John Godwin and Gillian Hopwood

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John Godwin (OFR, OBE) and Gillian Hopwood (MFR) are English architects, based in Nigeria.

Career[edit]

John and Gillian were born in England in 1928 and in 1927 respectively. They both studied architecture at the Architectural Association in London, both qualifying in 1950.[1] John came to Nigeria with his wife, Gillian in 1954, residing in colonial Lagos, British Nigeria.[2] They began their careers in architecture and were involved in designing many significant projects in the city. John also established an academic career as a Professor of Architecture at the University of Lagos.[3] Although he collaborated with his wife on many projects, Gillian focused in historic preservation and architectural photography and documented several iconic buildings which existed in colonial Lagos (some of which have been demolished).[2][4][5] They established their architectural firm named Godwin and Hopwood Architects in 1954. The firm’s name was later changed to Godwin Hopwood Kuye (GHK) Architects Limited in 1989. The couples became Nigerian citizens in 2013 after spending about 60 years living and practicing as architects in Nigeria.[6]

Projects[edit]

  • Allen and Hanbury House, Lagos[7][8]
  • WAEC building, Yaba, Lagos
  • Bookshop House, Lagos
  • Niger House, Lagos
  • Nestle Nigeria Plc Water Plant, Lagos.
  • Faculty of Sciences building, University of Lagos
  • GlaxoSmith Headquarters building, Lagos.
  • Boyle street residential building, Lagos. [9][10]
  • Bishop Court Building, Ikeja, Lagos

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Okechukwu Uwaezuoke (27 January 2015). "A City of Motion". ThisDay. Archived from the original on 3 October 2015. Retrieved 29 September 2015.
  2. ^ a b "GILLIAN HOPWOOD: CHRONICLES OF A CITY IN TRANSITION". Thisday live. 22 March 2015. Archived from the original on 3 October 2015. Retrieved 29 September 2015.
  3. ^ Matthew Gandy. The Fabric of Space: Water, Modernity, and the Urban Imagination. MIT Press, 2014. ISBN 9780262028257.
  4. ^ Tajudeen Sowole (5 April 2015). "Hopwood's Lens Zooms On Comparative Lagos Architecture". Nigeria: TheGuardian.
  5. ^ Ozolua Uhakheme. "'The Lagos I miss'". The Nation. Retrieved 29 September 2015.
  6. ^ Victor akande (12 February 2013). "Just before the sea takes over Lagos". the nation.
  7. ^ James Madge; Andrew Peckham (2006). Narrating Architecture: A Retrospective Anthology. Routledge. p. 389. ISBN 9781134189663.
  8. ^ John Julius Norwich (1975). Great Architecture of the World. A Da Capo Press (Perseus Books Group). p. 271. ISBN 9780306804366.
  9. ^ James Madge; Andrew Peckham (2006). Narrating Architecture: A Retrospective Anthology. Routledge. ISBN 9781134189663.
  10. ^ The Architects' Journal, Volume 217. Architectural Press Limited (University of Michigan). 2003.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]