John Westwood (politician)

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John Westwood
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 72nd[1] district
Assumed office
January 1, 2013
Preceded by Evan Vickers
Personal details
Born Richfield, Utah
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Cedar City, Utah
Alma mater University of Washington
Southern Utah State College
Website [1]

John R. Westwood (born in Richfield, Utah) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Utah House of Representatives representing District 72[2] since January 1, 2013. He lives in Cedar City, UT, with his wife Mary Ellen, and their five children.[3]

Education[edit]

Westwood attended the University of Washington and earned his BS in business and finance from Southern Utah State College (now Southern Utah University).[4]

Political career[edit]

Westwood was elected November 6, 2012.[5] During 2016, he served on the Business, Economic Development and Labor Appropriations Subcommittee, Retirement and Independent Entities Appropriations Subcommittee, the House Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee, House Transportation Committee, and the House Retirement and Independent Entities Committee.[6]

2016 Sponsored Legislation[edit]

Bill Number Bill Title Status
HB0053 Business Resource Centers Amendments Governor Signed - 3/25/2016
HB0036S02 Payroll Deductions for Union Dues House/ filed - 3/10/2016

Representative Westwood floor sponsored SB 63 Survey Monument Replacement. [7]

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 When incumbent Republican Representative Evan Vickers ran for Utah State Senate, Westwood was chosen from among five candidates for the June 26, 2012 Republican Primary which he won with 2,679 votes (67%);[8] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 10,451 votes (85.4%) against Libertarian candidate Barry Short,[9] who had run for the seat in 2010.
  • 2014 Westwood defeated Blake Cozzens in the Republican convention and won the November 4, 2014 General election with 5,210 votes (83.4%) against Libertarian nominee Barry Short and write-in Linda Lou Allen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "John R. Westwood (R)". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah State Legislature. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  2. ^ "John Westwood's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  3. ^ "John Westwood". Philipsburg, MT: Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ "John Westwood". Philipsburg, MT: Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  5. ^ "John Westwood". Philipsburg, MT: Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  6. ^ "John R. Westwood". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah State Legislature. Retrieved April 12, 2016. 
  7. ^ "2016 Legislation". Utah State Leglislature. Retrieved April 12, 2016. 
  8. ^ "2012 Primary Canvass Reports". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  9. ^ "2012 General Canvass Report". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]