John Blyth Barrymore

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
John Blyth Barrymore III
Born (1954-05-15) May 15, 1954 (age 62)
Beverly Hills, California
Nationality American
Occupation Actor
Known for Kung Fu

John Blyth Barrymore III (born May 15, 1954) is an American former film and television actor.

He is known for his role as Zeke in the 1970s television series Kung Fu, which was his first role on television.

Biography[edit]

John Blyth Barrymore III was born to John Drew Barrymore and Cara Williams.[1] As such, he is from the famous Barrymore family: He is the half-brother of American actress Drew Barrymore, as well as the grandnephew of Ethel Barrymore and Lionel Barrymore.[2] He is of partial Irish descent through his great-grandfather, actor Maurice Costello. John has stated that he does not remember if he has met his aunt Diana Barrymore, also an actress.[3]

Norman Abbott, the director of the television show The Munsters, requested that John play the role of Eddie Munster in the show. John's mother did not allow him to take the role, and in later years John thanked his mother for not allowing him to become a child actor.

Like his father, John has had a sporadic career in film and television, mainly appearing in shlock horror movies and comedies. John found himself homeless in 2012, though he was able to get a food stamps card. While on skid row, he took to wearing a shirt printed with "I'm Drew Barrymore's brother".[4][5][6]

After John's sister Jessica Barrymore was found dead in her vehicle in 2014, he publicly criticized half-sister Drew for not being receptive to forming a relationship with either him or Jessica.[7]

In 2017, he appeared in an hour-long episode of "Lasagna Cat", a parody of Jim Davis's comic-strip series Garfield, by Fatal Farm. His performance consisted of an hour long philisophical analysis of meaning behind a single Garfield comic strip. His performance was described as "bizarre" yet "inspiring".[8][9]

Career[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1967 Me and Benjy Petie
1975 Kung Fu Zeke
1976 Baby Blue Marine Idiot #2
1978 The One Man Jury Policeman
1978 Feedback Hoodlum
1979 Nocturna Punk vampire
1980 Lou Grant Harold Episode: "Cameras"
1981 Americana John/Jack
1981 Smokey Bites the Dust Harold
1981 Full Moon High Student
1982 Lou Grant Marc Pauley Episode: "Dogs"
1982 Trick or Treats Mad Doctor
1984 Hard to Hold Recording Engineer
1990 Cry-Baby N/A Uncredited additional voice
1990 Crazy People Additional voices
2017 "Lasagna Cat" Philosophical musings Episode: "07/27/1978"

Further reading[edit]

  • Pilato, Herbie J., The Kung Fu Book of Caine: The Complete Guide to TV's First Mystical Eastern Western. Boston: Charles A. Tuttle (1993); ISBN 0-8048-1826-6

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mank, Gregory William (2014). The Very Witching Time of Night: Dark Alleys of Classic Horror Cinema. McFarland. pp. 63–64. ISBN 978-0-7864-4955-2. 
  2. ^ Vare, Ethlie Ann (2011). Love Addict: Sex, Romance, and Other Dangerous Drugs. Health Communications, Inc. p. 136. ISBN 978-0-7573-1595-4. 
  3. ^ "Interview with Actor John Blyth Barrymore". Eerie Digest. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "Drew Barrymore's Brother on Welfare". Inside Edition. Feb 1, 2012. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  5. ^ "DREW BARRYMORE HAS A HALF BROTHER ON SKID ROW". Janet Charlton's Hollywood. Dec 7, 2011. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  6. ^ "Drew Barrymore Bans Family From Wedding". The Gossip Jacker. Jun 8, 2012. Archived from the original on 15 July 2015. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  7. ^ "Abandoned And Alone: Drew Barrymore Had Been 'Avoiding' Sister Jessica Before Her Tragic Death, Says Brother John". Radar Online. Aug 6, 2014. Retrieved 15 July 2015. 
  8. ^ "07/27/1978". YouTube. 2017-02-23. Retrieved 2017-02-23. 
  9. ^ "The Pipe Strip". Jessica Wyman. Retrieved 9 March 2017. 

External links[edit]