John Farnworth

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John Farnworth
1 john farnworth.jpg
Farnworth performing in Singapore in 2011, where he broke two records
Born 1986 (age 30–31)
Longridge, Lancashire, England
Nationality British
Known for football freestyler

John Farnworth (born 1986) is a football freestyler and entertainer.[1] He holds four Guinness World Records including the most around the worlds in under a minute [2]

Biography[edit]

John Farnworth was born in Longridge, and grew up in Preston. He apprenticed as footballer in the youth teams of Preston North End, yet John is a Manchester United supporter.

Farnworth's grandfather played for Accrington Stanley & Burnley FC wanted to sign him. John's Grandfather went on to be a Headteacher & one of 150 invited to Buckingham Palace.

At the age of 14, he read Simon Clifford's Learn to play the Brazilian Way and, giving up professional football aspirations, started to practice the freestyle skills that were illustrated in the book. After a year of training, Farnworth joined one of the Clifford-franchised Brazilian Soccer Schools, in Manchester. The schools' Futebol de Salão use a size-two weighted ball which aids and improves skilful play.

He went to St Cecilia's School in Longridge & Newman College Preston - where he performed at every opportunity he got. Both school & college supported John's ambitions.

John presently holds eight Guinness World Records, has travelled the world performing & presenting motivational talks. John is a regular on the BBC.....

Career[edit]

In 2004, John Farnworth met with football performer Mr Woo who invited him to his exhibition contest in London, which Farnworth won through the guidance of David Ward. The win brought him media exposure in the United Kingdom and abroad and Farnworth started touring, exhibiting his skills. In December 2006, he competed in the "Masters of The Game" tournament and won by defeating his teacher and idol Mr Woo.

He is now a freestyle professional, participating in exhibitions,[3] openings of soccer schools,[4] sports games entertainment [5] and various contests. He is also involved in coaching, corporate events and TV advertisements, he has also recently won the eurobac beating many of the best freestylers around the world. A demonstration by Farnworth inspired a young Indi Cowie to take up freestyle football.[6]

He appeared in the Huddersfield Town 2009/2010 kit commercial alongside other players from the squad and has been a part of the halftime entertainment a few times as well.

Farnworth participated in the 2009 series of Britain's Got Talent, where he passed the first round, but failed to make it to the live semi finals.

In 2010 he appeared as a mystery guest on Russell Howard's Good News and in 2011 he ran the London Marathon and now holds the record for successfully completing the race while doing continuous kickups.

In January 2013 John Farnworth also appeared as a personal injury claimant in the Claims TV video 'John Farnworth uses Claims TV'. This is a comedy video based around a client (John Farnworth) being involved in an accident and is now suffering from 'Keepy-Up Syndrome'.

Farnworth also makes guest appearances on Match of the Day Kickabout, showing his skills and tricks.

During 2014 John Farnworth made several appearances in support of Football Flick, a popular skill training unit. Recent appearances see John participating in weekly installments dubbed 'Trickster Tuesday'.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Keeping uppie with Freestyling World Champ". BBC. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  2. ^ "Most ball control tricks in one minute, 'around the world'". Guinness World Records. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  3. ^ "Brazilian Soccer School launched at Hatfield Leisure Centre". Fitness Leisu Partnership. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  4. ^ "Soccer Samba". BBC. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  5. ^ "Round the World Record with soccer freestyler and Leeds Carnegie". Leeds Metropolitan University. Retrieved 2008-04-19. 
  6. ^ Crothers, Tim (25 March 2011). "A Soccer Phenom Puts the 'I' in Team". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 May 2015. 

External links[edit]