John Barilaro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

John Barilaro
John Barilaro 2016.jpg
Barilaro in 2016
18th Deputy Premier of New South Wales
In office
15 November 2016 – 6 October 2021
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Dominic Perrottet
Preceded byTroy Grant
Succeeded byPaul Toole
Leader of the National Party in New South Wales
In office
15 November 2016 – 6 October 2021
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Dominic Perrottet
DeputyNiall Blair
Paul Toole
Preceded byTroy Grant
Succeeded byPaul Toole
Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade
In office
2 April 2019 – 4 October 2021
PremierGladys Berejiklian
Preceded byHimself (as Minister for Regional New South Wales)
Niall Blair (as Minister for Trade and Industry)
Succeeded by
Minister for Regional Development /
Minister for Regional New South Wales
In office
2 April 2015 – 23 March 2019
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded byTroy Grant (as Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services)
Succeeded byhimself (as Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade)
Minister for Small Business
In office
17 October 2014 – 23 March 2019
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded byAndrew Stoner
Succeeded byDamien Tudehope (as Minister for Finance and Small Business)
Minister for Skills
In office
2 April 2015 – 23 March 2019
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded byVerity Firth (as Minister for Education and Training)
Succeeded byGeoff Lee (as Minister for Skills and Tertiary Education)
Minister for Regional Tourism
In office
17 October 2014 – 2 April 2015
PremierMike Baird
Preceded byKatrina Hodgkinson
Succeeded byStuart Ayres (as Minister for Trade, Tourism and Major Events)
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Monaro
In office
26 March 2011 – 31 December 2021
Preceded bySteve Whan
Majority11.61% (2019)
Personal details
Born
Giovanni Domenic Barilaro

(1971-11-14) 14 November 1971 (age 50)
Queanbeyan, New South Wales, Australia
NationalityAustralian
Political partyThe Nationals
Spouse(s)Deanna Barilaro (c. 1995 - 2021)[1]
Children3 (f)
ResidenceJerrabomberra, New South Wales
OccupationSmall business owner

Giovanni Domenic "John" Barilaro (born 14 November 1971[2]) is a former Australian politician who served as the 18th Deputy Premier of New South Wales and the New South Wales Leader of The Nationals until 6 October 2021. He has been the Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade in the second Berejiklian ministry since April 2019,[3][4][5] and a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing the electoral district of Monaro since 2011.[6]

Barilaro previously served as the Minister for Regional Development (later renamed Minister for Regional New South Wales[7]), Minister for Small Business, and Minister for Skills in the first Berejiklian and second Baird governments, from October 2014 until March 2019; and as the Minister for Regional Tourism in the first Baird government. In October 2021, he announced his resignation as Deputy Premier, Leader of the National Party and member for Monaro, saying it was "the right time for me to hand the reins over".[8]

Early years and background[edit]

Barilaro was born in Queanbeyan to immigrant parents from Calabria, Italy.[9] After leaving school he worked on the factory floor of his family's business. Before entering politics, he managed Ryleho, a business that manufactures energy-efficient timber windows and doors. He has campaigned within his local community for a high school for the growing suburb of Jerrabomberra, and helped found the Queanbeyan Macedonia Football Club (soccer), before serving for eight years as its club president.[10][11][12]

Political career[edit]

Barilaro was elected as an independent councillor of Queanbeyan City Council in 2008 and served on the council until he ran for the National Party in the seat of Monaro at the 2011 state election. He won the seat from incumbent Labor Minister Steve Whan with an 8.2-point swing to the Nationals.[13]

Following the resignation of Andrew Stoner in October 2014, Barilaro was appointed to the first Baird ministry as the Minister for Small Business and the Minister for Regional Tourism.[14] Baird rearranged his ministry following the 2015 state election, and Barilaro was sworn in as the Minister for Regional Development, the Minister for Skills, and the Minister for Small Business in the second Baird government.[15]

