John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret

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The Lord Carteret
PC
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
In office
1804–1812
Monarch George III
Prime Minister Hon. William Pitt the Younger
The Lord Grenville
The Duke of Portland
Hon. Spencer Perceval
Preceded by Hon. Charles Francis Greville
Succeeded by The Earl of Yarmouth
Personal details
Born 28 December 1772 (1772-12-28)
Died 10 March 1849 (1849-03-11) (aged 76)
Hawnes Place, Bedfordshire
Nationality British
Spouse(s) Mary Anne Master
(d. 1863)
Alma mater St John's College, Cambridge

John Thynne, 3rd Baron Carteret PC (28 December 1772 – 10 March 1849), known as Lord John Thynne between 1789 and 1838, was a British peer and politician.

Background and education[edit]

Carteret was the third son of Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, and Lady Elizabeth, daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge.[1]

Political career[edit]

Carteret was returned to Parliament for Weobly in May 1796, a seat he held until December the same year,[2] and then represented Bath between 1796 and 1832.[3] He served as Vice-Chamberlain of the Household from 1804 to 1812 and was sworn into the Privy Council in 1804.[4] In 1838 he succeeded his childless elder brother in the barony and took his seat in the House of Lords.

Marriage[edit]

In 1801 Lord Carteret married Mary Anne Master (d. February 1863), daughter of Thomas Master. They had no children.

Death & succession[edit]

He died at Hawnes Place in March 1849, aged 76. On his death the barony became extinct, while the estate passed to his nephew the Rev. Lord John Thynne, third son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thynne, Lord John (THN792J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ leighrayment.com
  3. ^ leighrayment.com
  4. ^ leighrayment.com
  5. ^ 'Parishes: Hawnes or Haynes', A History of the County of Bedford: Volume 2 (1908), pp. 338-344. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=62661, accessed 17 July 2010.
  6. ^ Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p.243
  7. ^ a b c Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258. 
  8. ^ a b  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1898). "Thynne, William". Dictionary of National Biography. 56. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  9. ^ Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  10. ^ Booth, Muriel. "THYNNE, John (?1550-1604), of Longleat, Wilts.". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  11. ^ Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "THYNNE, Charles (c.1568-1652), of Cheddar, Som.". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  12. ^ Rugh, R. B.; Critall, Elizabeth. "'Parliamentary history : 1529-1629', in A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5". British History Online. Victoria County History. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  13. ^ Ferris, John P. "THYNNE, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts.". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  14. ^ Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "THYNNE, Sir Thomas (c.1610-c.69), of Richmond, Surr.". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  15. ^ Marshall, Alan. "Thynne, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016. (subscription required (help)). 
  16. ^ Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  17. ^ Hayton, D. W. "THYNNE, Hon. Henry (1675-1708).". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  18. ^ Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville - His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN 9781300878070. 
  19. ^ "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  20. ^ Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  21. ^ "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765-1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  22. ^ Escott, Margaret. "THYNNE, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx.". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 
  23. ^ "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016. 

External links[edit]

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Scott
Lord George Thynne
Member of Parliament for Weobly
1796
With: Lord George Thynne
Succeeded by
Lord George Thynne
Inigo Freeman Thomas
Preceded by
Viscount Weymouth
Sir Richard Arden
Member of Parliament for Bath
1796–1801
With: Sir Richard Arden
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Bath
1801–1832
With: Sir Richard Arden 1801
John Palmer 1801–1808
Charles Palmer 1808–1826, 1830–1832
The Earl of Brecknock 1826–1830
Succeeded by
Charles Palmer
John Arthur Roebuck
Political offices
Preceded by
Hon. Charles Francis Greville
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household
1804–1812
Succeeded by
The Earl of Yarmouth
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Thynn
Baron Carteret
1838–1849
Succeeded by
Extinct