John Serry Sr.

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John Serry
John Serry in 1967
Born(1915-01-29)January 29, 1915
Brooklyn, United States
DiedSeptember 14, 2003(2003-09-14) (aged 88)
Long Island, United States
Occupation(s)Accordionist, Organist, Educator, Composer
Years active1930-2002

John Serry Sr. (born John Serrapica; January 29, 1915 – September 14, 2003) was an American concert accordionist, arranger, composer, organist, and educator. He performed on the CBS Radio and Television networks and contributed to Voice of America's cultural diplomacy initiatives during the Golden Age of Radio. He also concertized on the accordion as a member of several orchestras and jazz ensembles for nearly forty years between the 1930s and 1960s.[1][2]

External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. performing Agustin Lara's bolero Granada with the lyric tenor Nestor Mesta Chayres and the Alfredo Antonini Orchestra in 1946 Here

Biography[edit]

Serry's career spanned over seven decades. As a proponent of Latin American music and the free-bass accordion, he performed as the piano accordionist on the radio music program Viva América, which was broadcast live to South America under the United States Department of State's Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs' cultural diplomacy initiative for Voice of America during World War II.[3][4][5][6][7][8] Broadcasts of this show have been cited as helping to introduce Latin American music and the Mexican bolero to large audiences in the United States in the 1940s.[9][10]

Serry performed with big bands, symphony orchestras, radio and television orchestras, and Broadway orchestras at the Radio City Music Hall,[11] the Rainbow Room at Rockefeller Center (1935);[12] the Starlight Roof at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel (1936–1937);[13][14] the Palmer House in Chicago (1938);[15] the Stevens Hotel in Chicago (1938);[16] the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles (1938);[15] Carnegie Hall with Alfredo Antonini conducting (1946);[17] the Plaza Hotel (1940s); The Town Hall (1941–1942);[18][19][20] the Waldorf Astoria Hotel's Wedgewood Room (1948),[21] The Rajah Theatre (1953),[22] the Ed Sullivan Theater (1959) for CBS television; the Empire Theater (New York) (1953);[23] and such New York cafe society nightspots as: El Morocco, El Chico and The Riviera in the 1930s. During the course of these performances he appeared under the musical direction of several noted conductors including: Alfredo Antonini, Mischa Borr, Percy Faith, Shep Fields, Mitch Miller[24] and Andre Kostelanetz.[25][26][27]

Carnegie Hall

Serry was born John Serrapica in Brooklyn, New York to Pasquale Serrapica and Anna Balestrieri,[2] the fourth-born of thirteen siblings.[28][29][30][31] His Italian father immigrated to America from Gragnano, Italy after passing through Ellis Island in 1904 and 1914.[32][33] The family owned a grocery store after initially moving to Navy Street in 1905,[34] and subsequently taking up residence on 18th Avvenue in the Bensonhurst section.[35] His formal musical education included studies with the accordionist Joseph Rossi from 1926 to 1929 at the Pietro Deiro School in New York. At the age of fifeteen he performed live on the Italian radio station WCDA.[36] By the age of nineteen, Serrapica was already enrolled as a member of the American Federation of Musicians in 1934.[37] In addition, he undertook studies in piano and harmony with Albert Rizzi from 1929 to 1932 and in harmony and counterpoint with Gene Von Hallberg for two years.[38] Von Hallberg served as a cofounder of the American Accordionists Association in 1938.[39] Hallberg later appeared in the Magnante Quartet before an audience of three thousand concertgoers at Carnegie Hall in 1939 [40][41] A lifelong friendship with the accordionist Louis Del Monte was established as a result of these studies. Del Monte awakened Serry's interest in Latin American music.[38] Advanced studies in harmony and orchestration were completed under the instruction of the composer Robert Strassburg in the 1940s.

Career[edit]

The 1930s: The big band era[edit]

Rainbow Room in Rockefeller Center, New York City

The period from 1938 to 1960 has been described as a unique period of prestige for the accordion in the United States when it attained more widespread acceptance by the public as a "serious instrument" on the concert hall stage.[42][43] At the age of sixteen, Serrapica had already performed as a soloist on the AM radio station WOV in New York City during several live broadcasts in 1931.[44][45][46] With the help of Del Monte, in the 1930s Serry continued his professional career by making appearances with the Ralph Gomez Tango Orchestra at The Rainbow Room at the RCA Building in Rockefeller Center,[12] leading to an extended engagement there in 1935.[12] He also played with the Hugo Mariani Tango Orchestra at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel,[38] with Alfred Brito, a Cuban orchestra leader in New York (1936), and Misha Borr, conductor of the Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra.[38] He appeared as a soloist for society functions at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel's Waldorf Towers and at its Starlight Roof with the Lester Lanin Orchestra. In addition, he performed regularly at clubs such as El Morocco, the Rainbow Room, El Chico, and the Riviera in New York City.[12]

The "golden age of the accordion" continued to evolve in America from 1910 to 1960 and some piano accordionists suddenly enjoyed acceptance as performers within the best known dance bands, jazz ensembles and big band ensembles such as the Paul Whiteman orchestra.[47][48] As the decade came to a close, Serry acquired a position with the jazz ensemble Shep Fields and His Rippling Rhythm during a nationwide tour which included live radio broadcasts from the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, and the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California, over the NBC network (1937–1938).[15][49] These big band remote broadcasts used Zenith's Radiogran technology. In 1937, he also recorded the distinctive Shep Fields' theme song with the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra for Eli Oberstein on RCA Victor's Bluebird label (Victor, BS-017494, 1937).[50] His performances as a member of the orchestra are also documented in the film The Big Broadcast of 1938 ("This Little Ripple Had Rhythm" and "Thanks for the Memory"), which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1939. While touring with Shep Fields, he also recorded several popular songs of the time for Bluebird Records, including "With a Smile and a Song", "Whistle While You Work", and "Now It Can Be Told".[51][52]

At the young age of only 23 in 1938, Serry was already collaborating on stage with several noted accordionists of the early 20th century including: Andy Arcari, Anthony Mecca, Domenic Mecca, Pietro Deiro and Joe Biviano.[53][54] The six accordionists joined forces at the north ballroom of the legendary Stevens Hotel in Chicago for an "Accordion Jamfest" before an audience of over 1000 concertgoers in September 1938.[55] The concert occurred soon after Andy Arcari's noted accordion recital at Philadelphia's Academy of Music in May 1938, where critics praise him for his brilliance.[56] In a few short months both Biviano and the Mecca brothers would appear with Charles Magnante, Gene Von Hallberg and Abe Goldman to introduce the accordion in recital for the first time to an audience of classical music concertgoers in Carnegie Hall (April, 1939).[57][58][59]

The 1940s: The golden age of radio[edit]

Serry married Julia Trafficante in the 1940s and moved to Nassau County, New York on Long Island to raise a family of four children which included John Serry Jr.[60] The original family name of Serrapica was shortened by John to Serry.[61] He simultaneously undertook private studies with: Joscha Zade in piano (1945–1946); Arthur Guttow, an organist at the Radio City Music Hall (1946);[62] and Robert Strassburg in Orchestration and Advanced Harmony (1948–1950). He specialized in the works of Gershwin, Debussy, and Ravel.[63]

Town Hall in New York City

During the 1930s and 1940s many accordionists emerged as performers on American radio, the new mass entertainment medium of the time.[64] Building upon his concert experiences of the 1930s, Serry entered the golden age of radio performing on the CBS radio network and assisted several concert artists in New York City including the French diseuse Marianne Oswald (aka Marianne Lorraine) in her English speaking debut of "One Woman Theatre" performing the poem Mr. Lincoln and His Gloves (by Carl Sandburg), Never Before (by Archibald MacLeish) and poems by Jean Cocteau and Jacques Prevert at Town Hall (1942).[65][19][66] The concert was hosted by the Free World Association and presented with the patronage of Eleanor Roosevelt .[67][68] This performance was praised in The Players Magazine - National Journal of Educational Dramatics as a "fresh experience and intriguing in its uniqueness."[69] The New York Times described it as being skillfully presented.[70][66] For ten years Serry performed as an original member of Alfredo Antonini's CBS Pan American Orchestra (1940–1949)[71][72][73][74] on the Viva América program for the Department of State's Office of Inter-American Affairs (OCIAA) in support of its cultural diplomacy initiatives.[75] [76][38][73][77][78][79] He also worked with Antonini, Nestor Mesta Chayres and members of the New York Philharmonic in the Night of the Americas Concert gala at Carnegie Hall in 1946.[17][80]

During this period, several international concert musicians also appeared on Viva America or recorded music with Antonini's Viva America Orchestra including:[81] Terig Tucci (1942)[82][83][84][85][86] Juan Arvizu (1940s);[87] Nestor Mesta Chayres (1940s);[88] Eva Garza (1940s);[89][10] Elsa Miranda (1940s),[90][91][92] Los Panchos Trio (1946),[93][94][95] and Manuolita Arriola (1946)[96] Under the supervision of Edmund Chester, these performances were beamed over CBS' Network of the Americas ("La Cadena de las Americas") across the Latin America continent to over twenty countries[97][98] and rebroadcast by the United States Office of War Information and the United States Armed Forces Radio Service.[99][100][97] Performances by members of Antonini's CBS Pan American Orchestra on Viva America have been credited with helping to introduce Latin American music and the Mexican bolero to large audiences in the United States in the 1940s.[9][10]

External image
image icon Photograph of John Serry on the CBS radio network circa 1940s in the John J. Serry Sr. Collection Archive.
Here on Esm.rochester.edu

In addition, Serry also recorded examples of music unrelated to the bolero. During the 1940s he collaborated with the Mischa Borr Orchestra and the vocalist Sidor Belarsky to record several Russian and Ukrainian folk songs for Victor records including: "Dark Night" (Victor 26–5037, 1946) by Nikita Bogoslovsky,[101] "Hobo Song" (aka "Mother") (Victor 26–5036, 1946) by Valery Zhelobinsky,[102] "By the Cradle" (Victor 26–5035, 1946),[103] "Katusha" (Victor 26–5035, 1946) by Hy Zaret[104][105] In 1946 he also made a guest appearance as the "outstanding accordionist of the year" on Gordon Macrae's Skyline Roof broadcast on the WABC-CBS network and as a guest on the Danny O'Neil Show.[106][107] By 1948, he also appeared in concert with Mischa Borr's Orchestra at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel's Wedgewood Room.[21]