On 15 November 2016, Barilaro was elected unopposed as leader of the National Party in New South Wales, following the resignation of Troy Grant.[16] Following the resignation of Mike Baird and the election of Gladys Berejiklian as Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party, Barilaro led The Nationals to form the Liberal-National coalition in the Berejiklian ministry that was sworn in on 23 January 2017.[17][18][19]

On 1 December 2017, Barilaro called for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to resign as a "Christmas gift" to Australians. Turnbull subsequently accused Barilaro of "trying to ingratiate himself" with radio presenter Alan Jones. Turnbull also stated he had called Barilaro and left a message after previous criticism, but had not heard back, and suggested Barilaro should have expressed his view to Turnbull personally, rather than "bagging [him] in the media". Several federal ministers, including Julie Bishop and Mathias Cormann were also critical of Barilaro, with Cormann stating: "He is not a federal member of parliament, I don't know him, I have never met him, it is a regrettable comment, it is uncalled for, it is wrong, I reject it".[20]

At the 2019 state election, even as the Coalition suffered a 3.6 percent swing and his own party lost four seats, Barilaro was easily reelected in Monaro. He picked up a swing of over nine percent, enough to make Monaro a safe National seat. Following the 2019 state election, Barilaro was sworn in as the Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade in the second Berejiklian ministry, with effect from 2 April 2019.[21]

In April 2020, Barilaro expressed anger[22] at fellow Minister Don Harwin after revelations he had traveled to his Central Coast holiday house despite bans on non-essential travel. Barilaro had led the government’s calls for city people to stay out of the regions during the Covid-19 lockdown[23] however was ultimately accused of "gross hypocrisy"[24] by members of his own government after Barilaro reveled he spent a weekend 'on the farm' building a cubby house with his daughter, 'the farm' being his luxury 7 bedroom french provincial style regional estate.[25] Following an investigation into the incident, NSW Police ruled Barilaro did not breach coronavirus restrictions by making the trip and in a statement Barilaro said he went to the farm to "feed chickens, mow lawns and tend to maintenance".[26]

On 30 April 2020, Barilaro was considering stepping down from State politics to contest the federal seat of Eden-Monaro in its upcoming by-election, following Mike Kelly's immediate resignation from politics owing to personal and familial health issues,[27] but later withdrew his interest.[28] He attributed the decision to a lack of support from Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack, whom he accused of fearing him as a leadership rival.[29] Barilaro then apologised for his actions.[30] Barilaro sent minister Andrew Constance an abusive text message while Constance was deliberating running for the by-election. Constance claims Barilaro's message convinced him "politics was stuffed", and he decided not to run.[31]

In September 2020 Barilaro threatened to move the Nationals to the crossbench in opposition to the government's policy to protect koalas, while National ministers maintained their positions in cabinet. Premier Gladys Berejiklian rejected the offer and gave Nationals ministers an ultimatum to withdraw their threat or be fired. Barilaro subsequently backed down and kept his ministry,[32] though the government later shelved the koala protection bill, viewed as a ‘win’ for the Nationals at the time, though a ‘regression’ for koala protection.[33][34]

An effigy of Barilaro appeared at the 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, depicting him as sitting inside a barrel; a reference to criticisms of "pork barrelling".[35][36] Barilaro had spoken favourably of being given the nickname "Pork Barilaro", saying that what is typically described as pork barrelling is "actually an investment".[37][38]

On 24 November 2021, Barilaro delivered his valedictory speech in NSW Parliament in which he closed with "one piece of advice: Be kind to each other. If we have learned anything over the past two years it is to be kind to each other".[39] He officially resigned in December 2021.[40]

Friendlyjordies controversy[edit]

