John F. Murphy (JAG)

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John F. Murphy
John Murphy, chief prosecutor for the Office of Military Commissions addresses reporters -a.jpg
John Murphy, chief prosecutor for the Office of Military Commissions addresses reporters.
Known for Prosecutor

John Murphy is an American lawyer and officer in the United States Naval Reserve.[1]

Andy Worthington reported on May 6, 2009, that Murphy was replacing Lawrence Morris as Chief Prosecutor of the Guantanamo military commissions, and that Morris was retiring from active duty.[1]

On December 12, 2008, while Murphy was an assistant Prosecutor in United States v. Omar Khadr, he had to present the case because lead Prosecutor Major Jeffrey Groharing was not present.[2]

On August 9, 2009, Fox News reported that Murphy stated the Prosecution would comply with new rules barring the use of evidence obtained by torture, or cruel, inhumane interrogation techniques.[3]

According to Carol Rosenberg, writing in the Lakeland Ledger, on July 15, 2009 Murphy told the Press that his office plans to charge 66 Guantanamo detainees, in the Guantanamo military commissions system.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Andy Worthington (2009-05-06). "Breaking: New Chief Prosecutor Tapped For Military Commissions At Guantanamo". Alternet. Archived from the original on 2009-05-07. 
  2. ^ Vaughn R. Larson (2008-12-12). "Unanswered Questions" (PDF). 9 (43). The Wire (JTF-GTMO). pp. 17, 20. Retrieved 2009-05-30. 
  3. ^ "Afghanistan Jail Conditions Hamper Guantanamo Prosecutions". Fox News. 2009-08-09. Retrieved March 2011. The chief Guantanamo war crimes prosecutor, Navy Capt. John F. Murphy, declined to discuss any specific case but said his team would follow the new rules. "We will introduce no evidence that's obtained by torture, no cruel, inhumane or degrading evidence," he said.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  4. ^ Carol Rosenberg (2009-07-15). "Pentagon Presses Ahead With War Court". The Ledger. Archived from the original on 2009-07-28. Retrieved 2009-07-28. The Pentagon's chief war crimes prosecutor, Navy Capt. John Murphy, said the war crimes prosecutor was preparing 'about 66 cases.'