 51 Lawrence St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[10]
  • 1903 - Portsmouth High School (Former), 20 Islington St, Portsmouth, New Hampshire[11]
  • 1904 - John Ashton House, 571 Haverhill St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[3]
    • The architect's own home.
  • 1908 - Engine House No. 9, 161 1/2 Bailey St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[12]

Ashton & Huntress, 1909-1920[edit]

Ashton, Huntress & Alter, 1920-1933[edit]

  • 1920 - Charles S. Brown School (Former), 30 Conant St, Beverly, Massachusetts[24]
  • 1921 - Stephen Barker School, 129 Haverhill St, Methuen, Massachusetts[25]
  • 1922 - Saxonville School, 25 Elm St, Saxonville, Massachusetts[26]
  • 1923 - Calvary Baptist Church, 234 Common St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[27]
    • Demolished.
  • 1924 - American Legion Post No. 122, 190 Broadway, Methuen, Massachusetts[28]
  • 1925 - James F. Leonard School, 60 Allen St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[29]
  • 1926 - Framingham Memorial Building, 150 Concord St, Framingham, Massachusetts[30]
  • 1927 - Masonic Temple, 31 Green St, Newburyport, Massachusetts[31]
  • 1928 - Arcade Building, 149 Concord St, Framingham, Massachusetts[32]
  • 1929 - Boston & Maine Station, 65 Merrimack St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[33]
  • 1929 - Eagle Tribune Building, 281 Essex St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[34]
  • 1930 - Portsmouth Junior High School, 155 Parrott Ave, Portsmouth, New Hampshire[35]
  • 1931 - James I. Lawlor School, 41 Lexington St, Lawrence, Massachusetts[36]

Ashton & Huntress, 1933-1943[edit]

Ashton, Huntress & Pratt, 1943-1955[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "LAW.764". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  2. ^ a b c "LAW.110". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  3. ^ a b c "LAW.111". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  4. ^ American Contractor 24 April 1920: 41. Chicago.
  5. ^ American Architects Directory. New York: R. R. Bowker, 1955.
  6. ^ "LAW.763". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  7. ^ American Architect and Building News 8 May 1897: xiii. Boston.
  8. ^ American Architect and Building News 24 April 1897: xii. Boston.
  9. ^ "MET.29". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  10. ^ School Journal 6 May 1899: 529. Milwaukee.
  11. ^ School Board Journal July 1903: 37. Milwaukee.
  12. ^ "LAW.724". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  13. ^ American Architect 20 Oct. 1909: 8. Boston.
  14. ^ American Architect 11 May 1910: 8. Boston.
  15. ^ School Board Journal Sept. 1909: 28. Milwaukee.
  16. ^ American Contractor 20 April 1910: 21. Chicago.
  17. ^ "LYN.468". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  18. ^ "BEV.274". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  19. ^ American Contractor 20 June 1914: 59. Chicago.
  20. ^ a b American Contractor 3 July 1915: 77. Chicago.
  21. ^ Engineering News 3 Feb. 1916: 70. New York.
  22. ^ American Contractor 20 Sept. 1919: 52. Chicago.
  23. ^ Engineering News-Record 4 Nov. 1920: 242. New York.
  24. ^ American Contractor 19 June 1920: 54. Chicago.
  25. ^ "MET.500". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  26. ^ American Contractor 20 May 1922: 57. Chicago.
  27. ^ "LAW.202". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  28. ^ "MET.1690". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  29. ^ Engineering News-Record 2 July 1925: 13. New York.
  30. ^ "FRM.230". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  31. ^ "NWB.326". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  32. ^ "FRM.253". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  33. ^ Engineering News'Record 1929: 1356. New York.
  34. ^ "LAW.234". mhc-macris.net. Massachusetts Historical Commission, n.d.
  35. ^ Metalcraft Aug. 1930: 103.
  36. ^ Engineering News-Record 25 June 1931: 63. New York.
  37. ^ Engineering News-Record Aug. 1937: 638. New York.
  38. ^ Engineering News-Record 15 Dec. 1938: 56. New York.
  39. ^ Engineering News-Record 13 Nov. 1941: 27. New York.
  40. ^ Engineering News-Record 18 June 1942: 222. New York.
  41. ^ Engineering News-Record 7 Feb. 1946: 250. New York.
  42. ^ Annual Report of the Town of Salem, NH for the Year Ending December 31, 1950. Somersworth: Free Press, 1951.
  43. ^ Engineering News-Record 13 Dec. 1951: 96. New York.
  44. ^ Architectural Forum 1952: 141.
  45. ^ Progressive Architecture 1956: 148.
  46. ^ "Our Lady Seat of Wisdom Chapel". http://library.marist.edu/. n.d.