John Tracy (politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other politicians of this name, see John Tracy (disambiguation).
John Tracy
12th Lieutenant Governor of New York
In office
1833–1838
Governor William L. Marcy
Preceded by Edward Philip Livingston
Succeeded by Luther Bradish
Personal details
Born (1783-10-26)October 26, 1783
Goshen, Connecticut
Died June 18, 1864(1864-06-18) (aged 80)
Oxford, New York
Political party Democratic-Republican
Democratic
Spouse(s) Susan Hyde
Profession Attorney

John Tracy (October 26, 1783 Norwich, Connecticut – June 18, 1864 Oxford, New York) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1833 to 1838.

Life[edit]

At the beginning of the 19th century he moved to Columbus, New York. In 1805 he moved to Oxford, where he served as Deputy County Clerk under his relative Uri Tracy. He studied law with Stephen O. Runyan, was admitted to the bar in 1808, and practiced in Oxford. He married Susan Hyde in Franklin, Connecticut on August 30, 1813.

Tracy was active in politics, first as a Democratic-Republican, and later as a Democrat. In 1815, he was appointed Surrogate of Chenango County, a post he held four years. He was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1820, and returned in 1821, 1822 and 1826.

In 1821 he was re-appointed surrogate, and in 1823 he became First Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and he served until resigning in 1833. In 1830 the state legislature elected Tracy as a Regent of the University of the State of New York, and he served until 1833.

From 1833 to 1838, he was Lieutenant Governor under Governor William L. Marcy. In 1846 he was a delegate to the New York State Constitutional Convention, and was chosen its President. After this convention, Tracy withdrew from politics and government.

For many years Tracy was President of the Oxford Academy Board of Trustees.

He died in Oxford, New York on June 18, 1864, and was buried at the Riverview Cemetery in Oxford.[1]

Tracy was survived by his daughters, Esther Marie Mygatt, widow of Henry R. Mygatt, and Susan Eliza Clarke, widow of James W. Clarke; and grandchildren, John Tracy Mygatt, Mai Mygatt, and William R. Mygatt, a lawyer in practice at Oxford, N.Y.

His great-great granddaughter Tracy Dickinson Mygatt was a Socialist playwright and pacifist.[2]

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Edward Philip Livingston
Lieutenant Governor of New York
1833–1838
Succeeded by
Luther Bradish