John Cooper Wiley

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John Cooper Wiley, American diplomat, in 1936.

John Cooper Wiley (September 26, 1893 – February 3, 1967)[1] was a United States Foreign Service officer and ambassador.

Career[edit]

Wiley was born in Bordeaux, France while his father served there as U.S. Consul. He was educated by tutors, and studied at Union College, Columbia Law School, and Georgetown University Law Center. While at Union College he joined the Theta chapter of the Psi Upsilon fraternity.

He entered the United States Foreign Service in 1915 and served in several positions in Europe and South America. In 1938 he was the Chargé d'Affaires ad interim in Austria and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Latvia and Estonia. He went on to appointments as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Colombia, Portugal, Iran, and Panama.[1]

Retirement[edit]

He retired in 1953 and resided in the Georgetown area of Washington, D.C. He died in Washington on February 3, 1967. He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.[2]

Family[edit]

He was the son of Congressman John M. Wiley, and the grandson of John J. Cooper, who served as Indiana State Treasurer. John Cooper Wiley was married to Irena Monique Baruch (1906-1972), a well-known sculptor and portrait painter.

Footnotes[edit]