John Niparko

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John K. Niparko (1955 – April 25, 2016) was an American surgeon-scientist who specialized in cochlear implants,[1] and edited, and wrote several chapters of, the book Cochlear Implants: Principles & Practices. He was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan and attended the University of Michigan for his bachelor’s and medical degrees. He completed his residency in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery and a fellowship in neurotology at Michigan and served as a faculty member before moving on to Johns Hopkins University.[1][2]

At the time of his death at age 61, Niparko was the chair of the USC Keck School of Medicine's Caruso Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.[3] Before he moved to USC in 2013, he was the George T. Nager Professor and director of the Division of Otology, Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery at Johns Hopkins University.[3]

Niparko was recognized as a leading authority on cochlear implants, and notably operated on former Miss America Heather Whitestone in 2002.[4]

Niparko conducted research demonstrating that cochlear implants were highly cost effective in children and adults.[5] He led efforts to establish a new national organization to focus on the underutilization of cochlear implants in the United States. This led to the founding of the American Cochlear Implant Alliance in 2011 with a mission to focus on access to cochlear implants.

The John Niparko Lecture at the annual Cochlear Implant Symposium was established by the American Cochlear Implant Alliance in his honor.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Passings: Renowned ENT Surgeon-Scientist John Niparko, MD". The Hearing Review. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  2. ^ Beck, Douglas (27 January 2003). "Interview with John Niparko MD". AudiologyOnline. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Reeve, Sara. "In memoriam: John Niparko, 61". USC News. Retrieved 17 February 2017. 
  4. ^ "After 29 Silent Years, Ex-Miss America Hears". ABC News. 30 September 2002. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Cost-utility of the cochlear implant in children". JAMA Network. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  6. ^ "John Niparko Memorial Lecture". American Cochlear Implant Alliance. Retrieved 9 June 2017.