John Macnab

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John Macnab
Author John Buchan
Country Scotland
Language English
Series Edward Leithen
Genre Novel
Publication date
1925
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages 208 pp
ISBN 1-85326-296-X (reissue)
Preceded by The Power House
Followed by The Dancing Floor

John Macnab is a novel by John Buchan, published in 1925.[1][2]

Plot summary[edit]

Three successful but bored friends in their mid-forties decide to turn to poaching. They are Sir Edward Leithen, lawyer, Conservative Member of Parliament (MP), and ex-Attorney General; John Palliser-Yeates, banker and sportsman; and Charles, Earl of Lamancha, former adventurer and present Conservative Cabinet Minister. Under the collective name of 'John Macnab', they set up in the Highland home of Sir Archie Roylance, a disabled war hero who wishes to be a Conservative MP.

They issue a challenge to three of Roylance's neighbours: first the Radens, who are an old-established family, about to die out; next, the Bandicotts: an American archaeologist and his son, who are renting a grand estate for the summer; and lastly the Claybodys, vulgar, bekilted nouveaux riches. These neighbours are forewarned that 'John Macnab' will poach a salmon or a stag from their land and return it to them undetected. The outcome is that the men's boredom is dispelled with the assistance of helpers (including a homeless waif, 'Fish Benjie' and an athletic journalist, Crossby), and Archie Roylance marries Janet Raden, daughter of the grandee.

Influence[edit]

TV adaptation[edit]

John Prebble adapted the book for a three-part BBC television production in 1976, directed by Donald McWhinnie.[3]

Cast :

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Freebooters". The West Australian. Perth. 3 October 1925. p. 15. Retrieved 13 September 2015 – via National Library of Australia. 
  2. ^ ""JOHN MACNAB."". The Sunday Times. Perth. 22 November 1925. p. 12 Section: Second Section. Retrieved 13 September 2015 – via National Library of Australia. 
  3. ^ Banks-Smith, Nancy (15 Apr 1976). "John Macnab". The Guardian. London (UK). p. 10. 

External links[edit]