John Punnett Peters

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John Punnett Peters (1852-1921) was an American Episcopal clergyman and Orientalist, born in New York City. He graduated from Hopkins School in 1868[1] and then from Yale in 1873. He studied at Berlin and at Leipzig. He was professor of Old Testament languages and literature at the Protestant Episcopal Divinity School in Philadelphia (1884 -91) and professor of Hebrew at the University of Pennsylvania (1885-93) and from 1888 to 1895 conducted excavations at Nippur with John Henry Haynes and Hermann Volrath Hilprecht. He became rector of St. Michael's Church, New York, in 1893, and from 1904 to 1910 he was also canon residentiary of the cathedral of St. John the Divine.

Architect Frazier Forman Peters was his son. His other son, also named John Punnett Peters (Dec. 4, 1887 - Dec. 29, 1955), initially described the Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome.

Peters wrote:

  • Nippur, or Explorations and Adventures on the Euphrates (two volumes, 1897)
  • The Old Testament and the New Scholarship (1901)
  • Early Hebrew Story: Its Historical Background (1904)
  • With Hermann Thiersch, Painted tombs in the necropolis of Marissa (Marêshah) (1905)
  • Annals of St. Michael's, New York, for One Hundred Years, 1807-1907 (1907)
  • Modern Christianity (1909)
  • Jesus Christ and the Old Commandments (1913)
  • The Religion of the Hebrews (1914)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Catalog of Trustees, Rectors, Instructors, and Alumni of Hopkins Grammar School. New Haven, CT: Dorman. 1902. p. 80. 


Wikisource-logo.svg This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainGilman, D. C.; Thurston, H. T.; Colby, F. M., eds. (1905). "article name needed". New International Encyclopedia (1st ed.). New York: Dodd, Mead.