John Fonville

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John Fonville is a flutist and composer. Fonville specializes in extended techniques on the flute, especially microtonality, and performs on instruments including a complete set of quarter tone (Kingma system) flutes.[1][2][3] He has premiered works by composers including Ben Johnston, Salvatore Martirano, Joji Yuasa, Roger Reynolds, Hiroyuki Itoh, and Paul Koonce.[2] He is a member of the Tone Road Ramblers, the Eolus Quintet, and the UCSD Department of Music's Performance Lab.[2] He is the author of Microtonal Fingerings for Flute (1987), A Pedagogical Approach to the Flute Etudes of Joachim Andersen (1981), and "Ben Johnston's Extended Just Intonation- A Guide for Interpreters" (1991).

John Fonville is the flute player, and is listed as such, on the recording credits for the theme song of the movie "Shaft", recorded by Isaac Hayes in 1971 at Stax Studio, Memphis, TN. This is the version used for the 50th anniversary celebration recording in 2007.[citation needed]

AllMusic's François Couture describes Fonville as, "one of the strongest contemporary flutists."[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kingma System Flutists", BrannenFlutes.com.
  2. ^ a b c "John Fonville", Music.UCSD.edu. Accessed September 05, 2014.
  3. ^ Cindy Ying Shiung (2007). The Brannen-Cooper Kingma System Flute: A Resource Thesaurus of Multiphonic Production Capability, p.3, 24, & 104. ISBN 9780549400455.
  4. ^ Couture, François. "John Fonville: Living in Fire" at AllMusic. Retrieved September 05, 2014.

Further reading[edit]

  • La Berge, Anne. 2001. "Mongrel Tuning: The Temperamental Flute". In The Ratio Book: A Documentation of the Ratio Symposium, Royal Conservatory, The Hague, 14–16 December 1992, edited by Clarence Barlow, 44–48. Feedback Papers 43. Cologne: Feedback Studio.
  • Perlove, Nina, and Sophie Cherrier. 1998. "Transmission, Interpretation, Collaboration: A Performer's Perspective on the Language of Contemporary Music: An Interview with Sophie Cherrier". Perspectives of New Music 36, no. 1 (Winter): 43–58.