John Price Wetherill Medal

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The John Price Wetherill Medal was an award of the Franklin Institute. It was established with a bequest given by the family of John Price Wetherill (1844–1906) on April 3, 1917. On June 10, 1925, the Board of Managers voted to create a silver medal, to be awarded for "discovery or invention in the physical sciences" or "new and important combinations of principles or methods already known". The legend on the first medal read: "for discovery, invention, or development in the physical sciences".[1] The John Price Wetherill Medal was last awarded in 1997.[2] As of 1998 all of the endowed medals previously awarded by the Franklin Institute were reorganized as the Benjamin Franklin Medals.[3]

Recipients[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Year Book - Franklin Institute. Philadelphia, Pa.: Franklin Institute. 1921. p. 57. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "Federico Capasso". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Awards Program History". Franklin Institute. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  4. ^ Year Book - Franklin Institute. Philadelphia, Pa.: Franklin Institute. 1919. p. 92. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  5. ^ Firth, Margaret A., ed. (1956). Handbook of scientific and technical awards in the United States and Canada, 1900-1952. New York: Special Libraries Association. p. 292. 
  6. ^ Year Book - Franklin Institute. Philadelphia, Pa.: Franklin Institute. 1928. p. 78. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  7. ^ "The Case Files: William Jennings, Unlike Any Other". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  8. ^ "Thomas Tarvin Gray". Find A Grave. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  9. ^ "Edwin G. Steele / Death Claims Manufacturer, Award Winner". The Dallas Morning News. September 4, 1938. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  10. ^ Day, Lance; McNeil, Ian (1998). Biographical dictionary of the history of technology (1st ed.). London: Routledge. pp. 1106–1107. ISBN 978-0415193993. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  11. ^ "Boon for the Blind". Urbana Daily Courier. 13 June 1935. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  12. ^ "Inventor wins medal" (PDF). The Philadelphia Inquirer. May 3, 1935. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  13. ^ "R. H. Leach, 84, Southport, Dies". The Bridgeport Post. January 27, 1963. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  14. ^ "FAWICK, THOMAS L". The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  15. ^ "Personals" (PDF). Engineering and Science. 17 (3): 40. 1953. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  16. ^ "William D. Buckingham Papers". Kelvin Smith Library. Case Western Reserve University. 
  17. ^ Day, Lance; McNeil, Ian (1998). "Boot, Henry Albert Howard". Biographical dictionary of the history of technology (1st ed.). London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0415193993. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  18. ^ "Wetherill Medals". Chem. Eng. News. 39 (32): 74–79, 91. August 7, 1961. doi:10.1021/cen-v039n032.p074. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  19. ^ "The Fall of Parity". National Institute of Standards and Technology. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  20. ^ "Obituary Notice Pioneer in Ocean Technology: Fred N. Spiess". Scripps Institution of Oceanography. UC San Diego. Retrieved September 11, 2006. 
  21. ^ "Britton Chance, 1913-2010". The Pauling Blog. Retrieved 6 June 2017. 
  22. ^ Jones, Stacy V. (June 20, 1964). "Explosives used to join metals". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  23. ^ Langenberg, Donald (1972). "One Researcher's Personal Account". Adventures in Physics (PDF). Princeton, NJ: World Science Communications. 
  24. ^ Stern, F. (April 4, 1983). "Citation Classic - PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACE INVERSION-LAYERS IN THE ELECTRIC QUANTUM LIMIT CC/PHYS CHEM EARTH" (PDF). Citation Classic Commentaries. 14: 22. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  25. ^ "Secondary electron spectroscopy pinpoints surface impurities". Chem. Eng. News. 45 (35): 14. August 21, 1967. doi:10.1021/cen-v045n035.p014a. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  26. ^ "Franklin Institute Honors Eight Physicists". Physics Today. 38 (7): 84. 1985. doi:10.1063/1.2814644. 
  27. ^ Benson, William E.; Sclar, Charles B. (1995). "Memorial of Alvin Van Valkenburg, Jr. 1913-1991" (PDF). American Mineralogist. 80: 191–193. Retrieved 5 June 2015.