John Rhodes (mathematician)

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John Rhodes
John Rhodes.jpg
Born July 16, 1937
Columbus, OH, U.S.
Nationality American
Fields Mathematics
Institutions University of California, Berkeley
Alma mater Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Doctoral advisor Warren Ambrose
Doctoral students 26
Known for Krohn–Rhodes theorem
Notable awards National Science Foundation Post-Doc Fellow (1962)

John Lewis Rhodes is a mathematician known for work in the theory of semigroups, finite state automata, and algebraic approaches to differential equations.[1][2] He was born in Columbus, Ohio, on July 16, 1937, but grew up in Wooster, Ohio, where he founded the Wooster Rocket Society as a teenager. In the fall of 1955, Rhodes entered Massachusetts Institute of Technology intending to major in physics, but he soon switched to mathematics, earning his B.S. in 1960 and his Ph.D. in 1962. His Ph.D. thesis, co-written with a graduate student from Harvard, Kenneth Krohn, became known as the Prime Decomposition Theorem, or more simply Krohn–Rhodes theory. After a year on an NSF fellowship in Paris, France, he became a member of the Faculty of Mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he spent his entire teaching career.

In the late 1960s Rhodes wrote The Wild Book, which quickly became an underground classic, but remained in typescript until its revision and editing by Chrystopher L. Nehaniv in 2009.[3] The following year Springer Monographs in Mathematics published his and Benjamin Steinberg's magnum opus, The q-theory of Finite Semigroups, a compendium of the history of the field, but more importantly the fruit of eight years' development of finite semigroup theory.[4]

In recent years Rhodes has expanded his research, bringing the insights of semigroups into matroid theory. In 2015 he published, with Pedro V. Silva, the results of his current work in another monograph with Springer: Boolean Representations of Simplicial Complexes and Matroids.[5]

See also[edit]

Publications[edit]

  • John Rhodes and Benjamin Steinberg (2008-12-17). The q-theory of finite semigroups. Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-0-387-09780-0.
  • "The Wild Book", published as Applications of Automata Theory and Algebra via the Mathematical Theory of Complexity to Biology, Physics, Psychology, Philosophy, and Games. John Rhodes. Chrystopher L. Nehaniv (Ed.). Foreword by Morris W. Hirsch. (2009, World Scientific Books.) ISBN 978-981-283-696-0
  • John Rhodes and Pedro V. Silva (2015-04). Boolean Representations of Simplicial Complexes and Matroids. Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-3-319-15114-4

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] University of California, Berkeley 2011. Retrieved 14 September 2011.
  2. ^ John Rhodes at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  3. ^ Applications of Automata Theory and Algebra via the Mathematical Theory of Complexity to Biology, Physics, Psychology, Philosophy, and Games. John Rhodes. Chrystopher L. Nehaniv (Ed.). Foreword by Morris W. Hirsch. (2009, World Scientific Books.) ISBN 978-981-283-696-0 (Print) ISBN 978-981-283-697-7 (Online)
  4. ^ John Rhodes and Benjamin Steinberg (2008-12-17). The q-theory of finite semigroups. Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-0-387-09780-0 (Print) ISBN 978-0-387-09781-7 (Online)
  5. ^ John Rhodes and Pedro V. Silva (2015-04). Boolean Representations of Simplicial Complexes and Matroids. Springer Verlag. ISBN 978-3-319-15114-4

External links[edit]