From the latter half of 2020, YouTube comedian and political commentator Jordan Shanks, known online as friendlyjordies, published a series of videos criticising Barilaro for the 2019–20 bushfire season and accusing him of corruption. Barilaro publicly expressed offence at Shanks' mocking depictions, where Shanks likens Barilaro to Mario from the Super Mario video games and comments that Barilaro is "powered by spaghetti",[41] citing Barilaro’s consistent annual victories at a Queanbeyan spaghetti-eating contest.[42][43] Barilaro accused the depictions of "racist undertones".[44] In May 2021, Barilaro lodged a defamation claim in the Federal Court against Shanks, as well as Google for refusing to delete the videos.[45][46]

In June 2021, a friendlyjordies producer Kristo Langker was arrested by counter terrorism officers and charged with stalking Barilaro, prompted by Barilaro's complaints to the police;[47][48] he pleaded not guilty.[49] Police allege he followed Barilaro, repeatedly asking him why he was suing friendlyjordies. Video footage of the incident shows the producer attempting to return legal documents to Barilaro regarding the defamation suit.[50][51] The producer's lawyer, Mark Davis, states the video of the incident is not consistent with the police statement.[50] Several notable figures have used social media to accuse Barilaro of lying to the police regarding the statement.[52] Former Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd criticised Barilaro for "asking counterterrorism police to round ... up" people he does not like, categorising the friendlyjordies incidents as the typical harassment politicians should expect to face.[53] Others criticising the arrest include former Director of Public Prosecutions Nicholas Cowdery, politician Helen Dalton, journalist John Pilger, and Media Watch.[50][51][52]

Barilaro cited the ongoing defamation case as one of the reasons for his resignation in October 2021.[8] Barilaro settled his lawsuit against Shanks on 5 November 2021, with Shanks agreeing to apologise for the videos. Shanks was liable for $100,000 in legal costs in relation to an unsuccessful application to have the case heard by a jury, but Barilaro did not receive any money in the settlement.[54] His lawsuit against Google remained active.[55]

Personal life[edit]

Barilaro's father, Domenico, died in early 2020.[56] Barilaro's aunt, Maria Inzillo, and her husband, Damiani Nesci, died from COVID-19 in December 2020.[57]