Serry recorded his work "Leone Jump" as a member of the Biviano Accordion & Rhythm Sextette with Tony Mottola on guitar and Angelo Delleria on accordion for Sonora Records in 1945.[108][109][110][111] The album includes performances of "Little Brown Jug", "Golden Wedding", "Swing Low Sweet Chariot", "That's a Plenty", and "The Jazz Me Blues".[112][109] His composition "Fantasy in F" was completed during this decade in 1946.[113] The critic Henry Doktorski has described it as a "novelty piece" and likened it to Zez Confrey's composition "Dizzy Fingers".[114] In 1946 he also appeared in the "Accordion World" concert at Manhattan Center with the accordionists Angello Dellairia and Joeseph Biviano.[115] Later in 1949, the accordionist Joe Biviano collaborated with the RCA Victor Accordion Orchestra to record Serry's composition "Manhattan Hop" for RCA Victor.[116][117] He also recorded several popular songs for Victor Records as a member of the noted Charles Magnante Accordion Band in 1941 including: "Clarinete Polka", '"Halli-Hallo- Halli", "Le Secret" and "Swing Me A Polka".[118] Both Magnante and Biviano were cofounders of the American Accordionists' Association several years earlier in 1938.[119][120]

By the end of the 1930s an "accordion craze" had swept the nation.[121] Numerous accordion studios soon emerged within the major ethnic population centers of the East coast, as well as within the rural South and West with an estimated enrollment of over 35,000 students in 1938.[122][123] As an educator, Serry founded and operated a music studio in Jamaica, Queens in New York City[124] and Long Island, New York.[125] Between 1945 and the late 1980s he provided instruction on accordion, piano, and organ.[82][126] His pupils included Anthony Ettore, president of the American Accordionist's Association,[127] and Robert Davine, an accordionist and educator at the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver[128] as well as his son John Serry Jr.[129][130] During the 1950s one of his students, Roy Appey, emerged as the first prize winner in a performance competition hosted by the American Accordionists' Association.[131] In addition, Serry was invited to contribute to the annual series of Master Accordion Classes and seminars sponsored by the American Accordionists Association in New York City in August 2000.[132] He also published several method books for his elementary, intermediate, and advanced grade students between 1945 and 1955.[38][133][134] In addition, he took note of the limitations imposed by the Stradella bass system during performances of classical music. In an effort to circumvent these limitations, he designed and developed a working model of a free-bass system for the accordion during this decade. It incorporated dual keyboards for the soloist's left hand while incorporating two sets of reeds which were tuned in octaves. This gave the soloist access to a range of tones which exceeded three and one-half octaves.[135][43]

The 1950s: Broadway and television[edit]

Shubert Theatre in New York City
Shubert Theatre NYC

During the early days of network television in the 1950s, Serry performed at CBS as a staff member of the original CBS Orchestra (1949–1960)[63] and an accompanist on several live network television programs including The Jackie Gleason Show in 1953,[63] The Frank Sinatra Show in the 1950s,[63] and on the prime time drama I Remember Mama in 1953 starring Peggy Wood.[136][63] Following introductions by his young son Robert, he was also featured as a soloist on the talent show Live Like A Millionaire on the NBC radio network in 1951.[137][138]

In 1951 he also arranged his compositions La Culebra and African Bolero for solo flute. He dedicated the scores to his close friend Julius Baker, who subsequently performed them on a demo recording.[139][140][141][142][143] In the same year, his photograph was featured within an article about the accordion which was published by the journal International Musician - the official publication of the International Federation of Musicians,[144] along with photographs of such noted accordionists as: Louis Del Monte, Pietro Frosini, Anthony Galla-Rini, Charles Magnante, Charles Nunzio, and Art Van Damme.[145] By 1953, he was also photographed by the Bell accordion company as one of several leading accordion artists along with Tony Lavelli and Vince Geraci.[146]

During this time he also performed under the musical direction of Andre Kostelanetz at CBS.[147] As the first accordionist in the Serry Sextette, he recorded his own arrangements of several popular melodies and classical themes for the RCA Thesaurus electrical transcriptions[148] catalog in 1954 [149][150] during Ben Selvin's tenure as A & R Manager for RCA Victor.[151][152] Performances on the radio also continued during this period and included: appearances as a member of the Magnante Accordion Quartet, on The Lucky Strike Hour, Waltz Time, and The American Melody Hour (1940s). He occasionally substituted for the quartet's founder Charles Magnante.[38]

On the Broadway stage he performed under director Harold Clurman in a production of Arthur Laurents play The Time of the Cuckoo with Shirley Booth and Dino Di Luca.[23][153][154] By 1953, he had also arranged music which was edited by Lawrence Welk and utilized in a course of study for the piano accordion by the U. S. School of Music,[155] which was described years later as the oldest home study music school chartered by the Board of Regents in New York State with a total worldwide enrollment of over one million students.[156] The school also utilized his photograph to encourage enrollment in its course of study for the piano accordion.[157] In the same year, he appeared as a featured soloist at an accordion concert hosted at the Rajah Theatre in Reading, Pennsylvania.[22][153] He also completed arrangements of popular songs for Seeburg's jukeboxes featuring three accordions, violins, vibes, guitar, bass, percussion and piano. Included among them were: I Get a Kick Out of You, Mimi, The One I Love, Swingin' Down the Lane, and Tico-Tico.[158]

In 1956 Serry composed, arranged and performed several compositions for Dot Records (#DLP3024)[159] with Al Caiola and Bernie Leighton on his album Squeeze Play [160][161] during Billy Vaughn's tenure as music director at Dot Records.[162][163][164][165][166] The production received a critical review as a new popular album in The Billboard in 1956 and was cited for establishing a beautiful soothing mood.[167] The album was also critically reviewed in Cash Box magazine later that year.[168] It features his original composition Garden In Monaco which is adapted from the theme of an ancient Italian serenade.[169][170] Serry was applauded for establishing a wide variety of musical moods with grace, while simultaneously emphasizing a relaxed performance style.[168] In 1958 several songs from the album were released once again in France by Versailles records (# 90 M 178) as Chicago Musette - John Serry et son Accordéon.[171][172][173] Dot Records also released several songs from the album in Japan as part of a compilation recording including the John Serry Orchestra and the Billy Vaughn Orchestra (Ballroom in Dreamland, Dot #5006).[174][175] These activities led to Serry's nomination to the "Who Is Who In Music International" in 1958.[63] His advanced grade composition for accordion, American Rhapsody was completed and published during 1955.[176]

The 1960s: Liturgical organ music[edit]

In 1960, Serry emerged as a performer in one of the first stereo recordings of an accordion orchestra on a major label for Coral Records with such noted instrumentalists as: Joe Biviano, Carmen Carrozza, Angelo Di Pippo and Eugene Ettore.[177][178][179][180] The ensemble of sixteen accordionists utilized modified piano accordions to recreate the orchestral sounds of several instruments while performing classical works by: Rimsky-Korsakov, Karl Maria von Weber, Nicolo Paganini and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.[181][182][183] The recording was cited in Billboard Magazine for its high level of musicality.[184]

Several years later, Serry completed his Concerto For Free Bass Accordion in 1966 and subsequently transcribed it for piano in 2002.[185][186][187] As the decade of the 1960s unfolded, however, the general public's interest in the accordion began to diminish in the United States while the popularity of rock music continued to grow.[43][188][189] The ensuing revolution in popular music induced many young people to view the accordion as a "square relic" from their parents' generation which should be replaced by the electric guitar, electric piano and electronic organ.[190][191] As a result, many established accordion studios either diversified or closed down entirely.[192][188]

C.W. Post College, Brookville, Long Island. LOC gsc.5a29157

With this in mind, Serry devoted the remaining thirty-five years of his professional career to the performance of wedding music and liturgical music of the Catholic and Jewish faiths as a freelance organist at the Interfaith Chapel of Long Island University C W Post Campus in Brookville, N.Y. (1968-2002).[193][194][195][196][197] As more rabbis sought to unite couples of different faiths without first requiring conversions in the 1960s and 1970s,[198] he collaborated with several clergymen of both the Jewish and Catholic religious traditions including: Rabbi Nathaniel Schwartz[197] and the Rev. John Heinlein[199][200][201]

During this period, he also transcribed his composition Processional March (1951) from piano for use on the organ in 1968.[202] In the years which followed, he composed several additional liturgical works for the choir of Notre Dame Parish on Long Island including: A Savior Is Born (1991, organ and solo voice), The Lord's Prayer (1992, organ and chorus) and Lamb of God (1994, for choir, flute and brass).[203]

Serry died after a brief illness on Long Island, New York in 2003, age 88.[204]

Performance style[edit]

Several of John Serry's early live performances and recordings were reviewed by critics in such noted magazines as The Billboard, Cash Box and The Players Magazine - National Journal of Educational Dramatics.[167][168][69] His recording with the Biviano Accordion and Rhythm Sextette for Sonora Records in 1945 (Accordion Capers) was reviewed by Billboard magazine, which noted that the music on the album was strictly for listening as opposed to dancing.[111] While accompanying a dramatic vocalist he was cited for contributing to an intriguing and nuanced performance.[205] His recording of Latin American music with the Alfredo Antonini Viva America Orchestra was described as "as amongst the most attractive" by critics at The New Records in 1946.[206] In addition, his recording of classical compositions by Rimsky-Korsakov, Nicolo Paganini. Carl Maria von Weber and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky as a member of Pietro Deiro's Accordion Orchestra was cited by critics in The Billboard for its high level musicality.[207] His musical arrangements were also cited for using the accordion to convey a variety of musical moods with easy-going grace intended for low-pressure listening.[168] Above all else, he was applauded on his album Squeeze Play for utilizing the accordion to establish a beautiful, relaxed and soothing mood while avoiding a more common type of "show-off" performance.[167][168]

