John Considine (actor)

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John William Considine III
Born (1935-01-02) January 2, 1935 (age 82)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Occupation
  • Actor
  • Writer
Years active 1960–2007
Spouse(s)
  • Toby Considine (m. 1957–76)
  • Jette Maguire (m. 1980–84)
  • Astrid Lee Peterson (m. 1984)
Family Tim Considine (brother)

John William Considine III (born January 2, 1935) is an American writer and actor who has made numerous appearances in film and television dating back more than five decades.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Considine was born in 1935 in Los Angeles to producer John Considine, Jr. His grandfathers were two pioneering vaudeville impresarios, Alexander Pantages and namesake John Considine, Sr.[1] He's the older brother of actor, writer and photographer Tim Considine and the paternal nephew of the late political reporter and newspaper columnist Bob Considine.

Career[edit]

Among the many television series on which Considine has appeared as a guest star are Straightaway, Sea Hunt, Ripcord, Combat!, My Favorite Martian, The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, Perry Mason, The F.B.I., Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Marcus Welby, M.D., The Rockford Files, Mannix, The Eddie Capra Mysteries, Lou Grant, Taxi, Hart to Hart, Remington Steele, Highway to Heaven, The Jeffersons, Hotel, MacGyver, Knight Rider, The A-Team, Simon & Simon, Murder She Wrote, L.A. Law and Boston Legal.

His film career included roles in The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), Doctor Death: Seeker of Souls (1973), The Thirsty Dead (1974), Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson (1976), Welcome to L.A. (1976), The Late Show (1977), When Time Ran Out (1980), Circle of Power (1981), Endangered Species (1982), Choose Me (1984), Trouble in Mind (1985), Fat Man and Little Boy (1989), Coupe de Ville (1990), Free Willy 2: The Adventure Home (1995) and The Book of Stars (1999).

He wrote the original screenplay for-and also appeared in-the Robert Altman film A Wedding (1978), and has also had acting roles on several daytime soap operas including Bright Promise (as Dr. Brian Walsh, 1971–72); The Young and the Restless (as Phillip Chancellor II, 1973–74); and two stints as different characters on Another World (as Vic Hastings, 1974–76, and as Reginald Love, 1986–88).[2]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Improvising: My Life and Show Business (S&L Enterprises, 2012).[2][3]
  • A War: A Boy's Struggle To Survive World War II in Beverly Hills (CreateSpace, 2013).[2]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]