John Stewart of Bonkyll

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Arms of John Stewart of Bonkyll (d. 1298): Stewart differenced by a bend sable charged with three buckles or, a buckle being the canting heraldic device of the de Bonkyll family
Memorial Stone, Esplanade Gardens, Rothesay, inscribed: In honour of the Men of Bute who, under the command of Sir John Stewart, fell to a man at the Battle of Falkirk, 22nd July 1298.[1]

Who fought for Wallace on Falkirk's field,
John Stewart's men with sword and shield,
But o'er pow'rd thus! Their fate was sealed,
For freedom fell

Sir John Stewart of Bonkyll (died 22 July 1298) of Bonkyll Castle in Berwickshire, Scotland, was a military commander during the First Scottish War of Independence.

Origins[edit]

He was the second son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland (d. 1283), by his wife Jean Macrory, heiress of the Isles of Bute and Arran, daughter of James (d. 1210) (who with his father and brothers were killed by the men of Skye), son of Angus, Lord of Bute and Arran (younger son of Somerled, King of the South Isles). He was an uncle of James Douglas, Lord of Douglas, "The Black Douglas".

Career[edit]

He was a military commander during the First Scottish War of Independence. He was killed during the Battle of Falkirk (1298), where he commanded the Scottish archers. He was buried in the churchyard of the Falkirk Old Parish Church.[2][3]

Marriage and issue[edit]

John married Margaret de Bonkyll, the daughter and heiress of Sir Alexander de Bonkyll of that Ilk. Following his marriage he added to his paternal arms of Stewart (Or, a fess chequy argent and azure) a differenced of a bend sable charged with three buckles or, a buckle being the canting heraldic device of the de Bonkyll family. Margaret appears to have remarried, as in 1304 she is named as wife to Sir David, Lord of Brechin.[4] By his wife he had issue:

Royal descendants[edit]

He is the direct paternal ancestor of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, the second husband of his brother's descendant, Mary, Queen of Scots, and of their son, James VI of Scotland, who later became James I of England in 1603.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murison, Alexander Falconer (1900). Sir William Wallace. New York: C. Scribner. p. 105. Retrieved 11 July 2018.
  2. ^ Hardy, Rev J.,The session book of Bunkle and Preston, 1665-1690 p.xxiii
  3. ^ Reid, Stuart (2004). Battles of the Scottish Lowlands. Barnsley: Pen & Sword Books Limited. p. 23. ISBN 9781844150786.
  4. ^ Cal. Doc. Scot. vol ii, pp410-411

Sources[edit]