John Garrett (ice hockey)

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John Garrett
Born (1951-06-17) June 17, 1951 (age 65)
Trenton, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Goaltender
Caught Left
Played for AHL
Richmond Robins
Fredericton Express
WHA
Minnesota Fighting Saints
Toronto Toros
Birmingham Bulls
New England Whalers
NHL
Hartford Whalers
Quebec Nordiques
Vancouver Canucks
NHL Draft 38th overall, 1971
St. Louis Blues
Playing career 1971–1985

John Murdoch Garrett (born June 17, 1951 in Trenton, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey goaltender and television sports commentator.

Biography[edit]

Playing career[edit]

Originally selected in the 1971 NHL Entry Draft by the St. Louis Blues, Garrett played one year for the Blues' Central Hockey League affiliate before joining the Portland Buckaroos of the Western Hockey League for half a season and then moving on to the Richmond Robins of the American Hockey League. He signed with the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the World Hockey Association in 1973-74. He would play with the Fighting Saints until leaving the team Feb. 25, 1976. He then signed with the Toronto Toros, and would follow the Toros franchise when it relocated to Birmingham. In the final WHA season, Garrett was traded to the New England Whalers, and would remain with the franchise when it entered the NHL. He holds the record for the most wins by any goalie in WHA history. Garrett would also play for the Quebec Nordiques and Vancouver Canucks of the NHL before retiring at the start of the 85-86 season.

John Garrett was involved in one of the oddest scenarios in the history of the NHL All-Star Game. Replacing an injured Richard Brodeur, the Vancouver Canucks only representative at the 1983 All-Star game that year, John Garrett was voted the game's MVP before the end of the game. After Wayne Gretzky scored four times in the last ten minutes, a re-vote was held and Gretzky was named the All-Star Game MVP.

Broadcasting career[edit]

Garrett retired at the start of the 85-86 season and worked that season as the Vancouver Canucks assistant general manager. He then began his broadcasting career in 1986-87. He worked as a colour commentator on CBC's Hockey Night in Canada. Within a few years, he was considered a valuable member of the team and was assigned his first conference final in 1991—his first of eight in a row. During that time, he was also a colour commentator on Edmonton Oilers local telecasts, working along with Bruce Buchanan. He left CBC in 1998 to join the fledgling CTV Sportsnet (now Rogers Sportsnet). He worked as a studio analyst on national broadcasts, as well as the colour commentator for the Calgary Flames games on Sportsnet West. During the 1994 NHL Lockout, he briefly worked for United Parcel Service of Canada in Vancouver.

Since the 2002–03 season, Garrett has served as the colour commentator for Canucks games on Sportsnet Pacific, first being partnered with Jim Hughson and later John Shorthouse. He also had occasional network assignments on HNIC and, since Rogers acquired the Canadian national contract for the NHL in 2014, he sometimes gets network assignments on either Sportsnet or City.

Nicknames[edit]

After the 1984-85 season Garrett earned the nickname "Lotto" because his high goals against average of 6.49 was the same as Canada's national lottery, Lotto 6/49.

Garrett picked up his Cheech nickname from teammate Rick Smith in the mid seventies. His afro haircut and moustache made him resemble Cheech from comedy-duo Cheech and Chong.

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1969–70 Peterborough Petes OHA-Jr. 48 2850 142 3 2.99
1970–71 Peterborough Petes OHA-Jr. 51 3062 151 5 2.96
1971–72 Kansas City Blues CHL 35 13 14 7 2041 121 3 3.55
1972–73 Portland Buckaroos WHL 17 6 8 2 951 52 2 3.28 .899
1972–73 Richmond Robins AHL 37 2138 117 0 3.26
1973–74 Minnesota Fighting Saints WHA 40 21 18 0 2290 137 1 3.59 .903
1974–75 Minnesota Fighting Saints WHA 58 30 23 2 3294 180 2 3.28 .905
1975–76 Minnesota Fighting Saints WHA 52 26 22 4 3179 177 2 3.34 .898
1975–76 Toronto Toros WHA 9 3 6 0 551 33 1 3.59 .905
1976–77 Birmingham Bulls WHA 65 24 34 4 3803 224 4 3.53 .899
1977–78 Birmingham Bulls WHA 58 24 31 1 3306 210 2 3.81 .877
1978–79 New England Whalers WHA 41 20 17 4 2496 149 2 3.58 .874
1979–80 Hartford Whalers NHL 52 16 24 11 3046 202 0 3.98 .865
1980–81 Hartford Whalers NHL 54 15 27 12 3152 241 0 4.59 .870
1981–82 Hartford Whalers NHL 16 5 6 4 898 63 0 4.21 .872
1981–82 Quebec Nordiques NHL 12 4 5 3 720 62 0 5.17 .837
1982–83 Quebec Nordiques NHL 17 6 8 2 953 64 0 4.03 .874
1982–83 Vancouver Canucks NHL 17 7 6 3 934 48 1 3.08 .905
1983–84 Vancouver Canucks NHL 29 14 10 2 1653 113 0 4.10 .851
1984–85 Vancouver Canucks NHL 10 1 5 0 407 44 0 6.49 .819
1985–86 Fredericton Express AHL 3 2 1 0 179 9 0 3.02 .894
WHA totals 323 148 151 15 18,919 1110 14 3.52 .894
NHL totals 207 68 91 37 11,763 837 1 4.27 .866

Playoffs[edit]

Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1969–70 Peterborough Petes OHA-Jr. 6 2 4 0 360 21 0 3.50
1969–70 Montreal Jr. Canadiens M-Cup 9 7 1 371 19 0 3.07
1970–71 Peterborough Petes OHA-Jr. 5 0 3 2 298 22 0 4.43
1972–73 Richmond Robins AHL 3 0 3 123 17 0 8.29
1973–74 Minnesota Fighting Saints WHA 7 4 2 372 25 0 4.03 .902
1974–75 Minnesota Fighting Saints WHA 12 6 6 726 41 1 3.39 .899
1977–78 Birmingham Bulls WHA 5 1 4 271 26 0 5.76
1978–79 New England Whalers WHA 8 4 3 447 32 0 4.30
1979–80 Hartford Whalers NHL 1 0 1 60 8 0 8.00 .800
1981–82 Quebec Nordiques NHL 5 3 2 323 21 0 3.90 .866
1982–83 Vancouver Canucks NHL 1 1 0 60 4 0 4.00 .867
1983–84 Vancouver Canucks NHL 2 0 0 18 0 0 0.00 1.000
WHA totals 32 15 15 1816 124 1 4.10
NHL totals 9 4 3 461 33 0 4.30 .858

References[edit]

External links[edit]