Works[edit]

Compositions and arrangements[edit]

External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. performing his "Leone Jump" with the Joe Biviano Accordion Rhythm Sextette and Tony Mottola in 1945
Here on Archive.org
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. and the Shep Fields Orchestra performing "Whistle While You Work" in 1937
Here on Archive.org

His compositions include:

  • Desert Rumba (for accordion, 1939; publisher Antobal Music, 1951)[208]
  • Glissando (for accordion, publisher Biviano Music, 1942)[209][210]
  • Tarantella (for accordion, 1942; publisher Alpha Music, 1955)[211]
  • Valse (Composer Pytor Ilych Tchaikovsky (Opus 39 No. 8), arr. for accordion, publisher Viccas Music, 1946)[212][213]
  • Fantasy in F (for accordion, publisher Viccas Music, 1946)[214][113][215][216]
  • Invitation to Jive (for three accordions, guitar and bass, 1946)[217]
  • Consolation Waltz (for accordion, publisher O. Pagani & Bro., 1948)[218]
  • Uncle Charlie's Polka (for accordion, publisher O. Pagani Bro., 1948)[219]
  • The Bugle Polka (for accordion, publisher O. Pagani Bro., 1948)[220][221]
  • Leone Jump (for accordion, publisher Pietro Deiro, 1956)[112][222][223][224]
  • La Culebra (for accordion, 1950; arr. accordion & flute; 1950, arr. flute solo 1991; publisher Antobal Music, 1951)[225][226][227][228]
  • African Bolero (for accordion, 1950; arr. accordion & flute; 1950, arr. flute solo 1991; publisher Antobal Music, 1951)[229][230][231][232][233]
  • The Syncopated Accordionist (for accordion, publisher/editor Charles Colin, 1952)[234][235][236]
  • The First Ten Lessons for Accordion (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1952)
  • Accordion Method Books I, II, III, IV (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1953)[133][237]
  • Rhythm-Airs for Accordion (editor John Serry, publisher Charles Colin & Bugs Bower, 1953)[238]
  • La Cinquantaine (m. Gabriel Marie, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1954)[239]
  • Allegro (m. Joseph Hayden, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1954)[240]
  • Top Ten Accordion Solos – Easy to Play (editor: John Serrapica, publisher Alpha Music, 1954)[134][241]
External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. with the tenor Luis G. Roldan and the Alfredo Antonini CBS Pan American Orchestra performing the boleros "Esta Noche Ha Pasasdo" (Sabre Marroquin) and "Tres Palabras" (Osvaldo Farres) in 194?
Here on Archive.org
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. with the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra performing "In The Merry Month of May" (Ed Haley) in 1938
Here on Archive.org
  • Junior Accordion Band Series (arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)[242]
  • Tango Verde (m. Romero, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)
  • Holiday in Rio (m. Terig Tucci, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)
  • En Tu Reja (m. Romero, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)
  • Tango of Love (for accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)[243][244][245]
  • Manolas (m. Escobar, arr. accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)
  • Petite Tango (for accordion quartet, publisher Alpha Music, 1955)[243][244]
  • The Lost Tango for accordion, Words by Edward Steinfeld, 1956)[246]
  • Garden in Monaco (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1956)[243][244][247]
  • Rockin' the Anvil (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1956)[243][244][248]
  • Selected Accordion Solos (arr. accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1956)
  • Cocktails in Spain (for marimba, percussion, guitar, bass and organ, 1957)[249]
  • Spooky Polka (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1957)[250]
  • Reeds in a Rush (for accordion, publisher Alpha Music, 1957)[251]
  • American Rhapsody (for accordion, publisher Rumbasher Alpha Music, 1957)[252]
  • I Get a Kick Out of You (m. Cole Porter, arr. violins, three accordions, vibes, guitar, bass, drums, piano, 195?)[253]
  • Mimi (m. Richard Rodgers, arr. violins, three accordions, vibes, guitar, bass, drums, and piano, 195?)[254]
  • The One I Love (m. Isham Jones, arr. violins, three accordions, vibes, guitar, bass, drums, and piano, 195?)[255]
  • Swingin' Down the Lane (m. Isham Jones, arr. violins, three accordions, vibes, guitar, bass, drums, and piano, 195?)[256]
  • Tico-Tico (m. Zequinha de Abreu, arr. three accordions, guitar, bass and piano, 195?)[257]
  • Processional for Organ (liturgical bridal march for organ, 1968)[258][259]
  • Falling Leaves (for piano, 1976)[260][261]
  • Elegy (for piano or organ, 1984 Rev. 1994)[262]
  • Three Songs of Love (for voice and piano, poems by David Napolin, 1986)[263]
  • A Savior Is Born (Christmas liturgical for organ & voice, 1991)[264][265]
  • Dreams Trilogy (for solo piano, 1991)[266]
  • The Lord's Prayer (liturgical Lord's Prayer for organ and chorus, 1992)[267][268]
  • Lamb of God (liturgical hymn for choir, flute and bass, 1994)[269]
  • Five Children's Pieces For Piano (for piano, 1996)[270]

Advanced compositions[edit]

Serry's compositions in the symphonic jazz and classical music genres include:[271][258][272]

Discography[edit]

External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. with Juan Arvizu and the Alfredo Antonini CBS Tipica Orchestra performing the boleros: "Viva Sevilla", "Mi Sarape", "Que Paso?", "El Bigote de Tomas" and "De Donde?" in 1942
Here on Archive.org
audio icon You may hear selections from the album "Squeeze Play" (Dot Records,1956) in the album "Chicago Musette"
Here on Gallica.bnf.fr
External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry Sr. with Los Panchos Trio and the Alfredo Antonini Viva America Orchestra performing a chilian cueca dance "La Palma" circa 1946 Here on Archive.org
audio icon You may hear John Serry with the Charles Magnante Accordion Band performing "Clarinet Polka" in 1941
Here on Archive.org
  • La Palma and Rosa Negra - Pilotone Records (catalogue # 5067 & # 5069) - as a member of Alfredo Antonini's Viva America Orchestra, Vocalists Los Panchos Trio (194?)[300]List of songs: La Palma (Chilian cueca dance), Rosa Negra (Conga)
  • El Bigote de Tomas and De Donde - Columbia Records (Catalogue # 36666) - as a member of the CBS Tipica Orchestra conducted by Alfredo Antonini with tenor Juan Arvizu (194?)[301] List of musical selections: El Bigote de Tomas - Valie, De Donde - María Grever
  • Mi Sarape and Que Paso? - Columbia Records (catalogue # 36665) - as a member of the CBS Tipica Orchestra conducted by Alfredo Antonini with tenor Juan Arvizu (194?)[301]List of musical selections: Mi Sarape - María Grever, Que Paso? - Cortazar
  • Viva Sevilla! and Noche de Amor - Columbia records (catalogue # 36664) - as a member of the CBS Tipica Orchestra conducted by Alfredo Antonini with tenor Juan Arvizu (194?)[301] Musical selections: Viva Sevilla! - Lavidad/Delmoral, Noche de Amor - Tchaikovsky arr.Arvizu/Antonini
  • Shep Fields and His Rippling Rhythm Orchestra - Bluebird Records - as the accordionist (1938)[51][302][303]List of recordings 1938: A Stranger in Paree (#B-7566), I Wanna Go Back to Bali (B#7566) - Harry Warren/Al Dubin, Cathedral in the Pines (#B-7553) - Charles Kenny/Nick Kenney, Somewhere with Somebody Else (#B-7555), That Feeling Is Gone (#B-7555), Good Evenin', Good Lookin (#B-7553), My Walking Stick (#B-7592), Havin' Myself a Time (#B-7581) - Ralph Rainger/Leo Robin, Fare Thee Well, Annie Laurie (#B-7581), This Time It's Real (#B-7579), If It Rains - Who Cares? (#B-7579), Now It Can Be Told (#B-7592) - Irving Berlin, I've Got a Pocketful of Dreams (#B-7581), In Any Language (#B-7604), Where in the World (#B-7604), Any Little Girl, That's a Nice Little Girl, Is the Right Little Girl for Me (#B-7606) - Thomas J. Gray/Fred Fisher, In the Merry Month of May (#B-7606) - Ed Haley, Don't Let That Moon Get Away (#B-7697) - Johnny Burke (lyricist)/James V. Monaco, An Old Curiosity Shop (#B-10056) - Sam Coslow, Guy Wood, Abner Silver
External audio
audio icon You may hear John Serry and the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Jazz Orchestra playing "With a Smile and a Song" in 1937
Here on Archive.org
audio icon You may hear John Serry and the Shep Fields Orchestra performing the fox trot "There's a New Moon Over the Old Mill" in 1937
Here on ucsb.edu

Filmography[edit]

Invention[edit]

Serry was granted a patent in 1966 by the United States Patent Office for his design of a protective shield for collapsible toothpaste tubes (US Patent #US3269604).[305][306] A patent for the same design was also granted to him by the Canadian Patent Office in 1966 (Serial #998,449 May 14, 1966).[307]

Publications[edit]

  • Serry, John (1935), "The Danzon, The Bolero, The Rumba - The Substitute American Rhythm Emphasis Laid on Going Native", Accordion News[308]
  • Serry, John (1935), "Training: Reading From Piano Scores. Stumbling Cues. Avoid Time Wasters", Accordion News[308]
  • Serry, John (1936), "Chorus", Accordion News[309]
  • Serry, John (November 1937), "Accordions & Orchestras: Past Present & Future", Accordion World.
  • Serry, John (March 1939), "Those Neglected Basses", Accordion World.
  • Serry, John (1947), "What's Wrong With The Accordion", Accordion World.[43]
  • Serry, John (1961), "Jazz And The Student Accordionist", Accordion World.[310]
  • Serrapica, John (1952), The Syncopated Accordionist, Charles Colin.[234]

Archived works[edit]

  • The John J. Serry Sr. Collection at the Eastman School of Music's Sibley Music Library within the Ruth T. Watanabe Special Collections Department contains selected examples of Serry's original compositional scores, arrangements, LP recordings, reel to reel recording tapes, biographical articles and other biographical reference materials which have been donated for archival purposes to benefit both researchers and students. The archive includes a copy of his album Squeeze Play and an audio recording of his arrangements for RCA Thesaurus. Researchers may contact the staff archivist directly for further assistance in obtaining copies of scores or reviewing LP recordings.[278][258][311]
  • The Discography of American Historical Recordings catalog at the University of California at Santa Barbara includes several of the master recordings of Serry's performances with the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Jazz Orchestra in New York City (1937-1938) which are accessible online via audio streaming.[312]

Professional affiliations[edit]

Serry was an active member of the BMI, SESAC, American Federation of Musicians (Local #802) (1933–2003),[313][37] and The American Guild of Organists. For a brief period he served as a charter member of the American Accordionists Association (1938). He pursued professional musical studies with: Joseph Rossi (accordion, 1926–1929); Albert Rizzi (piano and harmony, 1929–1932); Gene Von Hallberg (counterpoint and harmony, 1933–1934)[38] (a founder of the American Accordionists Association); Jascha Zade (piano, 1945–1946);[38] Arthur Guttow (organ, 1946), and Robert Strassburg (piano, advanced harmony, and orchestration, 1948–1950).

