Johnny Gruelle

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Johnny Gruelle
Born John Barton Gruelle
(1880-12-24)December 24, 1880
Arcola, Illinois, United States
Died January 9, 1938(1938-01-09) (aged 57)
Miami Springs, Florida, United States
Occupation Artist.Writer
Nationality American
Genre Children's literature
Notable works Raggedy Ann

Johnny Gruelle (December 24, 1880 – January 9, 1938) was an American artist, political cartoonist, children's book author and illustrator (and even songwriter). He is known as the creator of Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy.

History[edit]

Raggedy Ann and Andy

John Barton Gruelle was born in Arcola, Illinois, on December 24, 1880,[1] and at age 2 moved with his family to Indianapolis, Indiana,[2] where his painter father, Richard Gruelle, became associated with the Hoosier Group of painters. Richard Gruelle’s friends included poet James Whitcomb Riley, whose poems “The Elf-Child”, later titled “Little Orphant Annie” (1885) and "The Raggedy Man" (1888), would form the basis for Johnny Gruelle's naming of Raggedy Ann.[2]

John Gruelle's cartoons first appeared in print in the Indianapolis Star in 1905.[3] From 1906 to 1911 his cartooning work appeared in many newspapers, usually signed as Grue, including The Toledo News-Bee,[4] The Pittsburgh Press,[5] The Tacoma Times,[6] and The Spokane Press.[7]

After he beat out 1,500 entrants to win a cartooning contest sponsored in 1911 by The New York Herald, Gruelle created Mr. Twee Deedle, which was in print from that year to at least 1914.[8]

Gruelle gave his daughter Marcella a dusty, faceless rag doll found in the attic. He drew a whimsical face on the doll and named her Raggedy Ann, and in 1915 patented and trademarked the design and name[9] The U.S. Patent D47,789 was dated September 7, 1915. Gruelle began approaching publishers, and 1918, the P.F. Volland Company published Raggedy Ann Stories, promoting it with a Raggedy Ann doll.[9] Both became major successes.[10] In 1920, Gruelle introduced Raggedy Ann's brother, the mischievous and adventuresome Raggedy Andy, in the book Raggedy Andy Stories.[11] Gruelle was awarded a patent for a stuffed animal in 1921 U.S. Patent D59,553.

Gruelle's "Raggedy Ann's Sunny Songs" was set to music by William H. Woodin. One of Gruelle's characters is Little Wooden Willie, a reference to Will Woodin.[12]

Gruelle lived in the Silvermine section of New Canaan, Connecticut, where the dolls were first mass-produced, and later moved his home and company to neighboring Wilton, Connecticut.[citation needed] Gruelle spent a year in Ashland, Oregon, from 1923 to 1924.[13] He died at home in Miami Springs, Florida, on January 9, 1938, of a heart attack.[14]

Bibliography[edit]

Rapunzel, from an edition of Grimm's Fairy Tales, illustrated by Johnny Gruelle

As author and illustrator[edit]

  • All About Cinderella (1916), republished as Cinderella (2012)
  • My Very Own Fairy Stories[15] (1917), republished as Raggedy Ann's Fairy Stories
  • Raggedy Ann Stories[16] (1918)
  • Friendly Fairies[17] (1919)
  • Little Sunny Stories (1919)
  • Raggedy Andy Stories[18] (1920)
  • Orphant Annie[19] (1921)
  • Eddie Elephant (1921)
  • Johnny Mouse and the Wishing Stick (1922), republished as Adventures of Johnny Mouse (2012)
  • The Magical Land of Noom (1922)
  • Raggedy Ann and Andy and the Camel with the Wrinkled Knees (1924)
  • Wishing Pebble (1925)
  • Beloved Belindy (1926)
  • Marcella - A Raggedy Ann Story - Marcella Stories (1929)
  • Raggedy Ann's Magical Wishes (Book is undated)
  • My Fairy Stories (2012), a collection of stories from My Very Own Fairy Stories
  • Friendly Gnomes (2012), a collection of stories from Friendly Fairies

As illustrator[edit]

The titular character Sally Migrundy from the anthology Friendly Fairies (1919)
  • Grimm's Fairy Tales[20] (1914)
  • Nobody's Boy [21] (1916)
  • All About Hansel and Grethel (1917), republished as Hansel and Gretel (2012)
  • All About the Little Small Red Hen [22] (1917)
  • Sunny Bunny by Nina Wilcox Putnam (1918)
  • The Bam Bam Clock by J.P. McEvoy (1920)
  • Quacky Doodles' and Danny Daddles' Book (1916)[23]
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References[edit]

  1. ^ Hall, Patricia (1993). Johnny Gruelle, Creator of Raggedy Ann and Andy. Pelican Publishing. pp. 25–26. ISBN 978-0882899084. 
  2. ^ a b Ksander, Yaël (April 11, 2011). "Raggedy Ann’s Hoosier Pedigree". Indiana Public Media / The Trustees of Indiana University. Archived from the original on April 24, 2011. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ Hall, p. 40
  4. ^ "All Aboard the Water Wagon". The Toledo News-Bee. January 1, 1907. p. 1. 
  5. ^ "The World, the Flesh, and the Baby". Pittsburg Press. November 29, 1909. p. 10. 
  6. ^ "The Day of All Fools". The Tacoma Times. April 1, 1909. p. 1. 
  7. ^ "A Few More Weeks And Then". The Spokane Press. March 6, 1910. p. 16. 
  8. ^ Mr. Twee Deedle at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on September 30, 2015.
  9. ^ a b Hall, Patricia (1999). "Johnny Gruelle Inspired Illustrator". Raggedy-Ann.com. Archived from the original on September 10, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015.  line feed character in |title= at position 15 (help)
  10. ^ "New Raggedy Ann Causing a Stir : It's an Open-and-Shut Case for the Creators' Family - Los Angeles Times". Articles.latimes.com. 1987-11-26. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  11. ^ "Raggedy History". Simon & Schuster. Archived from the original on August 17, 2004. 
  12. ^ Wayne Homren (2007-12-16). "William H. Woodin'S Political Journey And Musical Talent". Coinbooks.org. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  13. ^ "Raggedy Ann in Ashland by Dawna Curler". As It Was Master Script List, Southern Oregon Historical Society. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved November 5, 2008. 
  14. ^ "John Gruelle Dead; Cartoonist, Writer; Creator of Comic Strip 'Brutus' Was on The Herald Tribune - Wrote Children's Books". The New York Times. Associated Press. January 10, 1938. Retrieved October 30, 2015.  Abstract; full article requires subscription.
  15. ^ My Very Own Fairy Stories at Internet Archive
  16. ^ "Raggedy Ann Stories by Johnny Gruelle - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2006-04-17. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  17. ^ "Friendly Fairies by Johnny Gruelle - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2004-02-01. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  18. ^ "Raggedy Andy Stories by Johnny Gruelle - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2005-12-22. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  19. ^ Orphant Annie Story Book - Google Boeken. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  20. ^ "Grimm's Fairy Stories by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2004-02-01. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  21. ^ "Nobody's Boy by Hector Malot - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2008-04-19. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  22. ^ "All About the Little Small Red Hen by Anonymous - Free Ebook". Gutenberg.org. 2008-05-30. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  23. ^ Quacky Doodles and Danny Daddles at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on September 30, 2015.

External links[edit]