John Cabot University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
John Cabot University
JCU 40th anniversary logo.jpg
Type Private
Established 1972
President Franco Pavoncello[1]
Academic staff
139[2]
Students 1250[2]
Location Rome, Italy
Colors Blue and White         
Website johncabot.edu
A view of the Guarini Campus

John Cabot University is a small American liberal arts university in the Trastevere rione of Rome, Italy. It is named for the Venetian explorer Giovanni Caboto. It was established in 1972 as a split-off from the American University of Rome, and until about 1991 was known as John Cabot International College.[3]:461 About 66% of students are female.[2]

Degrees[edit]

The university offers associate and BA degrees in humanities subjects and in business administration.[4]:55 It also offers single courses in a variety of subjects including Italian cinema and language.[4]:55 Classes are taught in English.[2]

Accreditation[edit]

The university is accredited in the United States by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.[2] It was formerly academically associated with Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio.[5] Degrees in business administration, international affairs and public administration were formerly accredited by the University of Wales,[4]:55 which was abolished in 2011 after revelations of abusive accreditation.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Franco Pavoncello. John Cabot University. Accessed July 2016.[self-published source?]
  2. ^ a b c d e John Cabot University. Peterson's. Accessed July 2016.
  3. ^ Daniel N. Joudrey, Arlene G. Taylor, David P. Miller (2015) Introduction to cataloging and classification, eleventh edition. Santa Barbara, California: Libraries Unlimited. ISBN 9781598848571.
  4. ^ a b c Derek Bingham (2009). CIS Higher Education Directory 2010. Woodbridge: John Catt Educational Ltd. ISBN 9781904724698.
  5. ^ Karen Donley-Hayes (17 April 2015). Building A Frohring Legacy. Hiram Magazine. Hiram, Ohio: Hiram College. Accessed July 2016.
  6. ^ [s.n.] (21 October 2011). University of Wales effectively abolished in merger. BBC News. Accessed April 2016.