John Hickton

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John Hickton
Personal information
Date of birth (1944-09-24) 24 September 1944 (age 72)
Place of birth Chesterfield, England
Playing position Striker
Youth career
Sheffield Wednesday
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1963–1966 Sheffield Wednesday 53 (21)
1966–1978 Middlesbrough 415 (159)
1976–1977 Hull City (loan) 6 (1)
1978 Fort Lauderdale Strikers 3 (1)
Whitby Town
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

John Hickton (born 24 September 1944) is an English former professional footballer who played in the Football League as a striker for Sheffield Wednesday, Middlesbrough and Hull City, and in the North American Soccer League for Fort Lauderdale Strikers.[1] He is noted for his prolific scoring for Middlesbrough between 1966 and 1976.

Hickton was born in Brimington, near Chesterfield in Derbyshire.[1] He started his career at Sheffield Wednesday, and made his debut in the Football League First Division on 7 March 1964 in a 2–2 draw away to Aston Villa. He went on to score 21 goals from 56 appearances,[2] which caught the eye of Middlesbrough manager Stan Anderson, who took Hickton to Teesside in 1966.

Hickton was a goalscoring legend at Middlesbrough where he scored 192 goals in 10 years at the club, making nearly 500 appearances.[3] As of 2009, he ranked fourth in the club's all-time goalscorers list and third in terms of appearances,[4] behind George Camsell, George Elliott and Brian Clough, and Tim Williamson and Gordon Jones respectively.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "John Hickton". UK A–Z Transfers. Neil Brown. Retrieved 20 December 2009. 
  2. ^ "John Hickton". The Sheffield Wednesday Archive. Adrian Bullock. Retrieved 18 December 2009. 
  3. ^ Struthers, Greg (3 April 2005). "Caught in Time: Middlesbrough win the Second Division, 1974". The Sunday Times. Retrieved 16 December 2009. 
  4. ^ "Heroes:John Hickton 1966–78". Middlesbrough F.C. Retrieved 20 December 2009. 

External links[edit]