Johnny Spiegel

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Johnny Spiegel
Sport(s) Football, basketball
Playing career
Football
1913–1914 Washington & Jefferson
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1915–1916 Chattanooga
1921–1922 Muhlenberg
Basketball
1915–1916 Chattanooga
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1915–1916 Chattanooga
Head coaching record
Overall 19–15–4 (football)
2–4 (basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1913
All-American, 1914

John E. "Johnny" Spiegel was an American football player, coach of football and basketball, and college athletics administrator. A native of Detroit, Michigan, Spiegel played at the halfback position for Washington & Jefferson College from 1913 to 1914. He was selected as a second-team All-American in 1913 and was the leading scorer in college football.[1] In 1914, he was a consensus first-team All-American.[2][3][4] From 1915 to 1916, Spiegel was the football coach, basketball coach, and athletic director at the University of Chattanooga.[5][6] After World War I, Spiegel coached at Muhlenberg College from 1921 to 1922.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Chattanooga Moccasins (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1915–1916)
1915 Chattanooga 5–2–2
1916 Chattanooga 3–5 0–4 T–22nd
Chattanooga: 8–7–2
Muhlenberg Mules () (1921–1922)
1921 Muhlenberg 7–2–1
1922 Muhlenberg 4–6–1
Muhlenberg: 11–8–2
Total: 19–15–4

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Spiegel Says Wash-Jeff Will Have Great Year: Red and Black's Half on Ground Early". The Pittsburgh Press. August 16, 1914. 
  2. ^ "Spiegel Gets Place on Star Grid Eleven". The Pittsburg Press. Pittsburgh, PA. November 22, 1914. Sporting Section, p. 4. 
  3. ^ "Menke Selects Annual All-American Eleven". New Castle News. November 25, 1914. 
  4. ^ "NCAA 2008 Record Book". NCAA. Archived from the original on July 14, 2009. 
  5. ^ The University Of Chattanooga Sixty Years. 
  6. ^ "Johnny Spiegel for Director". The Atlanta Constitution. March 2, 1915.