See also[edit]

Accordion music genres
Bolero
Easy listening
Secular Jewish music
Wedding music

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allegro, American Federation of Musicians, New York, January 2004, Vol CIV, Obituary and the date of death for John Serry listed as Sept. 14, 2003 as posted by his son John Serry Jr. No. 1. Archived 2006-05-28 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ a b "John Serrapica from Assembly District 16 Brooklyn in 1940 Census District 24-1722". Archives.com.
  3. ^ Settel, Irving (1967) [1960]. A Pictorial History of Radio. New York: Grosset & Dunlap. p. 146. LCCN 67-23789. OCLC 1475068. (See photograph showing Serry seated as the accordionist in the orchestra above the caption "The Latin-American artist Juan Arvizu with the CBS Pan American Orchestra conducted by Alfredo Antonini"
  4. ^ The New York Times, January 8, 1941, p. 18
  5. ^ The New York Times, January 1, 1942, p. 27
  6. ^ The New York Times, May 10, 1942, p. SM10
  7. ^ The New York Times, February 28, 1943, p. X9
  8. ^ Time, June 1, 1942.
  9. ^ a b Media Sound & Culture in Latin America & The Caribbean. Editors: Bronfman, Alejandra & Wood, Andrew Grant. University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, PA, 2012, p. 49 ISBN 978-0-8229-6187-1 Alfredo Antonini's CBS Pan American Orchestra, "Viva America" and Latin American music in the United States on Books.Google.Cmm See p. 49
  10. ^ a b c Vargas, Deborah R. (August 29, 2012). Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of la Onda. U of Minnesota Press. pp. 153–157. ISBN 9780816673162 – via Google Books.
  11. ^ The biographical profile on the album Squeeze Play shows "John Serry...appearing as a soloist at the Radio City Music Hall" - on archive.org
  12. ^ a b c d Accordion News, March, 1935
  13. ^ Accordion News, November, 1937.
  14. ^ Accordion World, March, 1946, Vol. 11 #11
  15. ^ a b c The Los Angeles Examiner, October 9, 1938, p. 1
  16. ^ Tempo - "Accordionists Stage a 'Jam Session'" Vol 6, No. 3, 1938 p. 4 Photograph and caption identifying John Serry in concert at the Stevens Hotel. See the link on this page to "EmPO - World Radio History" at https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-All-Music/Music-Miscellaneous/Tempo-1938-09.pdf
  17. ^ a b The New York Times, May 12, 1946, p. 42
  18. ^ The Nation, March 7, 1942, Vol. 154, #10
  19. ^ a b "Diseuse in Debut Here". The New York Times, March 1, 1942, p. 36
  20. ^ The New York Times, May 28, 1941, p. 32
  21. ^ a b "Accordion World" Gerstner Publications, 1948 Vo. 14 p. 6 John Serry accordioinst with the Mischa Borr Orcehstra at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel on Google Books
  22. ^ a b "Current Attratcions: Theatre Timetable: Rajah Accordion Concert: featuring John Serry" Reading Eagle, May 3, 1953 p. 38 on Books Google
  23. ^ a b New York Journal-American (see the photograph of Serry's signature inscribed with signatures of other members of the cast on the stage door of the Empire Theatre at the closing of the play The Time of the Cuckoo), May 25, 1953, p. 15
  24. ^ "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra - Under Direction of Joe Biviano" Coral Records (CRL-57323, 1960) See the album cover's credits for performers including John Serry "who has worked under such eminent conductors as Alfredo Antonini, Mitch Miller and Shep Fields. Phonograph album photographed on Discogs.com
  25. ^ The biographical profile on the album Squeeze Play shows "John Serry toured the United States with Shep Fields' Orchestra..and appeared under the direction of Andre Kostelanetz, Percy Faith and Alfredo Antonini and others" on archive.org
  26. ^ "Accordion World" Gerstner Publications 1948 Vo. 14 p. 6 John Serry accordioinst with the Mischa Borr Orcehstra at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel on Google Books
  27. ^ "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra - Under Direction of Joe Biviano" Coral Records (CRL-57323, 1960) See album cover for the performers' credits including: "John Serry who has worked under such eminent conductors as Alfredo Antonini, Mitch Miller and Shep Fields". Phonograph of album cover as photographed on Discogs.com
  28. ^ John Serrapica (son of Pasquale & Anna Serrapica) and his siblings: Louis, Carmela, Silvie, Ida, Nancy, Romeo, Julio, Rose, in the US Census of 1940, Kings County, NY on archives.com
  29. ^ Benito Serrapica (son of Pasquale & Anna Serrapica) and his siblings: Louis, John, Carmela, Silvie, Ida, Nancy, Romeo, Julio in the US Census of 1940 Kings County, NY on archives.com
  30. ^ Madeline Serrapic (daughter of Pasquale & Anna Serrapica) and her siblings: Louis, John, Carmela, Silvie, Ida, Nancy, Romeo, Julio in the US Census of 1940 Kings County, NY on archives.com
  31. ^ Enrollment of Pasquale and Anna Serrapicia and their children: Vincent, Louis, Adolf, John, Carmela, Sylvia, Ida listed on lines #33-41 in the Records of the Bureau of the Census - 1920 Population - Kings County, New York, National Archives No. 91851107 in the National Archives Catalog at https://catalog.archives.gov/id/91851107
  32. ^ The Statue of Liberty - Ellis Island Foundation - Passenger Search -- Pasquale Serrapica on heritage.statueofliberty.org
  33. ^ Encyclopedia of Jazz Musicians: John Serry - biography of John Serry Jr. the original family name Serrapica is from Gragnano, Italy on jazz.com
  34. ^ "New York Court of Appeals, Records and Briefs 1919 City of New York p. 840, Entry # 2519 - Sworn testimony under oath in 1919 by Pasquale Serrapica that he is an Italian owner of a grocery store on Navy Street in Brooklyn, NY where he has lived for fourteen years- on Books Google.com
  35. ^ United States Census 1940: John Serrapica & family members residing on 18th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY on archives.com
  36. ^ "Today on the Radio". The New York Times. 2 December 1930. ProQuest 98745168.
  37. ^ a b Directory and Instrumentation: Local #802 American federation of Musicians, Associated Musicians of Greater New York. Publisher: American Federation of Musicians- Local 802, New York 1934 p. 398 John Serrapica on Google.com/books
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Biography", Accordion World, March 1946, Vol. 11, #11, p. 3
  39. ^ "American Accordionists' Association" Photograph of founding members includes Gene Von Hallburg and Joe Biviano March 9, 1938 on ameraccord.com
  40. ^ The Free Reed journal - "1939 Magnante Concert at Carnegie Hall Part 3 -As Thousands Cherred" reprinted from Accordionin World, New York, NY, May 1939. Gene Von Hallberg & the Charles Magnante Quartet: Abe Goldman &Joe Biviano at Carnegie Hall, 1939 on www.ksanti.net
  41. ^ The Musician - "Thumbnail Reviews - New York Recitals in Retrospect--Carnegie Hall -review of the Charles Magnanate Quartet with Gene Von Hallberg at Carnegie Hall, May 1939 p. 84 on Google Books
  42. ^ "Squeeze This: A Cultural History of the Accordion in America". Jacobson, Marion. University of Illinois Press, 2012, p. 50-51 (Chapter Two: SqueezeBox Bach: The Classical Accordion) on google.com/books
  43. ^ a b c d Jacobson, Marion S. (2007). "Searching for Rockordion: The Changing Image of the Accordion in America". American Music. 25 (2): 216–247. doi:10.2307/40071656. JSTOR 40071656.
  44. ^ "Today on the Radio". The New York Times. 6 January 1931. ProQuest 99529553.
  45. ^ "Today on the Radio". The New York Times. 15 January 1931. ProQuest 99511360.
  46. ^ "Today on the Radio; OUTSTANDING EVENTS ON THE AIR TODAY". The New York Times. 22 January 1931. ProQuest 99509304.
  47. ^ A Passion for Polka: Old-Time Ethnic Music in America. Greene, Victor. University of California Press, 1992 p. 124 Paul Whiteman featured the accordion on Google Books.com
  48. ^ Music in American Life: An Encyclopedia of the Songs, Styles, Stars and Stories that Shaped Our Culture. Edmondson, Jacqueline. ABC-CLIO, 2013, p. 3. "Accordion" - accordionists gain acceptance in dance bands, jazz ensembles and big bands on GoogleBooks.com
  49. ^ Notes on the album Squeeze Play by John Serry: "John Serry...toured the United States with Shep Fields' Orchestra" - See the album on archive.org
  50. ^ "Shep Fields Theme Song recorded for Mr. Oberstein / Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra" - John Serry (instrumentalist accordion) on the Discography of American Historical Recordings
  51. ^ a b c Rust, Brian (1975). The American Dance Band Discography 1917-1942: Irving Aaronson to Arthur Lange. Arlington House. pp. 516–517. ISBN 978-0-87000-248-9.
  52. ^ "Discography of American Historical Recordings" - John Serry on adp.library.ucsb.edu
  53. ^ Tempo - "Accordionists Stage a 'Jam Session'" Vol 6, No. 3, 1938 p. 4 Photograph and caption identifying John Serry, Andy Arcari, Anthony Mecca, Domenic Mecca, Pietro Deiro and Joe Biviano in concert at the Stevens Hotel. Google search for "John Serry AFM" and click on "EmPo- World Radio History" or See the link on this page at https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-All-Music/Music-Miscellaneous/Tempo-1938-09.pdf
  54. ^ A Passion for Polka: Old-Time Ethnic Music in America. Greene, Victor. University of California Press, 1992 p. 124 Pietro Deiro & Joe Biviano: virtuoso accordionists of the decade following the mid 1920s on Google Books.com
  55. ^ Tempo - "Accordionists Stage a 'Jam Session'" Vol 6, No. 3, 1938 p. 4 Photograph and caption identifying John Serry, Andy Arcari, Anthony Mecca, Domenic Mecca, Pietro Deiro and Joe Biviano in concert at the Stevens Hotel. Google search for "John Serry AFM" and click on "EmPo- World Radio History" or See the link on this page to at https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-All-Music/Music-Miscellaneous/Tempo-1938-09.pdf
  56. ^ Time - "Music: Accordionist" Andy Arcari in recital at the Philadelphia Academy of Music in May 1938 on content.time.com
  57. ^ The Musician - "Thumbnail Reviews - New York Recitals in Retrospect--Carnegie Hall -review of the Charles Magnanate Quartet with Gene Von Hallberg, Abe Goldman, Anthony Mecca, Domenic Mecca, Joe Biviano at Carnegie Hall, May 1939 p. 84 on Google Books
  58. ^ The Free-Reed Journal - "1939 Magnante Concert at Carnegie Hall: Part 3 As thousands Cheered" -Mganante, Biviano, Anthony Mecca, Domenic Mecca, Gene Von Hallberg, Abe Goldman in the first accordion recital held at Carnegie Hall on 4/18/1939 on ksanti.net/free-reed/essays/cheered.html
