Johnny Hines

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Johnny Hines
JohnnyHines.jpg
Born(1895-07-25)July 25, 1895
Golden, Colorado, United States
DiedOctober 24, 1970(1970-10-24) (aged 75)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationActor
Years active1914–38
Spouse(s)Irma Warner

Johnny Hines (July 25, 1895 – October 24, 1970), born John F. Hines, was an American actor active primarily during the silent era, who did not transition well into talking pictures. During the course of his career he would appear in over 50 films, and numerous film shorts.

Life and career[edit]

Born in Golden, Colorado on June 25, 1895, he was the brother to film director Charles Hines, and to Samuel E. Hines, who was a bit-part actor during the early years of sound film.[1] In the early 1910s, Hines would attend the City College of New York (CCNY), although it is unclear whether he obtained his degree.[2] Hines would make his film debut in 1914, when he appeared in several shorts and three films. His film debut would be in a featured role in The Man of the Hour, which stars Robert Warwick.[3] During the remaining years of silent pictures, he would appear in almost 50 films, many of them in starring roles.[4][5] His first starring role was in 1915's The Cub, directed by Maurice Tourneur[6] Some of his more notable films include: Little Johnny Jones, the first film version of the George M. Cohan musical of the same name, in which he had the title role,[7] and the film version of Leo Tolstoy's Zhivoy trup (The Living Corpse), entitled The Weakness of Man.[8]

During the silent era, Hines would also co-direct two of the films he starred in: Burn 'Em Up Barnes in 1921 and 1923's Little Johnny Jones.[4] Hines would write the script for 1924's Conductor 1492, in which he would star, and his brother, Charles, would direct.[9]

With the advent of sound in the motion picture industry, Hines career went into decline. During the 1930s, he would appear in only six films, all in smaller, supporting roles. In 1938 he would have his last significant role, that of Parsons in Too Hot to Handle, which starred Clark Gable, Myrna Loy and Walter Pidgeon.[10] He would appear in only one more film, 1946's Magnificent Doll, starring Ginger Rogers and David Niven, in which he would have a bit part.[11]

Hines died on October 24, 1970 at the age of 75 in Los Angeles, California. He was buried in Calvary Cemetery.[1]

Filmography[edit]

(Per AFI database)[4][5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Not in AFI source, but is listed in BFI

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Johnny Hines". Find a Grave. Archived from the original on November 6, 2012. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  2. ^ "Johnny Hines". AllMovie. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  3. ^ "The Man of the Hour: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c "Johnny Hines". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  5. ^ a b "John Hines". American Film Institute. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  6. ^ "The Cub: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  7. ^ "Little Johnny Jones: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  8. ^ "The Weakness of Man: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  9. ^ "Conductor 1492: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "Too Hot to Handle: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  11. ^ "Magnificent Doll: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2015.

External links[edit]