John Engels

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John Engels (January 19, 1931 South Bend, Indiana - June 13, 2007 Vermont) was an American poet.[1]

Life[edit]

John Engels graduated from University of Notre Dame in 1952. After Navy service, Engels studied at the University College, Dublin, then graduated from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, with an M.F.A. in 1957. He taught at St. Norbert College, and Saint Michael's College, Sweet Briar College, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Middlebury College, and Emory University, and the University of Alabama. In 1995, he was Wyndham Robertson Chair at Hollins College.[2]

Engels' work appeared in Harper's,[3] the New Yorker, [4][5] and many other prestigious journals.

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

  • "Adam After the Ice Storm", Poetry Foundation
  • "Love Poem--Describing the Austere Comfort of the Dream in Which Nothing Is Named", Ploughshares, Spring 1977
  • The Homer Mitchell place: poems. University of Pittsburgh Press. 1968.
  • Blood Mountain. University of Pittsburgh Press. 1977. ISBN 978-0-8229-3289-5.
  • Weather-fear: new and selected poems, 1958-1982. University of Georgia Press. 1983. ISBN 978-0-8203-0654-4.
  • Cardinals in the Ice Age: poems. Graywolf Press. 1987. ISBN 978-0-915308-91-0.
  • Big water: poems. Globe Pequot. 1995. ISBN 978-1-55821-358-6.
  • Sinking creek: poems. Globe Pequot. 1998. ISBN 978-1-55821-638-9.
  • House and garden. University of Notre Dame Press. 2001. ISBN 978-0-268-03056-8.
  • Recounting the seasons: poems, 1958-2005. University of Notre Dame Press. 2006. ISBN 978-0-268-02770-4.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Huddle, David (1 June 2008). "The Life of a Poet: John Engels, for Example". Hollins Critic. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-11-03. Retrieved 2009-09-21.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "John Engels | Harper's Magazine". Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  4. ^ "The New Yorker Digital Edition : Mar 29, 1982". archives.newyorker.com. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  5. ^ "The New Yorker Digital Edition : Apr 27, 1981". archives.newyorker.com. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  6. ^ "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation | John Engels". www.gf.org. Retrieved September 7, 2016.

External links[edit]