  59. ^ Jacobson, Marion S. (2012). "Squeezebox Bach-The Classical Accordion". Squeeze this! : a cultural history of the accordion in America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-03675-0. OCLC 826684860.
  60. ^ Encyclopedia of Jazz Musicians: John Serry - biography of John Serry Jr. one of four children raised by John and Julia Serry on jazz.com
  61. ^ Encyclopedia of Jazz Musicians: John Serry - biography of John Serry Jr. - the family name of Serrapica was shortened by John Serry Sr to Serry on jazz.com
  62. ^ The New York Times, November 18, 1945, p. 50
  63. ^ a b c d e f g h "Who Is Who In Music International 1958", Who Is Who In Music International, Chicago, IL. Biographical File # B11719. See International Biographical Center, Cambridge, England as current publisher.
  64. ^ Music Around The World: A Global Encyclopedia . Andrew Martin & Matthew Mihalka editors. "Accordion (Americas) p. 3 Accordion performers on the radio: Charles Magnante on Google Books
  65. ^ "Marianne Lorraine" performs at Town Hall", The Nation, March 7, 1942, p. 10 on archive.ph
  66. ^ a b "DISEUSE IN DEBUT HERE; Marianne Lorraine Presents 'One Woman Theatre' at Town Hall". The New York Times. 1 March 1942. ProQuest 106170249.
  67. ^ Free World Vol. 2 p. 94 "The Free world Association presents Marianne Oswald...John Serry accordionist...Patroness Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt" - Free World Association Eleanor Roosevelt Feb. 1942 on Google Books
  68. ^ Free World - A Monthly Magazine devoted to Democracy, p. 94 "The Free World Association presents...Marianne Oswald...John Serry accordionist...Town Hall, February28, 1942" Free World Association Marianne Oswald 1942 on Google Books
  69. ^ a b "Players Magazine: The National Journal of Educational Dramatics...Vols 18-21" --Review of "Miss Lorraine's rendition of poems...against a background of music by distinguished contemporary musicians...John Serry on the accordion" on Books Google
  70. ^ The Players Magazine - National Journal of Educational Dramatics. Vol. 18–19. National Collegiate Players. 1941. p. 25. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  71. ^ Settel, Irving (1967) [1960]. A Pictorial History of Radio. New York: Grosset & Dunlap. p. 146. LCCN 67-23789. OCLC 1475068. (See the photograph showing Serry seated as the accordionist in the orchestra above the caption "The Latin-American artist Juan Arvizu with the CBS Pan American Orchestra conducted by Alfredo Antonini")
  72. ^ "A Pictorial History of Radio" by Irving Settel Caption for the photograph of the CBS Pan American Orchestra with Juan Arvizu conducted by Alfredo Antonini on Page 146 on Books.Google. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  73. ^ a b The New York Times, November 5, 1983, p. 34
  74. ^ Notes on the album Squeeze Play by John Serry: "John Serry...appeared under the direction of Alfredo Antonini" - See the album on archive.org
  75. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Photograph of John Serry accordionist on CBS' C de Las A program circa 1940s p. 3, Series 3, Collection Box 3, Item 1: The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  76. ^ Goldin, J. David. "Copyright 2018, J. David Goldin". Radiogoldindex.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2012. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  77. ^ The New York Times, June 9, 1946, p. 49
  78. ^ Vargas, Deborah R. (November 26, 2018). Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of la Onda. University of Minnesota Press. p. 166. ISBN 9780816673162. Retrieved November 26, 2018 – via Google Books.
  79. ^ Media Sound & Culture in Latin America & The Caribbean. Editors: Bronfman, Alejandra & Wood, Andrew Grant. University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, PA, 2012, p. 49; ISBN 978-0-8229-6187-1 Pan-Americanism & CBS & "Viva America" on Books.Google.com See pp. 48-49
  80. ^ "New York Philharmonic". archives.nyphil.org. Retrieved December 29, 2022.
  81. ^ CBS Pan American Orchestra, Alfredo Antonini, Terig Tucci, Juan Arvizu, Nestor Chayres, Elsa Miranda, "Viva America" on Books.Google.com See p. 49
  82. ^ a b "Biography". Accordion World. Vol. 11, no. 11. Bedford Hills, New York. March 1946. p. 3.
  83. ^ The New York Times, January 18, 1942, p. 27
  84. ^ The New York Times, January 17, 1942, p. 30
  85. ^ The New York Times, January 16, 1942, p. 19
  86. ^ The New York Times, January 14, 1942, p. 24
  87. ^ The New York Times, May 5, 1941, p. 32
  88. ^ The New York Times, April 23, 1944, p. X5
  89. ^ The New York Times, January 23, 1944, p. X9
  90. ^ Bronfman, Alejandra; Wood, Andrew Grant, eds. (2012). Media, Sound, and Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press. p. 49. ISBN 978-0-8229-6187-1.
  91. ^ "Banana E.T. Proves Good Eating for Elsa Miranda". Billboard. February 2, 1946. pp. 3–. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  92. ^ Bratkovich, Colin (May 8, 2014). Just Remember This. Xlibris. p. 173. ISBN 978-1-4836-4519-3. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  93. ^ Beyond the Black and White TV: Asian and Latin American Spectacle in Cold War America. Han, Benjamin M. Rutgers University Press, 2022 "Viva America" Edmund Chester and Los Panchos on Google Books
  94. ^ The Billboard - Music Popularity Charts: Alfredo Antonini and his Viva America Orchestra record album with Los Panchos Trio (Pilotone 5067) November 16, 1946, p. 29 on books.google
  95. ^ Photograph of Los Panchos Trio and Manolita Arriola on the Viva America Show 1946 on Getty Images
  96. ^ Photograph of Manolita Arriola and Nestor Chayres for "Viva America" 1946 CBS on Getty Images
  97. ^ a b OCIAA, CBS' Cadena de las Americas, Edmund Chester, Viva America, Office of War Information & Armed Forces Radio Service Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music the Limits of La Onda. Vargas, Deborah. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN, 2012 p. 152-155 on Google Books
  98. ^ Time - Radio: La Cadena, June 1, 1942 William S. Paley, Edmund Chester, La Cadena de las Americas -CBS broadcast network to South America for news and cultural programs on Content.time.com
  99. ^ Mackenzie, Harry (26 November 1999). The Directory of the Armed Forces Radio Service Series. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. H 21. ISBN 9780313308123. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via Google Books.
  100. ^ The Directory of the Armed Forces Radio Service Series H-21 VIVA AMERICA on Google Book
  101. ^ Victor matrix D6FB-2220 Audio recording of "Dark Night" -vocalist Sidor Belarsky, accordionist John Serry on Discography of American Historical Recordings - University of California Santa Barbara Library. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  102. ^ Victor Matrix D6FB-2221 Audio recording of "Hobo Song" -vocalist Sidor Belarsky, accordionist John Serry on Discography of American Historical Recordings - University of California Santa Barbara Library. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  103. ^ Victor Matrix D6FB-2222 Audio recording of "By the Cradle" -vocalist Sidor Belarsky, accordionist John Serry on Discography of American Historical Recordings - University of California Santa Barbara Library. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  104. ^ Katusha Victor Matrix D6FB-2223 Audio recording of "By the Cradle" -vocalist Sidor Belarsky, accordionist John Serry on Discography of American Historical Recordings - University of California Santa Barbara Library. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  105. ^ John Serry accordionist, Sidor Belarsky vocalist & Mischa Borr Orchestra recordings listed on The University of California Santa Barbara Library's Discography of American Historical Recordings. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  106. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Item 8 audio disc p. 18 in The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  107. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 4 Recordings: Item 9 p. 18, 12" audio disk of John Serry's guest appearance on the Danny O'Neil Show in the John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of music on esm.rochester.edu
  108. ^ a b Joe Biviano, his Accordion and Rhythm Sextette; Tom Delaney; John Serry. "Leone Jump; Swing Low, Sweet Chariot; The Jazz Me Blues; Nursery Rhymes". Archive.org. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  109. ^ a b Joe Biviano, his Accordion and Rhythm Sextette (November 26, 2018). "Accordion Capers". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  110. ^ a b "The Sonora Label". Campber.people.clemson.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  111. ^ a b c "Record Reviews". Billboard. April 27, 1946. p. 124. ISSN 0006-2510.
  112. ^ a b c d "Classic Jazz Guitar - Albums". November 7, 2002. Archived from the original on 2002-11-07. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  113. ^ The Free-Reed Review- "CD Review: The K Trio" by Henry Doktowski - "Fantasy in F" by John Serry likened to Zez Confrey's "Dizzy Fingers" on ksanti.net
  114. ^ The Music Magazine/Musical Courier Volumes 133-134 1946 p. 34 Acordion World Concert at Manhattan Center...Joe Biviano, Angelo Dellairia, John Serry accordionists on Google Books
  115. ^ "BnF Catalogue général". Catalogue.bnf.fr (in French). Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  116. ^ "Manhattan Hop by Joe Biviano, RCA Victor Accordion Orchestra (20-3388-B), John Serry". Archive.org. Retrieved 8 December 2021.
  117. ^ John Serry (aka John Serrapica) as a member of the Magnante Accordion Band on the University of California - Santa Barbara Library's: Discography of American Historical Recordings at adp.library.ucsb.edu. Accessed December 29, 2022.
  118. ^ "American Accordionists' Association" Photograph of founding members including Charles Magnante and Joe Biviano, March 9, 1938 on ameraccord.com
  119. ^ The Accordion of the Americas: Klezmer, Polka, Tango, Zydeco and More! Simonett, Helena. University of Illinois Press 2012 p. 169 ISBN 9780252037207 Citation for Charles Magnanate and Joe Biviano identified as cofounders of the American Accordionists' Association (1939) on Google Books
  120. ^ A Passion for Polka: Old-Time Ethnic Music in America. Greene, Victor. University of California Press, 1992 pp. 124-125 Accordion craze nationwide on Google Books.com
  121. ^ A Passion for Polka: Old-Time Ethnic Music in America. Greene, Victor. University of California Press, 1992 pp. 124-125 Accordion craze and accordion studio enrollments soar on Google Books.com
