John Edson Sweet

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This photo of John E. Sweet appeared in Cassier's Magazine, April 1892.

John Edson Sweet (Pompey, New York, October 21, 1832 – Syracuse, New York, May 8, 1916) was an American mechanical engineer, inventor, professor, business man and president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1884-85. He is known for building the first micrometer caliper in 1873, for making tools, and for inventing the “straight line” engine.[1]

Biography[edit]

Born in Pompey, New York in 1832, Sweet got only some schooling at the district school. He started working young as a farm hand, became a carpenter's apprentice, and settled as architect and builder in the South.[2]

At the outbreak of the civil war in 1861 he returned to the North.[2] From 1862 to 1864 Sweet worked as mechanical draftsman in England, and back in the States was engaged in bridge building. He also made some inventions. At the Paris Exhibition of 1867 he had made quite an impression with the introduction of his linotype machine.[3]

From 1873 to 1878 het was Professor of practical mechanics at the Sibley College of Mechanic Arts of the Cornell University, where he also headed the Sibley College.[4] Afterwards he was founding president of straight line engine works.[5] At the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893 he was expert for the government, and one of the jurors on machine tools.[4]

John Edson Sweet (1832-1916)

In 1880 Sweet was a key founder of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and its third president in the year 1884–85. In 1914 the ASME awarded him the John Fritz Medal "for his achievements in machine design, and for his pioneer work in applying sound engineering principles to the construction and development of the high-speed steam engine." In 1914 he also received the honorary degree of Doctor of Engineering from the Syracuse University.[2]

Publications[edit]

Patents, a selection[6]
Publications about John Edson Sweet
  • "Dr. Sweet wins famous medal," in: Iron Trade Review, Vol 55. (1914), p. 1095
  • The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, "John Edson Sweet," in: Journal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Volume 38. 1916. p. 473-77
  • Albert William Smith. John Edson Sweet: A Story of Achievement in Engineering and of Influence Upon Men. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1925.

References[edit]

  1. ^ ASME History and Heritage (1980). Mechanical Engineers in America Born Prior to 1861: A Biographical Dictionary. New York: ASME. Library of Congress No. 79-57364.
  2. ^ a b c American Society of Mechanical Engineers, "John Edson Sweet," Journal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Volume 38. 1916. p. 483
  3. ^ Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr. The Metallurgic Age: The Victorian Flowering of Invention and Industrial Science. 2005. p. 32.
  4. ^ a b "John Edson Sweet, Once Cornell Professor, Dead," The Cornell Daily Sun, Volume XXXVI, Number 162, 9 May 1916
  5. ^ "Dr. Sweet wins famous medal," in: Iron Trade Review, Vol 55. (1914), p. 1095
  6. ^ For more patents, see heer

External links[edit]