John Jameson (politician)

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John Jameson (Missouri Congressman)

John Jameson (March 6, 1802 – January 24, 1857) was an American farmer, lawyer, and politician from Fulton, Missouri. He represented Missouri in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Jameson was born in Mount Sterling, Kentucky in Montgomery County, Kentucky on March 6, 1802. He attended the common schools, moved to Callaway County, Missouri in 1825, studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1826 and commenced practice in Fulton, Missouri.

He served as a captain in the militia during the Black Hawk War. He held several local offices, including: member of the Missouri House of Representatives from 1830 to 1836; and Speaker of the House from 1834 to 1836.

Jameson was elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth Congress, filling the vacancy caused by the death of Albert G. Harrison, and serving from December 12, 1839 to March 3, 1841. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1840.

In 1842 Jameson was again elected to the U.S. House, serving the Twenty-eighth Congress (March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1845). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1844.

Jameson was elected to the Thirtieth Congress (March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1848.

In his later years Jameson was a farmer, and was ordained as a minister in the Christian Church.

As a lawyer Jameson led the defense of the slave woman Celia in what became an influential trial in the history of slavery.[1] Jameson's great uncle was Col. John Jameson and he was a second cousin (thrice removed) to George Washington.

Jameson died in Fulton, Missouri on January 24, 1857, and was interred in the Jameson family cemetery near Fulton.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Melton A. McLaurin, Celia, A Slave, Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1991

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Albert Galliton Harrison
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's at-large congressional district

1839–1841
Succeeded by
John C. Edwards
Preceded by
John C. Edwards
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's at-large congressional district

1843–1845
Succeeded by
Sterling Price
Preceded by
None (New district)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 2nd congressional district

1847–1849
Succeeded by
William Van Ness Bay