  122. ^ Music in American Life: An An Encyclopedia of the Songs, Styles, Stars and Stories that Shaped Our Culture. Edmondson, Jacqueline. ABC-CLIO, 2013, p. 3. "Accordion" - accordion schools appear nationwide enrolling hundreds of thousands of young students on GoogleBooks.com
  123. ^ "Accordion USA"- A Boy and His Box by Joe De Clemente - John Serry identified as an accordion teacher in Jamaica, Queens in 1961 on accordionusa.com
  124. ^ The biographical profile on the album Squeeze Play shows "John Serry...devoted himself to the teaching of his chosen instrument" on archive.org
  125. ^ "Auricle is Gliding with Good Reviews". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester, New York. 7 July 1978. p. 13. Retrieved 25 July 2018.
  126. ^ "2005 Honoree - Tony Ettore". Archived from the original on 2011-07-07. Retrieved 2011-07-07.
  127. ^ "Robert Davine: 1924–2001". Ksanti.net. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  128. ^ Interview with John Serry: Can Jazz be a creative progressive art form? February 7, 2018 John Serry Jr. identifies his father John Serry as his first instructor on the accordion at the age of 4-11 on jazzbluesnews.com
  129. ^ Democrate and Chronicle July 7, 1978 p. 13 John Serry Jr. (pianist) is the son of John Serry -an instructor of piano and accordion, studies accordion at the age of four with his father on democrateandchronicle.newspapers.com
  130. ^ American Accordionists' Association Newsletter: "AAA Competitions in the '50s", May-June 2020 p. 13 John Serry music studio on ameraccord.com/search.php
  131. ^ "Accordion Weekly News". Accordions.com. May 19, 2000. Retrieved July 25, 2018.
  132. ^ a b John Serry's Accordion Method Book 3 Intermediate Course (1955) on worldcat.org
  133. ^ a b LC Catalog - Item Information (Full Record). Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via lccn.loc.gov.
  134. ^ Jacobson, Marion (2012). Squeeze This!: A Cultural History of the Accordion in America. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press. p. 61. ISBN 978-0-252-03675-0.
  135. ^ "Mama". Classicthemes.com. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  136. ^ Eastman School of Music: Sibley Music Library Special Collections - John J. Serry Sr. Collection Archive: Series 4 Recordings - Item #5, p. 18 Audio Recording of John Serry and his son Robert on the show Live Like A Millionaire. October 22, 1951 the John J. Serry Sr. Collection on Google.com
  137. ^ Radio: A Complete Guide to the Industry. Richter, William A. P. Lang Publisher. 2006 p. 50 "Radio Talent Shows: Live Like A Millionaire" ISBN 978-08204-76339 Live Like A Millionaire Radio Show on google Books
  138. ^ "African Bolero", "Desert Rhumba" Musical Scores, Composer John Serry, Dedicatee Julius Baker. See John Serry on Worldcat.org
  139. ^ "La Culebra" Musical Score, Composer John Serry, Dedicatee Julius Baker. See John Serry on worldcat.org
  140. ^ "See hand written dedication notes "written for and dedicated to my friend Julius Baker, 1951" on Page # 3 of the score". Library.juilliard.edu. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  141. ^ "See handwritten dedication notes "written for and dedicated to my friend Julius Baker, 1951" on Page # 3 of the score". Library.juilliard.edu. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  142. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 4- Item #6 p. 18, 10" audio disc recording of "Desert Rhumba" & "The Rattlesnake" (La Culebra)" composer John Serry, flautist Julie Baker" in the John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  143. ^ International Musician - "Accordion Instrument Played with A Smile", Hope Stoddard, May 1951, p. 10-11 Contributing writers Charles Nunzio & Sergei Matsusewitch - Photograph of John Serry within the article published in the journal International Musician by the American Federation of Musicians posted on worldradiohistory.com
  144. ^ International Musician - "Accordion Instrument Played with A Smile", Hope Stoddard, May 1951, p. 10-11 Contributing writers Charles Nunzio & Sergei Matsusewitch - Photographs of: Louis Del Monte, Pietro Frosini, Charles Nunzio, Charles Magnante , Anthony Galla-Rini, Art Van Damme within the article as published in the journal International Musician by the American Federation of Musicians posted on worldradiohistory.com
  145. ^ PTM, Piano trade Publishing Vol. 50 1953 p. 46 John J. Serry accordionist on Google books
  146. ^ Notes on the album Squeeze Play show "John Serry...appearing under the musical direction of Andre Kostelanetz" - See the album on archive.org
  147. ^ William Howland Kenney (November 2003). Recorded Music in American Life: The Phonograph and Popular Memory, 1890–1945. Oxford University Press. pp. 191–. ISBN 978-0-19-517177-8.
  148. ^ Radio Daily-Television Daily. Publisher: Radio Daily Corporation 29 October 1954, p. 8 - "RCA Thesaurus cut a session of Latin-American music, polkas, and novelties with the John Serry Accordion Quartet", RCA Thesaurus John Serry on Google Books
  149. ^ Eastman School of Music: Sibley Music Library: Ruth T. Watanabe Special Collections Dept.- "The John Serry Sr. Collection" - Items donated to the library for archive include an audio recording by the Serry Sextette and his Bel-Cordions for RCA Thesaurus on www.esm.rochester.edu
  150. ^ The Billboard: "Selvin to Quit Peer for RCA" - Ben Selvin appointed as A & R Manager for RCA Victor Custom Records Division - Thesaurus Library, February 14, 1953 p. 17 on Google Books
  151. ^ The Billboard: "Friends Fete Ben Selvin As He Leaves Industry" - In 1953 he started his decade with RCA Victor, March 23, 1963 p. 3 & p. 6 on Google Books
  152. ^ a b "Celebrating National Music Week - Accordion Concert" : John Serry - p. 12...appearing with award winner Shirly Booth in "Time of the Cuckoo" See photograph and caption of John Serry in the "Reading Eagle" April 19, 1953 p. 12 on Google Books
  153. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection - Series 3: Scrapbook - contains a clipping with a photograph from the "New York Journal American" May 25, 1953 p. 15 showing the stage cast door from the Empire Theater with Shirley Booth pointing to signatures of the cast of "The Time of the Cuckoo" which includes John Serry's signatue. The John J. Serry Sr. Collection p. 17 Series 3 Scrapbook Box 3 Item 1 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music on esm.rochester.edu
  154. ^ "Library of Congress- Music and Phonorecords Catalog 1953", p. 881 - "U. S. School of Music" - John Serry arranger, Lawrence Welk editor on google.com/books
  155. ^ "Statement of George R. Kemp, President U.S. School of Music" -The United States Congress Senate Committee on Post Office and Civil Service - 1962 p. 739 on Google Books
  156. ^ "U. S. Music School - Music Lessons...From Fine Teachers....John Serry-piano accordion" on Google Books
  157. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder 4- Folder 8 p. 14 as archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  158. ^ "Dot Album Discography" DLP-3024 Squeeze Play - John Serry (1956) on bsnpubs.com
  159. ^ "Dot into Pkgs". Billboard. 8 September 1956. pp. 22–. ISSN 0006-2510.
  160. ^ a b Review of album Squeeze Play, p. 22 in The Billboard, 1 December 1956
  161. ^ Colin Larkin, ed. (2002). The Virgin Encyclopedia of Fifties Music (Third ed.). Virgin Books. pp. 466/7. ISBN 1-85227-937-0
  162. ^ "Billy Vaughn is Dead; Jazz Musician was 72", New York Times Obituary -"Billy Vaughn was music director for Dot Records", September 28, 1991 on Google Books
  163. ^ "Billy Vaughn" Biography on encyclopedia.com
  164. ^ Gilliland, John (1969). "T-Z – Interview Index" (audio). Pop Chronicles. University of North Texas Libraries.
  165. ^ Biography of Billy Vaughn : Vaughn becomes music director of Dot Records in 1954 on grandorchestras.com
  166. ^ a b c "Billboard". December 1, 1956. p. 22 – via Google Books.
  167. ^ a b c d e Review of the album "Squeeze Play" in "The Cash Box" magazine - See Album Reviews column on December 8, 1956 p. 38 on americanradiohistory.com
  168. ^ Notes on the album Squeeze Play describe Serry's oringinal composition Garden In Monaco - See the album on archive.org
  169. ^ "Garden in Monaco"; composer John Serry on BMI Songview catalog
  170. ^ "Chicago Musette, John Serry". Vintagemusic.fm. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  171. ^ a b "BnF Catalogue général". Catalogue.bnf.fr. 26 November 2018. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  172. ^ a b "John Serry - Topic". YouTube. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  173. ^ a b Album: Ballroom in Dreamland featuring music by the Billy Vaughn Orchestra and the John Serry Orchestra on discogs.com
  174. ^ Ballroom in Dreamland - Audio album featuring performances by the Billy Vaughn Orchestra and John Serry on cdandlp.com
  175. ^ a b Library of Congress Copyright Office, American Rhapsody, Composer: John Serry Sr., Copyright: Alpha Music, New York, New York, 1957
  176. ^ Music Trades: "Accordion Orchestra Featured on New Coral 12" Record" Vol. 109, 1961 p. 84 John Serry on Google Books
  177. ^ "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra - Under Direction of Joe Biviano" Coral Records (CRL-57323, 1960) See album cover for performers credits including John Serry, Eugene Ettore, Carmen Carrozza and Angelo Di Pippo. Pietro Deiro on Discogs.com
  178. ^ Pietro The Billboard- Reviews and Ratings of New albums: "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra" (Coral, CRL-57323), 27 June 1960 p. 33 Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra on Google Books
  179. ^ The Coral Album Discography. Edwards, David. Callahan, Mike. Eyrles, Patrice. Watts, Randy. Neely, Timothy. April 27, 2014. CRL-57323 "Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra" (1960) on bsnpubs.com
  180. ^ Pietro The Billboard- Reviews and Ratings of New albums "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra" (Coral, CRL-57323), 27 June 1960 p. 33 Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra on Google Books
  181. ^ "Pietro Deiro Presents the Piano Accordion" See album cover notes. on Worldcat.org
  182. ^ Pietro Deiro, Joe Biviano The Accordion Orchestra (Coral, CRL-57323) See credits on album. Audio recording on Discogs.com
