John Frederick Adair

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John Frederick Adair (20 January 1852 – 1 April 1913) was an Irish mathematician and physicist who taught in England and Australia. He was a keen cricketer who played first class cricket for Cambridge University in 1875.

Life and career[edit]

Adair was born at St Stephen's Green, Dublin, the son of John Adair, lawyer of Dublin. He studied at Trinity College Dublin being scholar in 1871 and being awarded BA in mathematics in 1873.[1] In 1874 he was admitted at Pembroke College, Cambridge where he became a scholar and was awarded BA in mathematics (7th Wrangler) in 1878.[2] From 1878–1879 he was an assistant master at Derby School.[1] From 1887 to 1890 he was demonstrator in physics at the University of Sydney.[2] Adair died at Ballsbridge, County Dublin, Ireland at the age of 61.

Cricket[edit]

John Frederick Adair
Cricket information
RoleOccasional wicket-keeper
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1875Cambridge University
First-class debut6 May 1875 England XI v Cambridge University
Last First-class27 May 1875 Cambridge University v MCC
Career statistics
Competition First-class
Matches 2
Runs scored 31
Batting average 31.00
100s/50s
Top score 17
Balls bowled
Wickets
Bowling average
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling
Catches/stumpings 2/-
Source: [1], 3 March 2011

Adair played cricket for Trinity College, Dublin between 1870 and 1874. [3] While at Derby school he played one cricket match for Derbyshire against their Colts. He also played for I Zingari.[3] In 1874 he was admitted at Pembroke College, Cambridge,[1] and while at Cambridge played one cricket match for Cambridge University and one against the University for an England XI led by WG Grace.[3] In 1883 Adair played cricket for Ireland.[3]

Papers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Adair, John Frederick (ADR874JF)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  2. ^ a b Adair, John Frederick (1851 - 1913) Encyclopedia of Australian Science 2015
  3. ^ a b c d John Adair at Cricket Archive

External links[edit]