John Small (British Army medical officer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Deputy Surgeon-General John Small (28 January 1823 – July 1879) was a British Army officer, physician, and early advocate for the use of large doses of quinine to treat malaria.

Early life[edit]

Small was born in Edinburgh, Scotland,[1] the oldest son of Patrick Small and Mary Brown Small. His father was a silversmith, jeweller and auctioneer on Edinburgh's Advocate's Close. Small and his family were members of the Smalls of Dirnanean.

Career[edit]

Small began his medical career as an apprentice under J. F. MacFarlan in the North Bridge section of Edinburgh.[2] He later attended the University of Edinburgh and the extra-academical school.[2] He received his medical licence from the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1843.[2] After two years in private practice he entered the army in 1845.[2] His first assignment was with the 12th Regiment of Foot at Mauritius.[2] He was later reassigned to Africa to fight in the Cape Frontier Wars, for which he received a medal.[2] He afterwards served as surgeon for the Cape Mounted Riflemen[3] before returning to Mauritius as staff surgeon.[2][4] He was promoted to surgeon-major on 30 December 1865.[5] In 1867 Small co-authored the Report on the Malarial Epidemic Fever of Mauritius of 1866–67, in which large doses of quinine were advocated to treat malaria fever.[6] Small was promoted to deputy surgeon-general in 1875 and placed in charge of medical services in the Woolwich district in London.[2][7]

Death[edit]

Small died at Woolwich in July 1879.[2][8] He was survived by his widow and one daughter.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Scotland, Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950". Church of Later Day Saints, Utah, USA. Retrieved 25 January 2014. reference 2:17PSQ0R; FHL microfilm 1066691 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "The Late Surgeon-General John Small". The Scotsman Newspaper, Edinburgh, Scotland. 4 July 1879. 
  3. ^ Hart, H. G. (1857). "THE NEW ARMY LIST, AND MILITIA LIST. NO LXXIII. 1ST JANUARY, 1857". John Murray, London, England. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "The Mauritius Civil Service Almanac". Dupuy & Bubois, Mauritius. 1862. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  5. ^ Hart, Colonel H. G. (1867). "The New Army List, and Militia List". John Murray, London, England. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  6. ^ Lyons, R. T. (1872). "A Treatise on relapsing or famine fever". Henry S. King, London, England. Retrieved 25 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "The Medical Time and Gazette". J. & A. Churchill. 25 September 1875. p. 378. Retrieved 25 January 2014. Medical News 
  8. ^ "England & Wales, National Probate Calendar, 1861-1941". Ancestry.com, Utah, USA. 1879. p. 2.