  183. ^ Pietro The Billboard- Reviews and Ratings of New albums: "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra" (Coral, CRL-57323), 27 June 1960 p. 33 Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra on Google Books
  184. ^ "The Library of Congress Copyright Office - Public Catalog 1978 - Present, "Concerto in C major for Free Bass Accordion" (Revised for Piano), Composer: John Serry Sr". Cocatalog.loc.gov. 2002. Copyright # PAU 3-336-024
  185. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection score "Concetro in C Major (1967) for Free Bass Accordion " Folder 15 & 16 p. 10 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  186. ^ a b Music in American Life: An Encyclopedia of the Songs, Styles, Stars and Stories that Shaped Our Culture. Edmondson, Jacqueline. ABC-CLIO, 2013, p. 3. "Accordion" - Accordion & rock and roll on GoogleBooks.com
  187. ^ Music Around The World: A Global Encyclopedia . Andrew Martin & Matthew Mihalka editors. "Accordion (Americas) p. 4 Accordion and rock and roll music on Google Books
  188. ^ Music Around The World: A Global Encyclopedia . Andrew Martin & Matthew Mihalka editors. "Accordion (Americas) p. 4 "Accordion" - the accordion is seen as a square relic and replaced by the guitar during the 1960s on GoogleBooks.com
  189. ^ Music in American Life: An An Encyclopedia of the Songs, Styles, Stars and Stories that Shaped Our Culture. Edmondson, Jacqueline. ABC-CLIO, 2013, p. 3. "Accordion" - In the late 1950s young people reject the accordion as old fashioned & take up the electric guitar, electric piano and electronic organ on GoogleBooks.com
  190. ^ "Squeeze This: A Cultural History of the Accordion in America". Jacobson, Marion. University of Illinois Press, 2012, p. 67 on google.com/books
  191. ^ The New York Times, 21 June 1964, p. 84
  192. ^ The New York Times, 9 June 1965, p. 47
  193. ^ The New York Times, 14 June 1987, p. LI22
  194. ^ The New York Times14 June 1987, P. New York Region
  195. ^ a b Mitchell, Ellen (14 June 1987). "Interfaith Chapels in Demand". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  196. ^ "Beyond Chrismukkah: the Christian-Jewish Interfaith Family". Mehta, Samira K., university of North Carolina Press, 2018, p. 22 on google.com/books
  197. ^ Rabbi Nathaniel Schwart officiates at the C. W. Post Interfaith Chapel
  198. ^ Rabbi Nathaniel Schwartz and Rev. John Heinlein officiate at the C. W. Post Interfaith Chapel
  199. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection: Series 3, p. 6 - Scrapbook containing musical programs as archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  200. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection score "Processional March (1951, Revised for Organ 1968)" Folder 18 p. 10 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  201. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection score "Concetro in C Major (1967) for Free Bass Accordion " Folders: 26, 27, 28, p. 12 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  202. ^ Allegro, American Federation of Musicians, New York, January 2004, Vol CIV, No. 1. Archived 2006-05-28 at the Wayback Machine
  203. ^ "Players". National Collegiate Players. 26 November 2018. Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via Google Books.
  204. ^ The New Records. Latin American Music - Alfredo Antonini and Viva America orchestra H. Royer Smith Co., Philadelphia, PA, Vol. 14, No. 8 October 1946, P. 6-7 Latin American Music - Alfredo Antonini and Viva America Orchestra critical review of the album in The New Records P. 6-7 on archive.org
  205. ^ Pietro The Billboard- Reviews and Ratings of New albums: "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra" (Coral, CRL-57323), 27 June 1960 p. 33 Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra on Google Books
  206. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Desert Rumba" score p. 10 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  207. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Glissando, Composer John Serry, 1946, Copyright #EP8078 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1946 Musical Compositions Title Index New Series Vol. 41 Pt. 3, Pg. 179
  208. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Glissando" score p. 9 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  209. ^ "Tarantella by John Serry archived at Oxford University, London". worldcat.org. 1946. Retrieved 20 July 2023.
  210. ^ Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilich (1946). "Valse ... Arranged by John Serry. Accordion Solo". The europeanlibrary.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  211. ^ Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilich (1946). "Valse...arranged by John Serry. Accordion Solo". worldcat.org. Retrieved 20 July 2023.
  212. ^ "CD Review: The K Trio Images". The Free-Reed Review, Henry Doktorski
  213. ^ "Fantasy in F by John Serry archived at Oxford University, London". worldcat.org. 1946. Retrieved 20 July 2023.
  214. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Fantasy in F" score p. 9, orchestral arrangement score p. 13 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  215. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Invitation to Jive" score p. 8 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  216. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Consolation Waltz,Composer John Serry, O.Pagani & Bro., New York, 29 November 1949, Copyright # EP58852 Library of Congress Copyright Office Catalog Published Music 1951 Vol.5 Part 5a, #1 P. 605 on Books.google.com
  217. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Uncle Charlie's Polka,Composer John Serry, O. Pagani & Bro., New York, 29 November 1949, Copyright # EP58854 Library of Congress Copyright Office Catalog Published Music 1951 Vol.5 Part 5a, #1 P. 605 on Books.google.com
  218. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Bugle Polka,Composer John Serry, O.Pagani Bro., New York, 29 November 1949 Copyright #EP5883 Library of Congress Copyright Office Catalog Published Music 1951 Vol.5 Part 5a, #1 P. 605 on Books.google.com
  219. ^ The Bugle Polka by John Serry (1949) on Worldcat.org
  220. ^ "Sonora Records 78rpm numerical listing discography". 78discography.com. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  221. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Leone Jump, Composer John Serry, 1946, Copyright # EP8079 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1946 Musical Compositions Title Index New Series Vol. 41 Pt. 3, Pg. 355
  222. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Leona Jump" orchestral score for 3 accordions, bass, rhythmic guitar & electric guitar p. 8 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  223. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office,La Culebra, Composer John Serry Sr., March 7, 1951, Copyright # EU 233726
  224. ^ "John Serry Sr. 1915 - 2003 La Culebra". Worldcat.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  225. ^ La Culebra - Flute solo, composer John Serry & dedicated on the score as "written for and dedicated to my friend Julius Baker, 1951" in the Julius Baker Music Collection Archive on Julicat at library.juilliard.edu
  226. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection ""La Culebra" acore p. 8 & p. 9 score John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  227. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, African Bolero Composer: John Serry Sr., March 7, 1951, Copyright # EU 233725
  228. ^ "John Serry Sr. 1915 - 2003 - African Bolero". Worldcat.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  229. ^ Peter Jay Sharp Special Collections -- Julius Baker Collection
  230. ^ African Bolero - Flute solo, composer John Serry & dedicated on the score as "written for and dedicated to my friend Julius Baker, 1951", in the Julius Baker Music Collection Archive on Julicat at library.juilliard.edu
  231. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "African Bolero" score p. 9 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  232. ^ a b LC Catalog - Item Information (Full Record). Retrieved 26 November 2018 – via lccn.loc.gov.
  233. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, The Syncopated Accordionist, Composer John Serry a.k.a. John Serrapica, Charles Colin, New York 2 March 1953, Copyright #EP69650 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1953 Published Music Jan-Dec, Vol 7, Pt 5A, Pg. 257
  234. ^ The Syncopated Accordionist: Studies in Syncopation (1953) by John Serry on Worldcat.org
  235. ^ "Accordion Method Book 1 & 2" by John Serry on reverb.com
  236. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Rhythm-airs for the Accordionist Charles Colin & Bigs Bower, editor John Serry, Charles Colin, New York Vol. 1-2, 2 March 1953, Copyright #EP69648-69649 Catalog of Copyright Entries 1953 Published Music Jan-Dec Vol 7, Pt 5a, Pg. 58
  237. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Accordion Quartet Arrangements" score p. 13 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  238. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Accordion Quartet Arrangements" score p. 13 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  239. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, Top Ten Accordion Solos - Easy To Play, Publisher Broadcaste Music Inc. (BMI), Arranger John Serry, 12 July 1954, Copyright # A146305 Catalog of Copyright Entries Vol 8 Pt.1 Books and Pamphlets July-December 1954, p. 1405
  240. ^ Junior Accordion Band Series by John Serry on ebay.com
  241. ^ a b c d "BMI - Repertoire Search". Repertoire.bmi.com. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  242. ^ a b c d BMI-Songview Catalogue - songs by John Serry on repertoire.bmi.com
  243. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Tango of Love" score p. 13 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  244. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, The Lost Tango, m. John Serry, Words Edward Steinfeld, New York, New York, 14 June 1956 Copyright #EU440575 Library of Congress Catalog of Copyright Entries 1956 Unpublished Music Jan-Dec. Vol. 10, Part 5a, Pg. 134 on archive.org
