Jonathan L. Austin

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Jonathan Loring Austin
2nd Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth[1]
In office
1806–1808
Preceded by John Avery, Jr.
Succeeded by William Tudor
10th Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts[2][2]
In office
1811–1812
Preceded by Thomas Harris
Succeeded by John T. Apthorp
Member of the
Massachusetts Senate[2]
Personal details
Born January 2, 1748[1][2] 8
Boston, Massachusetts[1][2]
Died May 10, 1826[1][3]
Boston, Massachusetts[1]
Political party Democratic-Republican Party
Spouse(s) Hannah Ivers,[4] (March 20, 1756[4] −1818) m. Boston April 4, 1782.[5]
Children James Treacothie Austin[1]
Alma mater Harvard College; 1766.[2]
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
[1][2]
Service/branch Continental Army
Rank Major[1][2]
Battles/wars American Revolution[1][2]

Jonathan Loring Austin (January 2, 1748 – May 10, 1826) was a Massachusetts revolutionary, diplomat and politician who served as the second Secretary of the Commonwealth and the tenth Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts. Austin was the father of Massachusetts Attorney General James Treacothie Austin.[1]

Early life[edit]

Austin was born on January 2, 1748 in Boston, Massachusetts.[2] Austin graduated from Harvard College in 1766.[1] After he graduated from Harvard, Austin moved to Portsmouth, New Hampshire and became a merchant there.[1]

American Revolutionary War[edit]

When the war started Austin became a Major in Langdon's Regiment, and later an aid to General John Sullivan.[1]

Massachusetts Board of War[edit]

Austin was the secretary to the Massachusetts Board of War until October 1777.[1]

Capture and release[edit]

In January 1780 Austin was captured by the British while on a mission to Europe to secure a loan for Massachusetts.[1] Austin was later released. He failed to secure the loan and he returned in the autumn of 1781.[1]

Marriage[edit]

Austin married Hannah Ivers,[4] the daughter of James[4] & Hannah (Trecothick) Ivers,[4] in Boston, on April 4, 1782.[5]

Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth[edit]

Austin served as Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth for two years, from 1806 to 1808.

Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts[edit]

Austin served as Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts from 1811 to 1812.

References[edit]

  • Julie Helen Ott, “Lydia and Her Daughters: A Boston Matrilineal Case Study,” NEHGS Nexus, Vol. IX, No. 1, pg. 25 (1992). [1]
  • Cutter, William Richard, ed., Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume IV (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1908), 1717.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Wilson, James Grant (1888), "Appletons' Cyclopedia of American Biography, Vol. I., Aaron-Crandall", D. APPLETON AND COMPANY (New York, N.Y.), p. 120. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Wharton, Francis (1889), The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, Volume I, Washington, DC: United States. Dept. of State: GPO, p. 620. 
  3. ^ Wharton, Francis (1889), "The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, Volume I", United States. Dept. of State: GPO (Washington, DC), p. 621. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Cutter, William Richard (1908), "Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume IV", Lewis Historical Publishing Company (New York City), p. 1717. 
  5. ^ a b Otto, Julie Helen (February–March 1992), Julie Helen Ott, "Lydia and Her Daughters: A Boston Matrilineal Case Study," NEHGS Nexus, Vol. IX, No. 1, Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, p. 25.  External link in |title= (help)
Political offices
Preceded by
John Avery, Jr.
2nd Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth
1806–1808
Succeeded by
William Tudor
Preceded by
Thomas Harris
10th Treasurer and Receiver-General of Massachusetts
1811–1812
Succeeded by
John T. Apthorp