John Donvan

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John Donvan
Born 1955 (age 62–63)
Nationality American
Alma mater Columbia School of Journalism
Occupation Author, broadcaster, debate moderator
Years active 1977–present
Spouse(s) Dr. Ranit Mishori
Children 2

John Donvan (born 1955) is a four-time Emmy Award-winning journalist, broadcaster and debate moderator whose bestselling book, In a Different Key: The Story of Autism, was a Pulitzer Prize Finalist. He serves as host of the Intelligence Squared US, a debate series dedicated to raising the level of public discourse in America.

Early life[edit]

Donvan attended Regis High School in New York City.[1]

Career[edit]

Donvan is host of Intelligence Squared US, a forum that gathers together experts to debate propositions concerning serious topics of public interest in Oxford Union-style debates which may be heard on NPR, and on Fora.TV. In addition, Donvan is an avid storyteller, premiering his first one-man show Lose the Kid in Washington, DC in September 2013, under the auspices of SpeakeasyDC.[2]

In 2016, Donvan and Caren Zucker, a journalist and television news producer, co-authored In a Different Key: The Story of Autism.[3] Issues that they discuss include the Refrigerator mother theory and the possibility of an autism epidemic.[4] One autistic individual they cover in particular is Donald Triplett.[5][6][7] Another point they covered was psychiatrist Leo Kanner.[8] This book has additionally discussed the debate concerning the neurodiversity movement, especially with respect to low-functioning autistics.[4]

Awards[edit]

Donvan's broadcast work has won four Emmy Awards, several Overseas Press Club Awards, two Cine Golden Eagles, and has been honored by the National Association of Black Journalists, the Committee of 100, and the Media Action Network for Asian-Americans.[9][2]. As a writer, he was a named finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction for "In A Different Key: The Story of Autism," and also a finalist for the 2011 National Magazine Award for his profile of Donald Triplett, the first child officially diagnosed with autism. Both works were co-authored with Caren Zucker.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donvan, John (January 19, 2012). "Quizmaster Reflects On 50 Years Of 'It's Academic'". NPR. Retrieved August 5, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Believers in intelligent discussion". Intelligence Squared US. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  3. ^ Groopman, Jerome (January 26, 2016). "'In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,' by John Donvan and Caren Zucker". New York Times. Retrieved November 30, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b Siegel, Robert. "'In A Different Key' Traces History And Politics Of Autism". NPR.org. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  5. ^ Baron, Saskia (17 January 2016). "In a Different Key: The Story of Autism by John Donvan and Caren Zucker – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  6. ^ Miller, Laura (21 January 2016). "The Vindicated Parents". Slate. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  7. ^ News, A. B. C. (20 January 2016). "BOOK EXCERPT: 'In a Different Key' by John Donvan and Caren Zucker". ABC News. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  8. ^ Bauer, Ann (28 January 2016). "'In a Different Key': a cinematic, sweeping story of autism". The Washington Post. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 
  9. ^ News, A. B. C. (24 March 2010). "John Donvan". ABC News. Retrieved 19 March 2017. 

External links[edit]

Media offices
Preceded by
Brit Hume
ABC News Chief White House Correspondent
1996–1998
Succeeded by
Sam Donaldson