  245. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Garden in Monaco" score p. 14 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  246. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Rockin' the Anvil" score p. 14 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  247. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Cocktails in Spain" score p. 14 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  248. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Spooky Polka" score p. 10 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  249. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Reeds in a Rush" draft score p. 10 John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  250. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "American Rhapsody" score p. 10 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  251. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder 4 p. 14 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  252. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder 5 p. 14 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  253. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder 6 p. 14 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  254. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder 7 p. 14 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  255. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection Series 2: Oversized Manuscripts: Folder p. 14-15 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  256. ^ a b c "Rochester Review" July-August 2008, Vol 70, No. 6 University of Rochester Alumnus magazine: River Campus (See Class of 1980) - Son of John Serry notes that his father's compositions and recordings have been submitted into the Sibley Library for archive
  257. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Processional March" score p. 10 John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  258. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office,Falling Leaves, Composer: John Serry Sr., May 21, 1976, Copyright # EU 233726
  259. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Falling Leaves" score p. 11 John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  260. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Elegy" score p. 10 The John J. Serry Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  261. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Three Songs of Love" pp. 11-12 The John J. Serry Sr Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  262. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, A Savior Is Born, Composer: John Serry Sr., November 18, 1991, Copyright # PAU 1-575-137 A Savior is Born on THe United States Copyright Office Online Catalog cocatalog.loc.gov
  263. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "A Savior Is Born" score p. 12 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  264. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Dreams Trilogy" score p. 11 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  265. ^ The Library of Congress Copyright Office, The Lord's Prayer, Composer: John Serry Sr., September 2, 1992, Copyright # PAU 1-665-838 The Lord's Prayer on The United States Copyright Office Online Catalog cocatalog.loc.gov
  266. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "The Lord's Prayer" score p. 12 The john Jerry Sr Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  267. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Lamb of God" score p. 12 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  268. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Five Children's Pieces For Piano" score p. 11 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  269. ^ "Ruth T. Watanabe Special Collections Home". Sibley Music Library. 13 November 2019. Retrieved 12 December 2022. Performers can locate the scores to "American Rhapsody" and "Concerto For Free Bass Accordion" which were donated to the Eastman School of Music's Sibley Music Library's - Ruth T. Watanabe Special Collections Department by contacting the archivist here.
  270. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  271. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "American Rhapsody" score Folder 12 & 19 p. 10 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  272. ^ "The Library of Congress Copyright Office - Public Catalog 1978 - Present, "Concerto in C major for Free Bass Accordion" (Revised for Piano), Composer: John Serry Sr". Cocatalog.loc.gov. 2002. Copyright # PAU 3-336-024
  273. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection score "Concetro in C Major (1967) for Free Bass Accordion " Folder 15 & 16 p. 10 archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music Sibley Music Library Special collections on esm.rochester.edu
  274. ^ Squeeze play. 26 November 2018. OCLC 12935411.
  275. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "Squeeze Play" audio recording of compositions and arrangements by John Serry in "The John J. Serry Sr. Collection" p. 19 archived at the University of Rochester on esm.rochester.edu
  276. ^ a b Eastman School of Music: Sibley Music Library: Ruth T. Watanabe Special Collections Dept. at www.esm.rochester.edu
  277. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection "John Serry Sextette" audio recording for RCA Thesaurus of arrangements and performances by John Serry at the RCA Victor Sudios in 1954 p. 18 The John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester
  278. ^ Radio Daily-Television Daily. Publisher: Radio Daily Corporation 29 October 1954, p. 8 - "RCA Thesaurus cut a session of Latin-American music, polkas, and novelties with the John Serry Accordion Quartet", RCA Thesaurus John Serry on Google Books
  279. ^ The Billboard- Reviews and Ratings of New albums "Pietro Deiro Presents The Accordion Orchestra" (Coral, CRL-57323), 27 June 1960 p. 33 "Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra" Critical Review of the album on Google Books
  280. ^ "Pietro Deiro Presents the Piano Accordion"- See the perfromers' credits and song listings on the record album on Worldcat.org
  281. ^ Pietro Deiro, Joe Biviano The Accordion Orchestra (Coral, CRL-57323). See the notes on the album cover. Photograph of the album on Discogs.com
  282. ^ The Coral Album Discography. Edwards, David. Callahan, Mike. Eyrles, Patrice. Watts, Randy. Neely, Timothy. April 27, 2014. CRL-57323 "Pietro Deiro Presents the Accordion Orchestra" (1960) "The Coral Album Discography" on bsnpubs.com
  283. ^ Music Trades: "Accordion Orchestra Featured on New Coral 12" Record" Vol. 109, 1961 p. 84 John Serry listed as a member of the accordion orchestra on the new Coral record. John Serry on Google Books
  284. ^ Accordion capers. 26 November 2018. OCLC 48679834.
  285. ^ Billboard. Alpha's 12" Latin-Vinylites, New York, Vol. 58 No. 13 30 March 1946, P. 22 Alpha Records release of Alfredo Antonini and Viva America Orchestra in Billboard on books.google.com
  286. ^ Nestor Chayres; Agustin Lara; Alfredo Antonini (30 April 1946). "Granada". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  287. ^ "Chiquita Banana" performed by the Alfredo Antonini Viva America Orchestra & vocalist Elsa Miranda on archive.org
  288. ^ Discography of American Historical Recordings: By the Cradle, John Serry accordionist on uscb.edu
  289. ^ Discography of American Historical Recordings: Katusha, John Serry accordionist on uscb.edu
  290. ^ Discography of American Historical Recordings: Hobo Song, John Serry accordionist on uscb.edu
  291. ^ Discography of American Historical Recordings: Dark Night, John Serry accordionist on uscb.edu
  292. ^ John Serrapica as instrumentalist in the Charles Magnante Accordion Band in 1941 at the University of California Santa Barbara Library's Discography of American Historical Recordings at adp.library.ucsb.edu
  293. ^ a b c John Serrapica as a member of the Charles Magnante Accordion Band on the University of California Santa Barbara Library's Discography of American Historical Recordings at adp.library.ucsb.edu
  294. ^ Luis G. Roldan; Alfredo Antonini y su Orquesta Pan-Americana C.B.S.; Osvaldo Farres. "Tres Palabras". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  295. ^ Luis G. Roldan; Alfredo Antonini y su Orquesta Pan-Americana C.B.S.; M. Sabre Marroquin. "Esta Noche Ha Pasado". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  296. ^ "Asi - Frontera Project". Frontera.library.ucla.edu. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  297. ^ "Somos Diferentes - Frontera Project". Frontera.library.ucla.edu. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  298. ^ Los Panchos Trio; Alfredo Antonini and His Viva America Orchestra. "La Palma; Rosa Negra". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  299. ^ a b c Juan Arvizu and the C. B. S. Tipica Orchestra; Lavidada; DelMoral; Alfredo Antonini; Juan Arvizu; Grever; Juan Arvicu and the C. B. S. Tipica Orchestra; Cortazar; Juan Arvizu and the C. B. S Tipica Orchestra; Valie (28 January 1942). "Viva Sevilla!; Noche de Amor; Mi Sarape; Que Paso?; El Bigote de Tomas; De Donde?". Archive.org. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  300. ^ a b John Serry's audio recordings with the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra on Discography of American Historical Recordings
  301. ^ Audio recording with the Shep Fields Orchestra - "An Old Curiosity Shop" (1938) on the Discography of American Historical Records adp.library.ucsb.edu
  302. ^ The big broadcast of 1938. 26 November 2018. OCLC 934654999.
  303. ^ Protective Shield For Collapsible Paste Tubes #US 3269604 A Inventor John Serry as listed on Google.com/patents
  304. ^ "Official Gazette: United States Patent Office" : # 3,269,604 -Protective Shield For Collapsible Paste Tubes filed by John Serry, August 30, 1966, p. 1973 on google.com/books
  305. ^ Canadian Patent Office Record 1967 Vol 95, p. 7659 -"Protective Shield for Collapsible Paste Tubes...John Serry, USA...May 1966 Serial # 980,449 on Google Books
  306. ^ a b Accordion News & John Serry on Google Books
  307. ^ Accordion News & John Serry on Google Books
  308. ^ Accordion World Vol. 26 No. 1, April 1961, p. 2 "Jazz and the Student Accordionist" by John Serry on Google Books
  309. ^ Eastman School of Music - University of Rochester - Sibley Music Library: John J. Serry Sr. Collection archived at the University of Rochester Eastman School of Music
  310. ^ Discograph of American Historical Recordings - University of California Santa Barbara: Audio recordings of John Serry in the Shep Fields Rippling Rhythm Orchestra
  311. ^ "Requiem - Associated Musicians of Greater New York – Local 802". Associated Musicians of Greater New York - Local 802. January 2004. Retrieved 26 November 2018.

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