In October 2021, Barilaro announced his separation from his wife of 26 years, Deanna; together they have three daughters.[1] In December 2021, it was revealed Barilaro was in a relationship with his former long-time media adviser and described uber-loyalist Jennifer Lugsdin.[58][59]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Barilaro quietly splits from wife Deanna". The Daily Telegraph.
  2. ^ Le Lievre, Kimberley (15 November 2016). "The Queanbeyan factory that produced a Nationals leader". Canberra Times.
  3. ^ "Government Notices (30)" (PDF). Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 2 April 2019. p. 1088-1090. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Premier announces new Cabinet" (Press release). Premier of New South Wales. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  5. ^ Han, Sophie (2 April 2019). "Berejiklian's new massive cabinet sworn in amid peals of laughter". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  6. ^ "The Hon. (John) Giovanni Domenic Barilaro, MP". Members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  7. ^ "Refreshed NSW cabinet sworn in". Sky News. Australia. AAP. 30 January 2017. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  8. ^ a b Tsikas, Mick (3 October 2021). "John Barilaro resigns as NSW Deputy Premier, will also leave Parliament". ABC News. AAP. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  9. ^ Smith, Alexandra (3 July 2020). "John Barilaro on cooking seafood and a pie shop accord". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 13 July 2020.
  10. ^ "Clr John Barilaro". Council Elected Members. Queanbeyan City Council. 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  11. ^ "John Barilaro – Candidate for Monaro". The Nationals team. National Party. 2011. Archived from the original on 18 February 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  12. ^ Green, Antony (1 April 2011). "Monaro". NSW Votes 2011. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2 April 2011.
  13. ^ "Steve Whan concedes defeat". ABC News. Australia. 29 March 2011. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  14. ^ Nicholls, Sean (17 October 2014). "John Barilaro elevated as Andrew Stoner suddenly quits cabinet". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 9 January 2015.
  15. ^ Hasham, Nicole (3 April 2015). "Premier Mike Baird's new NSW cabinet sworn in: Gladys Berejiklian and Gabrielle Upton first female Treasurer and Attorney-General". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 April 2015.
  16. ^ "John Barilaro elected as leader of NSW Nationals". ABC News. 15 November 2016. Retrieved 15 November 2016.
  17. ^ "Swearing-In of The Honourable Gladys Berejiklian MP, the 45th Premier of New South Wales, and The Honourable John Barilaro MP, Deputy Premier". Vice Regal Program. Governor of New South Wales. 23 January 2017. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017.
  18. ^ "Ministers". www.parliament.nsw.gov.au. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 27 January 2017.
  19. ^ Clennell, Andrew (26 January 2017). "Premier Gladys Berejiklian plans major reshuffle for cabinet". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 27 January 2017.
  20. ^ "'Turnbull is the problem': NSW Deputy Premier says PM must go". ABC News. 1 December 2017. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  21. ^ Sas, Nick (31 March 2019). "Gladys Berejiklian says Liberal Party has no women problem as re-elected NSW Premier shuffles Cabinet". ABC News. Australia. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  22. ^ "'The perception is horrible': Minister sprung staying at holiday house fined by police, Premier orders him back to Sydney". ABC News. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  23. ^ Channels, NSW Government Digital. "Please cancel travel to regional NSW | NSW Government". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  24. ^ Smith, Alexandra (7 May 2020). "'Gross hypocrisy': Barilaro accused of double standards over farm visit". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  25. ^ "NSW deputy premier spent weekend 'on the farm' despite telling public not to travel". the Guardian. 6 May 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  26. ^ "Police clear NSW Deputy Premier of breaching coronavirus restrictions on farm trip". ABC News. 7 May 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  27. ^ Eden-Monaro MP Mike Kelly resigns, prompting by-election ABC News 30 April 2020
  28. ^ Andrew Constance expected to announce run for Eden-Monaro seat ABC News 4 May 2020
  29. ^ You failed as a leader': Barilaro's message to McCormack Sydney Morning Herald 5 May 2020
  30. ^ "'Sorry for being a distraction': Barilaro apologises to Coalition MPs". SMH. 14 May 2020.
  31. ^ "'Bugger this for a joke': Constance reveals Barilaro slur played role in by-election U-turn". ABC News. 6 May 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  32. ^ Cockburn, Paige (11 September 2020). "NSW koala policy stoush between John Barilaro, Gladys Berejiklian ends with Coalition agreement remaining". ABC News. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  33. ^ "NSW 'koala war' flares as Gladys Berejiklian sacks parliamentary secretary for crossing floor | New South Wales politics | the Guardian".
  34. ^ "NSW koala policy reversed, Gladys Berejiklian sacks Catherine Cusack".
