John Elliot (author)

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John Elliot
Born (1918-07-04)4 July 1918
Castle Hill, England
Died 14 August 1997(1997-08-14) (aged 79)
Clifton, England
Occupation Screenwriter and television producer.
Period 1954–1993
Genre Drama, adventure, science fiction

John Herbert Elliot (4 July 1918 – 14 August 1997) was a British novelist, screenwriter and television producer.[1] Between 1954 and 1960 he scripted a succession of one-off television plays including War in the Air and A Man from the Sun. In 1961 he joined with astronomer Fred Hoyle (to ensure scientific authenticity) to write the ground-breaking science fiction serial A for Andromeda which set the tone for all which was to follow in its stead. The success of A For Andromeda prompted a sequel, The Andromeda Breakthrough, in 1962.[2]

Following Andromeda, Elliot wrote more one-off plays, but his talents were underused by the BBC. He resigned from the BBC in 1963 but, as a parting gift, offered an option on his concept for the drama series Mogul (renamed The Troubleshooters from the second series) for which he wrote much of the seven series.[3]

His other works include programmes such as Fall of Eagles and Survival as well as novels including Duel, Blood Upon the Snow, and A For Andromeda and The Andromeda Breakthrough (also co-written with Fred Hoyle).

Writing credits[edit]

Production Notes Broadcaster
War in the Air
  • 15 episodes (1954–1955)
BBC1
A Man from the Sun
  • Television film (1956)
BBC1
Television Playwright
  • "High Fidelity" (1959)
BBC1
Who Pays the Piper?
  • Television film (1960)
BBC1
BBC Sunday-Night Play
  • "Off Centre" (1961)
BBC1
They Met in a City
  • "Ladies from a Spa" (1961)
BBC1
A for Andromeda BBC1
The Andromeda Breakthrough
  • 6 episodes (co-written with Fred Hoyle, 1962)
BBC1
Maigret
  • "Death in Mind" (1962)
BBC1
First Night
  • "The Youngest Profession" (1963)
  • "Hunt the Man" (1964)
BBC1
Love Story
  • "The Truth Game" (1964)
ITV
Z-Cars
  • "A Morning's Sport" (1965)
BBC1
Mogul
  • 20 episodes (1965–1970)
BBC1
Rainbow City
  • "What Sort of a Boy?" (1967)
  • "Why You Marry?" (1967)
  • "A Better Fortune" (1967)
  • "Always on Sunday" (1967)
BBC1
A Stranger on the Hills
  • Television film (1970)
BBC1
BBC Play of the Month
  • "Platonov" (1971)
BBC1
Brett
  • "The Saxby Route" (1971)
BBC1
Play for Today
  • "Better Than the Movies" (1972)
  • "The Chief Mourner" (1979)
BBC1
The Shadow of the Tower
  • "The White Hart" (1972)
BBC2
Shelley
  • Television film (1972)
BBC2
The Fox
  • Television film (1973)
BBC2
Fall of Eagles
  • Television miniseries (1974)
BBC1
The Double Dealers
  • "Come in Number One" (1974)
BBC2
The Madness
  • Television film (1976)
BBC2
According to Hoyle
  • Television film (1977)
BBC2
A Life at Stake
  • "So, Who's Sick?" (1978)
BBC
Spy!
  • "The Murder Machine" (1980)
  • "The Venlo Incident" (1980)
BBC1
Escape
  • "Hijack to Mogadishu" (1980)
BBC2
The Brack Report
  • "Chapter 3" (1982)
  • "Chapter 4" (1982)
  • "Chapter 9" (1982)
ITV
Man-Eaters of India
  • Television film (1986)
BBC
Flying for Fun: An Affair with an Aeroplane
  • Television film (1987)
BBC1
A Chance to Dance
  • Television film (1993)
ITV

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Work Category Result Reference
1971 British Academy Television Awards The Troubleshooters Shell International Award Won

Books by John Elliot[edit]

  • A for Andromeda (1962), Souvenir Press, ISBN 978-0-285-63588-3
  • MOGUL: The Making of a Myth (1970), Barrie & Jenkins, SBN 214-65078-2

Further reading[edit]

  • MacKenzie, S. (2006), "War in the Air : Churchill, the Air Ministry and the BBC response to Victory at Sea", Contemporary British History [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2ba0bb2503
  2. ^ http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/453217/
  3. ^ http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/518529/

External links[edit]