John Delaval, 1st Baron Delaval

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Lord Delaval

John Hussey Delaval, 1st Baron Delaval (17 March 1728 – 17 May 1808), known as Sir John Delaval, Bt, between 1761 and 1783, was an English landowner and politician.

Background and education[edit]

Delaval was the son of Francis Blake Delaval, who inherited estates at Ford Castle, Northumberland from his mother Mary, née Blake, and at Seaton Delaval, Northumberland from his uncle Admiral George Delaval (1660–1723). John's mother was Rhoda Apreece, through whom John inherited Doddington Hall, Lincolnshire. He was educated at Westminster School[1] and Pembroke College, Cambridge.[2] Delaval bought these estates from his elder brother Sir Francis Blake Delaval (1727–1791) in exchange for an annuity, and developed the farming resources at Ford and the coal and mineral resources at Seaton.

His sister was Rhoda Delaval,[3] an artist and wife of Edward Astley.[4]

Political career[edit]

Delaval served as Member of Parliament for Berwick on Tweed 1754–1761, 1765–1774 and 1780–1786. He was created a baronet, of Seaton Delaval in the County of Northumberland, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1761, and in 1783 he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Delaval, of Redford in the County of Wicklow.[5] In 1786 he was further honoured when he was made Lord Delaval, Baron of Delaval, in the County of Cumberland, in the Peerage of Great Britain.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Arms of Lord Delaval

Delaval's seat was at Seaton Delaval Hall, an 18th-century masterpiece by Sir John Vanbrugh. He married twice but his only son predeceased him aged just 19, and the baronetcy and baronies became extinct on his death. Lord Delaval gave artist William Bell his patronage, in return for a series of portraits painted of him and his family, and two views of Seaton Delaval Hall.[7] He bequeathed his estates of Seaton Delaval and Doddington to his brother Edward Hussey Delaval (1729-1814), and upon the death of Edward, Doddington passed to his wife and then to his daughter Sarah, Seaton Delaval passing to their kinsman Sir Jacob Astley of Melton Constable in Norfolk. John left his second wife Susannah Elizabeth a life interest in the Ford estate, and thereafter it was inherited by his granddaughter Susan. He was buried in St Paul's Chapel, Westminster Abbey.

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Delaval, John Hussey", Oxford DNB, 2004
  2. ^ "Delaval, John Blake (DLVL746JB)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  3. ^ H. H. E. Craster, M.A., Fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford (1909). History of Northumberland: The Parochial Chapelries of Earsdon and Horton. IX. Newcastle=Upon-Tyne: Andrew Reid & Company, Limited; London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Company, Limited. p. 173. Retrieved 12 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "Rhoda Delaval, Lady Astley (1725 - 1757)". National Trust Collections. Retrieved 12 March 2015. 
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12476. p. 1. 16 September 1783.
  6. ^ The London Gazette: no. 12775. p. 351. 5 August 1786.
  7. ^ BBC Your Paintings William Bell,

Sources[edit]

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Watson
Viscount Barrington
Member of Parliament for Berwick-upon-Tweed
1754–1761
With: Thomas Watson
Succeeded by
Thomas Watson
John Crauford
Preceded by
Thomas Watson
John Crauford
Member of Parliament for Berwick-upon-Tweed
January 1765–1774
With: Thomas Watson to December 1765
Wilmot Vaughan December 1765–1768
Robert Paris Taylor 1768–1774
Succeeded by
Jacob Wilkinson
John Vaughan
Preceded by
John Vaughan
Jacob Wilkinson
Member of Parliament for Berwick-upon-Tweed
1780–1786
With: John Vaughan
Succeeded by
Sir Gilbert Elliot, Bt
John Vaughan
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Baron Delaval
1783–1808
Extinct
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Delaval
1786–1808
Extinct