John McMartin (Canadian politician)

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[1]John McMartin (September 2, 1858 – April 12, 1918) was a businessman, mining executive, and political figure in Ontario, Canada. He represented Glengarry and Stormont in the Canadian House of Commons, from 1917 until his death in 1918, as a Unionist Party member.[2]

Early life[edit]

McMartin was born at Apple Hill, then part of Charlottenburgh Township, Ontario, and now part of North Glengarry, Ontario, to Allan McMartin and Mary Catherine McDougald (later styled McDonald)(1869 - 1941), daughter of John Angus McDougald (1838-1923), who was Local Registrar of the High Court of Justice, and a son of Major Angus McDougald, a member of the 4th Battalion Glengarry militia on active service during the Rebellions of 1837–1838, and his wife, Annie Chisholm (1843-1917), whose parents were Ranald Chisholm and Catherine McPhee.[3][4][5]He was educated in Glengarry area public schools.[6]

Early in life, to differentiate him from a brother also named John, McMartin was called "Red John" and "Red Jack", a reflection of his reddish hair color.[7]

Career[edit]

In 1883, prior to entering politics, McMartin was superintendent of construction on the Canadian Pacific Railway, where, in 1903, he had allowed contractor Alfred "Fred" La Rose, a blacksmith to prospect, along with his railroad work, on the condition that he split any find 50-50 with McMartin, who, in turn, would partner with his brother, Duncan (1868 - 1914).

La Rose, a blacksmith, while working on construction of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway (T&NO) at Mile 103 from North Bay, Ontario– where he had built a small cabin –there chanced upon Erythrite, often an indication of associated cobalt and native silver. (A fanciful story later developed that La Rose discovered the vein when he threw a hammer at a pesky fox.)[8] La Rose sold his share to brothers Noah Timmins and Henry Timmins, effectively creating a de facto partnership between the McMartin and Timmins brothers.[9]

In 1909, the foursome purchased another claim from Benjamin Hollinger,[10] incorporating Hollinger Mines in 1910, with the addition of a fifth partner, Timmins' ally, Mattawa, Ontario lawyer David Dunlop, for whom the David Dunlap Observatory is named, after he had shown great value to the enterprise by successfully defended their claim in court.[11]

In 1903, McMartin established himself in Cornwall, Ontario,[11] where he was president of the Labrador Pulp and Paper Company and of the Motherlode Sheep Creek Mining Company, and vice-president of Hollinger Consolidated Mines. In 1917, McMartin moved to Canada's financial center, Montréal in 1917, where he died in office at the age of 59.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dictionary of Glengarry Biography by Royce MacGillivray. 2010, ISBN 9780968071120, p. 532
  2. ^ John McMartin (Canadian politician) – Parliament of Canada biography
  3. ^ Cornwall, Stormont, Ontario Marriage Records. Retrieved November 17, 2017.
  4. ^ City of Timmins Timmins, Ontario Canada, "Founding Fathers". Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  5. ^ Harkness, John Graham (1946). Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry : a history, 1784-1945. p. 312. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2009-09-02. 
  6. ^ a b Johnson, J.K. (1968). The Canadian Directory of Parliament 1867-1967. Public Archives of Canada. 
  7. ^ Find A Grave, "John 'Red Jack' McMartin". Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  8. ^ Barnes, Michael (1986). Fortunes in the Ground. Erin, Ontario: The Boston Mills Press. p. 16. ISBN 091978352X. 
  9. ^ Barnes, Michael (1986). Fortunes in the Ground. Erin, Ontario: The Boston Mills Press. p. 16. ISBN 091978352X. 
  10. ^ Sheppard, George “HOLLINGER, BENJAMIN,” Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. 14, University of Toronto/Université Laval, 2003–, accessed November 12, 2017.
  11. ^ a b Harkness, John Graham (1946). Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry : a history, 1784-1945. p. 312. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2009-09-02. 

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