John DeWitt (athlete)

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John DeWitt
John DeWitt.jpg
Princeton Tigers
Position Guard
Class 1904
Career history
College Princeton (1901–1903)
High school Lawrenceville Prep
Personal information
Date of birth (1881-10-29)October 29, 1881
Place of birth Phillipsburg, New Jersey
Date of death July 28, 1930(1930-07-28) (aged 48)
Place of death New York, New York
Height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight 198 lb (90 kg)
Career highlights and awards
All-American (1902, 1903)
College Football Hall of Fame (1954)
John DeWitt
Medal record
Men’s athletics
Representing the  United States
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 1904 St Louis Hammer throw

John Riegel DeWitt (October 29, 1881 - July 28, 1930) was an American athlete, including a legendary college football player. As a track and field athlete, DeWitt competed mainly in the hammer throw.[1] He competed for the United States in the 1904 Summer Olympics held in St. Louis in the hammer throw where he won the silver medal.[2]

He was also a prominent guard and kicker for the Princeton Tigers football team.[3] In an attempt to name retroactive Heisman Trophy winners, Dewitt was awarded it for 1903.[4] Walter Camp placed him on an all-time All-America team.[5] One writer calls him Princeton's greatest football player.[6] He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matthews, George R. (1 January 2005). "America's First Olympics: The St. Louis Games Of 1904". University of Missouri Press – via Google Books. 
  2. ^ Call, The Morning. "John DeWitt: Two-time football All-American from Riegelsville won a silver in the 1904 Olympics". 
  3. ^ "John DeWitt Bio, Stats, and Results". 
  4. ^ http://www.footballfoundation.org/Portals/7/nff/file_file/2009_footballetter_issue_3.pdf
  5. ^ Camp, Walter (1 January 1910). "The Book of Foot-ball". Century Company – via Google Books. 
  6. ^ "Princeton Alumni Weekly". princeton alumni weekly. 1 January 1919 – via Google Books. 
  7. ^ Foundation, National Football. "National Football Foundation > Programs > College Football Hall of Fame > SearchDetail".