  35. ^ "Excitement-Builds-For-Mardi-Gras". 6 March 2021.
  36. ^ "Sydney-Mardi-Gras-at-SCG". Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
  37. ^ John Barilaro MP [@JohnBarilaroMP] (28 August 2020). "People call me 'Pork Barilaro', well I'll wear the title with a badge of honour. My focus is getting a fair share for our regional communities. #nswpol #auspol #bushsummit2020" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 28 August 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2021 – via Twitter.
  38. ^ "Pork barrelling is 'what elections are for': John Barilaro defends bushfire grants". The Guardian. 8 February 2021. Retrieved 3 May 2021.
  39. ^ Barilaro, John. "John Barilaro's valedictory speech".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  40. ^ "Berejiklian formally resigns but Holsworthy byelection still uncertain". Sydney Morning Herald. 1 January 2022. Retrieved 4 January 2022.
  41. ^ "NSW Deputy Premier threatens to sue YouTuber over allegedly racist, defamatory videos". www.9news.com.au. Retrieved 2 October 2021.
  42. ^ "The Italian job: Barilaro bowled over in spaghetti race". The Queanbeyan Age Chronicle. 22 November 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  43. ^ bruz (first disputed video)
  44. ^ "YouTuber Friendlyjordies lashed for 'racist' depiction of NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian and deputy John Barilaro". News.com.au. 21 June 2020. Archived from the original on 17 June 2021.
  45. ^ Bavas, Josh (28 May 2021). "NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro sues YouTube comedian Friendlyjordies and Google for defamation". ABC News. Archived from the original on 21 June 2021. Retrieved 5 June 2021.
  46. ^ McGowan, Michael (28 May 2021). "YouTube comedian Friendlyjordies sued for defamation by NSW deputy premier John Barilaro". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 June 2021.
  47. ^ Knaus, Christopher (14 June 2021). "Friendlyjordies producer charged with stalking John Barilaro". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 June 2021.
  48. ^ "Friendlyjordies arrest by NSW police fixated persons unit questioned by former top prosecutor". the Guardian. 17 June 2021. Retrieved 15 August 2021.
  49. ^ Mitchell, Georgina (24 June 2021). "'He's innocent': Friendlyjordies producer Kristo Langker pleads not guilty to stalking John Barilaro". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 June 2021.
  50. ^ a b c Knaus, Christopher (18 June 2021). "Friendlyjordies arrest by NSW police fixated persons unit questioned by former top prosecutor". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 18 June 2021.
  51. ^ a b "friendlyjordies arrest". Media Watch. 21 June 2021. Archived from the original on 21 June 2021.
  52. ^ a b Lynch, Jessica (15 June 2021). "People are rallying behind FriendlyJordies amid the Barilaro controversy". TheBrag. Archived from the original on 15 June 2021.
  53. ^ Rudd, Kevin (18 June 2021). "Why I donated to friendlyjordies' legal defence fund". KevinRudd.com. Archived from the original on 18 June 2021.
  54. ^ McKinnell, Jamie (5 November 2021). "Former deputy premier John Barilaro settles defamation suit against YouTube comedian". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 5 November 2021.
  55. ^ McGowan, Michael (5 November 2021). "Friendlyjordies defamation case: Jordan Shanks apologises to John Barilaro to settle claim". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 November 2021.
  56. ^ Weaver, Michael. "Barilaro will return to work on Wednesday amid NSW leadership chaos". About Regional. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  57. ^ Mitchell, Georgina (11 January 2021). "Barilaro reveals he lost two relatives to COVID-19 in Italy in December". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  58. ^ Brook, Samantha Hutchinson, Stephen (4 October 2021). "RIP Angus the pooch who brought paw and order to Sydney's elite". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 December 2021.
  59. ^ Sharp, Annette (10 December 2021). "Barilaro looks set for cosy Christmas with new love". Daily Telegraph.

External links[edit]

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for Monaro
2011–2021
Succeeded by
TBD
Political offices
Preceded by Deputy Premier of New South Wales
2014–2021
Succeeded by
Preceded by
himself
as Minister for Regional New South Wales)
Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade
2019–2021
Succeeded byas Minister for Regional New South Wales
Preceded byas Minister for Trade and Industry Succeeded byas Minister for Trade and Industry
Preceded by Minister for Small Business
2014–2019
Succeeded byas Minister for Finance and Small Business)
Preceded byas Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services Minister for Regional Development /
/ Minister for Regional New South Wales

2015–2019
Succeeded by
himself
as Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade
Vacant
Title last held by
Verity Firth
as Minister for Education and Training
Minister for Skills
2015–2019
Succeeded byas Minister for Skills and Tertiary Education
Preceded by Minister for Regional Tourism
2014–2015
Succeeded byas Minister for Trade, Tourism and Major Events
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the National Party of Australia – NSW
2016–2021
Succeeded by