John J. De Haven

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John J. de Haven
J J de Haven 001.jpg
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California
In office
June 8, 1897 – January 26, 1913
Appointed by William McKinley
Preceded by William W. Morrow
Succeeded by Maurice Timothy Dooling
Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court
In office
December 18, 1890 – January 7, 1895
Preceded by Charles N. Fox
Succeeded by Frederick W. Henshaw
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 1st congressional district
In office
March 4, 1889 – October 1, 1890
Preceded by Thomas L. Thompson
Succeeded by Thomas J. Geary
Member of the California State Senate
from the Humboldt County district
In office
1871–1875
Member of the California State Assembly
from the Humboldt County district
In office
1869–1871
Personal details
Born (1849-03-12)March 12, 1849
St. Joseph, Missouri, U.S.
Died January 26, 1913(1913-01-26) (aged 63)
Yountville, California
Resting place Mount Olivet Cemetery
Spouse(s) Zeruiah Jane Ball (m. 1872)

John Jefferson De Haven (March 12, 1849 – January 26, 1913) was a U.S. Representative, United States federal judge from California, and an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court.

Biography[edit]

Born in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri, De Haven moved to California in 1853 with his parents, who settled in Humboldt County.[1] He became a printer, and pursued that vocation for four years before studying law.[2] In August 1865, he was a delegate from Humboldt County to the Union party state convention.[3] He was admitted to the bar of the district court in Humboldt in 1866 and commenced practice at Eureka, California from 1866 to 1867.[4] He was a District attorney of Humboldt County, California from 1867 to 1869.[5]

After entering the bar, De Haven held a series of public offices. He was a state representative from Humboldt County from 1869 to 1871 in the California State Assembly, and a California state senator from 1871 to 1875.[6][7] He returned to private practice in Eureka from 1875 to 1884. He was the City attorney there from 1878 to 1880.[4] He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1882 to the Forty-eighth Congress.[8][9] He was a judge to the Humboldt County Superior Court from 1884 to 1889.[10][11]

In November 1888, De Haven was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-first Congress from the First District, and served from March 4, 1889, until October 1, 1890, when he resigned.[12][13]

He was an Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court from December 18, 1890, to January 7, 1895, filling the unexpired term of Charles N. Fox.[14] In June 1894, he lost a bid for renomination at the Republican convention.[15][16] After stepping down from the court, he returned to private practice in Eureka between 1895 and 1897.

On June 1, 1897, President William McKinley nominated De Haven to a seat on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California vacated by William W. Morrow, who became a Circuit Judge.[17] De Haven was confirmed as a federal judge by the United States Senate on June 8, 1897, and received commission the same day.[18] He served on the federal bench until his death on January 26, 1913.[19] His vacant seat was filled by the appointment of Maurice Timothy Dooling.[20] De Haven died in Yountville, California and was interred in Mount Olivet Cemetery, San Francisco, California.[21][22][23]

Personal life[edit]

On June 24 1872, he married Zeruiah Jane Ball (January 3, 1848 – January 23, 1918) in Humboldt, California.[24] They had a daughter, Sadie De Haven, and son, Joseph J. De Haven.[25]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Johnson, J. Edward (1963). History of the California Supreme Court: The Justices 1850-1900, vol 1 (PDF). San Francisco, CA: Bender Moss Co. pp. 175–177. Retrieved August 14, 2017. 
  2. ^ "End Comes to Judge De Haven". San Francisco Call (113 (58)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 27 January 1913. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Union State Judicial Convention". Sacramento Daily Union (29 (4495)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 18 August 1865. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Shuck, Oscar Tully (1901). History of the bench and bar of California: being biographies of many remarkable men, a store of humorous and pathetic recollections, accounts of important legislation and extraordinary cases, comprehending the judicial history of the state. Los Angeles, CA: The Commercial printing house. p. 658. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  5. ^ "Humboldt Union Convention". Sacramento Daily Union (33 ( 5093)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 25 July 1867. p. 2. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  6. ^ "California Legislature". Sacramento Daily Union (38 (5833)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 7 December 1869. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  7. ^ "The Republican Rally of the Campaign". Russian River Flag (49). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 17 October 1872. p. 2. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  8. ^ "Trinity Republicans". Sacramento Daily Union (15 (145)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 9 August 1882. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  9. ^ "For Congress". Marin Journal (22 (29)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 21 September 1882. p. 2. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  10. ^ "Republican Convention". Mariposa Gazette (8). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 4 August 1888. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Plea Being Made that Raker is Not Eligible". Red Bluff News (45). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 30 September 1910. p. 8. Retrieved September 14, 2017. Hon. J. J. De Haven was a judge of the superior court of Humboldt county at the time he was elected to congress from this district 
  12. ^ Bakken, Gordon Morris; Farrington, Brenda (2001). Law in the West. Taylor & Francis. p. 94. ISBN 0815334613. Retrieved July 22, 2017. 
  13. ^ "State Republicans". Sacramento Daily Union (59 (137)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 1 August 1888. p. 2. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  14. ^ "Men About Town". San Francisco Call (67 (179)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 26 November 1890. p. 1. Retrieved September 13, 2017. 
  15. ^ "De Haven Lost". San Francisco Call (76 (22)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 22 June 1894. p. 1. Retrieved September 13, 2017. 
  16. ^ "The Non Partisans". San Francisco Call (76 (157)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 4 November 1894. p. 4. Retrieved September 14, 2017. We have seen renomination refused to an eminent Jurist of lofty character, John J. De Haven, because be was not acceptable to the Republican Boss Burns. 
  17. ^ "De Haven Nomination as District Judge Assured". Evening Sentinel (1 (308)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 26 May 1897. p. 1. Retrieved September 13, 2017. 
  18. ^ "Installation of Judge De Haven". San Francisco Call (82 (18)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 18 June 1897. p. 7. Retrieved September 13, 2017. 
  19. ^ "Excluded, Segregated and Forgotten: A Historical View of the Discrimination of Chinese Americans in Public Schools". Asian Am. L.J. 5 (1): 181. 1998. Retrieved July 24, 2017. 
  20. ^ "Judge Dooling to Don Stiff Collar". San Francisco Call (114 (71)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 10 August 1913. p. 14. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  21. ^ "Judge De Haven Stricken". Press Democrat (21). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 25 January 1913. p. 1. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  22. ^ "Judge De Haven Passes on at Yountville Homoe". Sausalito News (5). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 1 February 1913. p. 6. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  23. ^ "Judge John De Haven, Who Died in Napa County". San Francisco Call. California Digital Newspaper Collection. 27 January 1913. p. 3. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  24. ^ "The Death of Judge De Haven". Marin Journal (53 (5)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 30 January 1913. p. 7. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 
  25. ^ "De Haven Still Alive". San Francisco Call (113 (57)). California Digital Newspaper Collection. 26 January 1913. p. 19. Retrieved September 14, 2017. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas Larkin Thompson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 1st congressional district

1889–1890
Succeeded by
Thomas J. Geary
Legal offices
Preceded by
William W. Morrow
Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California
1897–1913
Succeeded by
Maurice Timothy Dooling
Legal offices
Preceded by
Charles N. Fox
Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court
1890–1895
Succeeded by
Frederick W. Henshaw